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Gun, with Occasional Music download ebook

by Jonathan Lethem

Gun, with Occasional Music download ebook
ISBN:
141770733X
ISBN13:
978-1417707331
Author:
Jonathan Lethem
Publisher:
Topeka Bindery (January 1995)
Language:
ePUB:
1136 kb
Fb2:
1281 kb
Other formats:
rtf docx doc mobi
Category:
Contemporary
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Gun, with Occasional Music is a 1994 novel by American writer Jonathan Lethem. It blends science fiction and hardboiled detective fiction. It was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1994.

Gun, with Occasional Music is a 1994 novel by American writer Jonathan Lethem. The novel follows the adventures of Conrad Metcalf, a tough, smart-alecky private detective, through a futuristic version of San Francisco and Oakland, California. Metcalf is hired by a man who claims that he's being framed for the murder of a prominent urologist.

Jonathan Lethem never ceases to amaze me. "Gun, with Occasional Music" almost reads like a graphic novel . Now I'm going to read it again, like I do all of Lethem's books. You have to. Not because you missed anything significant. Like Dik's "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep", Lethem's romp is a kind of sci-fi meets detective noir. I read it in two sittings.

In Gun, With Occasional Music, Jonathan Lethem gives us science fiction's worthy successor to Raymond Chandler. Even a cursory familiarity with Chandler's pulp noir will ring through with startling clarity to readers of this novel

Gun, with Occasional Music. Author: Jonathan Lethem. Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Orlando, 2003.

Gun, with Occasional Music. Gumshoe Conrad Metcalf has problems-there’s a rabbit in his waiting room and a trigger-happy kangaroo on his tail. Near-future Oakland is a brave new world where evolved animals are members of society, the police monitor citizens by their karma levels, and mind-numbing drugs such as Forgettol and Acceptol are all the rage. Metcalf has been shadowing Celeste, the wife of an affluent doctor

Jonathan Lethem's Gun with Occasional Music (actually the author's first published novel, though newly released here on audio) is no exception — in fact, it takes these noir traditions to their illogical extreme by locating the plot in a surreal near-future where current societal trends ar. .

Jonathan Lethem's Gun with Occasional Music (actually the author's first published novel, though newly released here on audio) is no exception — in fact, it takes these noir traditions to their illogical extreme by locating the plot in a surreal near-future where current societal trends are reflected in a funhouse mirror.

JONATHAN LETHEM is the author of several novels, including Motherless Brooklyn; The Fortress of Solitude;Gun, with Occasional Music; and Dissident Gardens. Библиографические данные. Gun, with Occasional Music A Harvest book.

Reviews:
  • Aradwyn
Jonathan Lethem never ceases to amaze me. "Gun, with Occasional Music" almost reads like a graphic novel... in fact, it is screaming to be made into one. Kangaroo hitmen, talking sheep, genetic manipulations, babyheads... Like Dik's "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep", Lethem's romp is a kind of sci-fi meets detective noir. I read it in two sittings. Now I'm going to read it again, like I do all of Lethem's books. You have to. Not because you missed anything significant. It's those little touches that might have gone by too smoothly that need to be savored again, that I seek to recapture.
  • Bloodhammer
I really wanted to like this book because the cover and name are really great, I know, lame reason. There were some parts that the author could've skipped as they didn't add to the story, but then some really interesting developments, like the human-animals and drugs everyone does, that he doesn't really expand on, even though it would've helped with the story and interest factor. Also the characters are pretty basic except for the protagonist and at some points it can get a bit confusing of what exactly is happening and why. Overall it wasn't bad but nothing great.
  • AfinaS
This audiobook is well read by Nick Sullivan. His voice is resonant and pleasant to listen to; however, I think the pace is a bit too slow. I found myself waiting and urging that the narrator say the next word - though everything is very well pronounced. He gives an appropriate enough characterization of detective Metcalf as well as the other characters. I especially like the kangaroo. However, it is not done with enough urgency. Worst are the scenes of suspense of the novel. The reading of the action moments is only mildly exciting. However, for listening in the car and other places, this audiobook is a great supplement to the novel.

Lethem's novel itself is fascinating. His prose already in this first novel is beyond accomplished - perfect flow and beautiful language. Especially for people who know the Bay Area, many interesting areas are described - from Oakland to El Cerrito, rather than the standard San Francisco. However, this first novel feels a bit too close to Philip K Dick's world (Lethem's idol). Feels like a belated PKD novel rather than something truly new for the 1990s. Also, there is a bit too much noir and not enough science fiction (at least for sci-fi fans); some fascinating ideas like the advancement of animals, freezing of bodies in prison, new uses of drugs, but I wished to know more about the new world. Then again, this first novel is worlds better than PKD's first novel.

The best way to read the book: a reversal of PKD's "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep." Instead of mechanical animals, we have evolved animals. Instead of chickenheads, we have babyheads. The drug use and regulation is here taken to new dimensions of regulation and insanity. And instead of a bounty hunter, Deckard, we have... well, Metcalf, whose nickname is "Dickface," perhaps an ironic reference to PKD.
  • Winawel
I'm currently reading Nick Hornby's The Polysyllabic Spree, and he mentioned reading Lethem's The Fortress of Solitude, which reminded how much several people I know loved Lethem's Motherless Brooklyn, which in turn reminded me of a little science fiction (ish) novel that Lethem wrote back in 1994 which I had wanted to read. That's the genealogy. I picked up the book last week, and I basically read it in the last 24 hours (while traveling from DC to Atlanta to Rio to Brasilia). It had me completely captivated.

A hard-boiled detective addicted to dope and flowery metaphors goes up against the institutional cops to solve a murder. And there's a kangaroo with a gun. And a house that's a hologram. And people getting frozen (think Han Solo at the end of The Empire Strikes Back). But before you stop, the beauty of Lethem's novel is that it doesn't feel like science fiction. It feels like a captivating crime noir novel. The reason is that Lethem reels you in at the first pages with the story and the character, and only bit by bit, over time, do you realize that the world is different from our own (right now). (One problem with much science fiction and fantasy is that it requires such a massive investment to start the book: the planet of what? the what-reorganizing matter machine? huh?) And the science fiction elements all feel relevant: the walking, talking animals are the result of artificial evolution processes, and everyone is taking to dope to forget their lives (think a gritty Brave New World). The crime story itself has the requisite zillion twists and turns, and Lethem leads us right up to an impressively surprising finale.

Note: Lots of strong language, a fair amount of violent, and some sexual content.