cerkalo
» » Significant Others (Tales of the City)

Significant Others (Tales of the City) download ebook

by Armistead Maupin

Significant Others (Tales of the City) download ebook
ISBN:
055299880X
ISBN13:
978-0552998802
Author:
Armistead Maupin
Publisher:
Transworld Pub (August 31, 2000)
Language:
Pages:
320 pages
ePUB:
1472 kb
Fb2:
1586 kb
Other formats:
lrf mobi txt azw
Category:
Contemporary
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

Author: Armistead Maupin. Series: Tales of the City. Title: Significant Others. Significant Others, the fifth self-contained chronicle in the Tales of the City saga, is a cunningly observed class comedy that's sure to be relished by the cognoscenti and by new readers alike.

Author: Armistead Maupin.

949. Published: 1987. More Tales of the City. An extended love letter to a magical San Francisco. Maybe the Moon, Armistead Maupin's first novel since ending his bestselling Tales of the City series, is the audaciously original chronicle of Cadence Roth - Hollywood actress, singer, iconoclast and former Guiness Book record holder as the world's shortest woman. All of 31 inches tall, Cady is a true survivor in a town where - as she says - "you can die of encouragement.

Armistead Maupin's much loved characters are back. Lin Coghlan dramatises Significant Others and Sure of You from the Tales of the City series. It's San Francisco in the 80's Mary Ann Singleton's TV career is going well when old boyfriend Burke turns up. Mouse. Produced by Charlotte Riches Directed in Salford by Susan Roberts.

Significant Others (1987) is the fifth book in the Tales of the City series by American novelist Armistead Maupin. It is now 1985 and much of the action is set in the Russian River area north of San Francisco. It originally was serialized in the San Francisco Examiner. Here, successful businessmen from around the globe gather at Bohemian Grove for a three-week encampment of male bonding, while downriver from them events at Wimminwood, a lesbian music and arts festival, threaten the relationship of DeDe Halcyon-Day and D'orothea Wilson.

Listen online to Significant Others - Inspiration for the Netflix Limited Series, Tales of the CityThe fifth novel in the beloved Tales of the City series, Armistead Maupin’s best-selling San Franci.

Listen online to Significant Others - Inspiration for the Netflix Limited Series, Tales of the CityThe fifth novel in the beloved Tales of the City series, Armistead Maupin’s best-selling San Franc. Inspiration for the Netflix Limited Series, Tales of the City The fifth novel in the beloved Tales of the City series, Armistead Maupin’s best-selling San Francisco saga. Tranquillity reigns in the ancient redwood forest until a women-only music festival sets up camp downriver from an all-male retreat for the ruling class. Among those entangled in the ensuing mayhem are a lovesick nurseryman, a panic-stricken philanderer, and the world’s most beautiful fat woman.

Armistead Maupin and Tales of the City - quiz. Sure of You. Babycakes. The creator of the much-loved novel sequence turns 70 this week. Find out how well you know your way around his San Francisco. Damian Barr makes a pilgrimage to 28 Barbary Lane. Tales of the City made its first appearance as a serial in which newspaper? The San Francisco Chronicle. The Los Angeles Times. Which Tales of the City novel is said to have been the first work of fiction to feature the death of a character from Aids? Significant Others.

For almost four decades Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City has blazed its own trail through popular culture-from a. .Tales of the City - Armistead Maupin.

For almost four decades Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City has blazed its own trail through popular culture-from a groundbreaking newspaper serial to a classic novel, to a television event that entranced millions around the world. The first of nine novels about the denizens of the mythic apartment house at 28 Barbary Lane, Tales is both a sparkling comedy of manners and an indelible portrait of an era that changed forever the way we live. MARY ANN SINGLETON WAS TWENTY-FIVE YEARS old when she saw San Francisco for the first time. She came to the city alone for an eight-day vacation.

Armistead Maupin's uproarious and moving Tales of the City novels-the first three of which are collected in this omnibus volume-have earned a unique niche in American literature and are considered indelible documents of cultural change from the sevent

Armistead Maupin's uproarious and moving Tales of the City novels-the first three of which are collected in this omnibus volume-have earned a unique niche in American literature and are considered indelible documents of cultural change from the sevent. Back to Barbary Lane: The Tales of the City Omnibus (Tales of the City,

Significant Others, the fifth self-contained chronicle in the Tales of the City saga, is a cunningly observed class comedy . Armistead Maupin was born in Washington, . in 1944 but was brought up in Raleigh, North Carolina

Significant Others, the fifth self-contained chronicle in the Tales of the City saga, is a cunningly observed class comedy that's sure to be relished by the cognoscenti and by new readers alike. in 1944 but was brought up in Raleigh, North Carolina. A graduate of the University of North Carolina, he served as a naval officer in Vietnam before moving to California in 1971 as a reporter for the Associated Press. In 1976 he launched his daily newspaper serial, Tales of the City, in the San Francisco Chronicle.

