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I Don't Know How She Does it download ebook

by Allison Pearson

I Don't Know How She Does it download ebook
ISBN:
1856867803
ISBN13:
978-1856867801
Author:
Allison Pearson
Publisher:
Random House Audiobooks (December 5, 2002)
Language:
ePUB:
1217 kb
Fb2:
1938 kb
Other formats:
rtf lrf lit azw
Category:
Contemporary
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

How do I know that? Because I still recall the look my own mother exchanged with Mrs. Frieda Davies in 1974, when a small boy in a dusty green parka approached the altar at Harvest Festival with two tins of Libby’s cling peaches in a shoe box. The look was unforgettable.

How do I know that? Because I still recall the look my own mother exchanged with Mrs.

Книга жанра: Проза, Современная проза. Читать онлайн в библиотеке Booksonline. juggle: v. & n. v. 1 intr. perform feats of dexterity, esp. by tossing objects in the air and catching them, keeping several in the air at the same time. 2 tr. continue to deal with (several activities) at once, esp. with ingenuity. by with) a deceive or cheat. b misrepresent (facts). c rearrange adroitly. n. 1 a piece of juggling. How did I get here? Can someone please tell me that? Not in this kitchen, I mean in this life

Look for more books by Allison Pearson. Kate Reddy is having a hard time.

Look for more books by Allison Pearson. One person found this helpful.

Allison Pearson I Don't Know How She Does It juggle: v. by tossing objects in the air and catching them, keeping several in the air at the same time

Allison Pearson I Don't Know How She Does It juggle: v.

Delightfully smart and heartbreakingly poignant, Allison Pearson's smash debut novel has exploded onto . With panache, wisdom, and uproarious wit, I Don't Know How She Does It brilliantly dramatizes the dilemma of every working mo. .

Delightfully smart and heartbreakingly poignant, Allison Pearson's smash debut novel has exploded onto bestseller lists as "The national anthem for working mothers. Hedge-fund manager, wife, and mother of two, Kate Reddy manages to juggle nine currencies in five time zones and keep in step with the Teletubbies.

Pearson brings her sharp wit and compassionate intelligence to this hilarious and, at times, piercingly sad study of the human cost of trying to Have It All.

I Don’t Know How She Does It. Annotation. Author: Allison Pearson. Pearson brings her sharp wit and compassionate intelligence to this hilarious and, at times, piercingly sad study of the human cost of trying to Have It All. Women everywhere are already talking about the Kate Reddy column which appears weekly in the Daily Telegraph, and recommending it to their sisters, mothers, friends and even their bewildered partners. This fictional debut by one of Britain’s most gifted journalists is the subject of a movie deal with Miramax rumoured to be for almost $ 1 million and has sold around the world

Pearson is the author of a novel, "I Don't Know How She Does It" (2002), a "chick lit" examination of the pressures of modern motherhood. The book was a bestseller in England and America.

Pearson is the author of a novel, "I Don't Know How She Does It" (2002), a "chick lit" examination of the pressures of modern motherhood.

Allison Pearson was born in South Wales. An award-winning journalist, she was named Newcomer of the Year at the British Book Awards for I Don't Know How She Does It. Allison has written for many magazines and newspapers including the Independent on Sunday, Observer, the Sunday Times and the London Evening Standard. Allison is now a staff writer at the Daily Telegraph. She lives with her family in Cambridge. Библиографические данные.

In an uproariously funny and achingly sad novel, Allison Pearson brilliantly dramatises the dilemma of working .

In an uproariously funny and achingly sad novel, Allison Pearson brilliantly dramatises the dilemma of working motherhood at the start of the twenty-first century. Publisher: Vintage Publishing ISBN: 9780099428381 Number of pages: 368 Weight: 251 g Dimensions: 198 x 129 x 23 mm.

With panache, wisdom, and uproarious wit," I Don't Know How She Does It" brilliantly dramatizes the dilemma of every .

With panache, wisdom, and uproarious wit," I Don't Know How She Does It" brilliantly dramatizes the dilemma of every working mom. See all Product description. Taking a hard look as well as a sacrilegious poke at all the questions that women ask themselves, Pearson brings honesty, warmth, and compassion to the everyday situations we all find ourselves in.

Meet Kate Reddy, fund manager and mother of two. She can juggle nine different currencies in five different time zones and get herself and two children washed and dressed and out of the house in half an hour. A victim of time famine, Kate counts seconds like other women count calories. As she hurtles between appointments, through her head spools the crazy tape-loop of the working mother's life: must remember client reports, bouncy castles, transatlantic phone call, nativity play, check Dow Jones, cancel hygienist, squeeze sagging pelvic floor, make time for sex. Factor in a manipulative nanny, an Australian boss who looks at Kate's breasts as if they're on special offer, a long suffering husband, her quietly aghast in-laws, two needy children and an e-mail lover, and you have a woman juggling so many balls that some day soon something's going to hit the ground. In an uproariously funny and achingly sad novel, Allison Pearson captures the guilty secret lives of working mothers, the self-recriminations, comic deceptions, forgeries, giddy exhaustion and despair as no other writer has ever done. With fierce irony and a sparkling style, she brilliantly dramatises the dilemma of working motherhood at the start of the 21st century.
Reviews:
  • Rainbearer
Kate Reddy has it all--the fantastic husband, the two adorable kids, the high-powered job in finance, the eczema, the spoiled nanny, the half-finished renovations, the stress of knowing the stay-at-home moms will always outbake her at school functions, and the fantastic wardrobe of Armani and power shoes. And let's not forget Winston, the taxi-driver-slash-philosophy-student who helps Kate remember the candies of her childhood. Or the candy tin, anyway, now filled with something a little less sweet and more weed-y. 