Armistead Jones Maupin, Jr. (/ˈmɔːpɪn/ MAW-pin) (born May 13, 1944) is an American writer who wrote Tales of the City, a series of novels set in San Francisco. Maupin was born in Washington, . to Diana Jane (Barton) and Armistead Jones Maupin

Armistead Jones Maupin, Jr. to Diana Jane (Barton) and Armistead Jones Maupin

Significant Others
Reviews:
  • Haal
You gotta read the whole set of books by Armistead Maupin (Tales of the City series). Truly wonderful characters, set in San Francisco. If you watched the British broadcast of Tales of the City, and loved it, then these books are for you! The last couple of books was written after the mini-series, so there's lots of laughs & heartaches from there. He writes beautifully, has some excellent wit, and deals with major problems in the process. I give it more stars than Amazon has, it's like you live there with those crazy characters. What a deal that is! Pick them ALL up and read them in the series, I promise you won't be sorry!
  • Nern
When I first started reading Significant Others, I didn't think I would like it. First off, two of the residents of Barbary Lane moved to another place, which kind of broke up the family feel of the story. The time is supposed to be either '85 or '86 and there is one main character who seems to be regulated to the background (I'm not talking about Mona).

But as I kept on reading, the story lines sucked me back in. Maupin is a great story teller that keeps the reader hooked, even though the time is different, places are different, and the beloved characters are different. Remember, the story takes place nine or ten years after we've been introduced to the Barbary Lane family, and they're not the same people they were in '76.

I'm not going to give away any secrets from SO. Just know that although the story and characters have evolved, Barbary Lane retains that human interaction/warmth(?) element, which seems to be the thread linking all of the Tales of the City books together.

But on the other hand, SO does feel like a "darker" book. Perhaps it's because the characters have grown up. Maybe it's because they've become cynical. Maybe it was the disease that was devouring the city. Or maybe, I feel that SO is darker because I know it's the second to the last of the TOTC series...and the realization that nothing lasts forever, finally hit me.
  • Keth
As always, Armistead Maupin's writing is superb and his characters intriguing. The story line moves away from 28 Barbary and into the countryside, so we sort of lose touch with some of our favorite people. Even so, Maupin introduces us to some hilarious characters and situations - a women's camp and a high-falutin' men's retreat, both of which are populated with wild and crazy people. I simply loved the first three books in this series, which brought back all those good memories of San Francisco, but I'm also enjoying the "spreading out" of the setting and feel I'm getting to know more about the people who live in the city and what they do and what makes them who and what they are.
  • Pameala
I have read the Tales of the City series multiple times. I continue to enjoy Armistead Maupin's stories following the lives of the characters that started in the first in the series Tales of the City
  • Haralem
I would recommend this book to Maupin readers who enjoy the entire Tales set, which will conclude this very month. My husband and I have come to enjoy the characters very much; some people would be uncomfortable with the frank and honest--and relaxed, but never graphic--portrayal of gay life as normal life. That would not be Maupin's problem. It's a fine series, and it inspired to some degree Alexander McCall Smith's Scotland Street series, which has a similar affectionate tone and appreciation of people.
  • Trash Obsession
I have read these books completely out of order but it has not made one iota of difference in the quality or excellence of the material. I have come to know and love all of the amazing characters. I have become invested in their lives, their loves and their emotional highs and lows.

I am going to be extraordinarily sad when I finish the last volume. Although I am a gay woman, your life experiences cross paths with our daily life. Familiarity is nice sometimes. Thank you.
  • Mustard Forgotten
It continues the saga and is a delight to read. After the initial 3 Tales of the City, you kind of want to know what was next for the main characters and Maupin provides wonderfully. Each character is well defined and you come to feel you know these people. I'm glad he continued the saga even if these last 4 books will never be televised.
A year ago when I was thinking about relocating to the SF area, I picked up the first book in this series, got hooked, and bought the entire series. It made me fall even more in love with the city I knew I had to be a part of. I year later, I do work in SF and live very close by (rental market in SF is a whole other story - if only Mrs. Madrigal had a place available!!). Light, fun reads - I really enjoyed the entire series.