Kate is a working mom, trying to stay ahead in a chauvinistic business and trying to keep her family together despite being sent around the world to meet with clients at little more than a moment's notice. She only keeps her sanity through emails with friends and an increasingly problematic shoe addiction. 

Through a year of her life, stresses grow. Kate still doesn't have a school picked out for her 6-year-old daughter. Her in-laws disapprove of her job. Her husband is growing disillusioned with her being the primary bread winner. Her father is being hounded by creditors, her nanny only stays loyal through an increasing series of bribes, and an email accidentally sent to a client instead of a bestie definitely means certain termination. And then, when her 2-year-old's favorite cuddly toy goes missing, it's a near atomic meltdown for Kate, who is trying to be all things to all people and feeling like there's nothing left to give. 

Allison Pearson's I Don't Know How She Does It blends humor and realism into an amazing novel of the modern woman. Taking a hard look as well as a sacrilegious poke at all the questions that women ask themselves, Pearson brings honesty, warmth, and compassion to the everyday situations we all find ourselves in. Have kids or no? Work or stay home to care for the family? The conveniences of the city or the peace of the suburbs? The exclusive school or the public school? Where to vacation? Where do we find the time to do all the things we need to do without losing ourselves in the process? 

I'd heard about this book for awhile before taking the plunge. I figured, as I often do, that if something is this popular, it's probably not for me. And as often happens in this situation, I was wrong. This book is amazing and perfect in almost every way, and you are doing yourself a disservice every day that you let go by without picking it up and reading it. With hints of Bridget Jones, Murphy Brown, and Elyse Keaton, Pearson's Kate Reddy is that working mother who can make a killing in the boardroom (when she mistakenly wears her red bra under a white shirt) and make a batch of homemade looking pastries for her daughter's school function with only several boxes of perfect store-bought pastries, a rolling pin, and a little pent-up aggression. Kate Reddy is whip-smart, hysterical, and so very real. 

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  • Duzshura
So. Much. Anxiety. If I had kids, I would totally be Kate. Lost in between two worlds and failing miserable at balancing them both. I just cannot seem to grasp the high demand job + motherhood balance, and it gives me heart palpitations just thinking about it. EVERYTHING in this book just confirmed that motherhood is not for me! Don't get me wrong - I admire the people who can do it! I just have ZERO faith in myself that I'd ever be able to balance the two without buckets of Xanax and a therapist on speed dial.

Kate Reddy is having a hard time. She's got a high power job and some littles at home and she is struggling making it all work. She refuses to become a Pinterest mom, and doesn't really have the time anyway, plus, her job doesn't take her as serious as they should - because she's a ROCKSTAR, but she's a women, so... well, 'nuff said. Trying to find the time to be a good mom to her kids, wife to Richard, and give her job the attention it deserves - is not working out, and Kate needs to figure out her priorities - and fast!

I love Allison Pearson's writing - its quick, descriptive, and so witty. I get a bit lost in some of the British slang, but it's still fun pretending I understand it. Kate trying to figure out how to be a mother in a man's world, is equally sad and hilarious and I had fun reading this. Next up is How Hard Can it Be! I'm excited to read the follow up to this book and see where Kate has landed at 50!
  • Qag
I made it about halfway through this book. I got too bored and annoyed to finish it. Bored because I've already lived the career-loving Mom life, so this was all old news to me; annoyed because the character was too whiny and preachy for my taste. The main character has poor organizational skills, and this causes her life as a working mom to be quite a bit more chaotic than it would be otherwise. She reminds me of one of my colleagues that is constantly in crisis. I expected to identify with the main character, but I really didn't. As the cliche goes, she's one of those people that make working moms look bad.
  • Sirara
I watched the movie with SJP and Pierce Brosnan and thought it was cute. I was curious to read the book it was based on and I am glad I did because as usual, the movie left out not only important portions of the story, it really scaled back on the sometimes brutal but refreshing honesty of the author as she assesses her relationship to her husband, her father and her children. Probably the people involved in making the movie thought the audience would not relate to the main character if she was not totally likeable but in fact, I related to the character written in the book much more because it was so much more honest. As a mom/wife/career woman with similarly dysfinctional thorny love-hate relationships with my own parents, the book really resonated with me. And it helped that a lot of it was laugh out loud funny. I am already in the middle of my second reading. This is like Bridget Jones all grown up married with kids, but much more raw and honest.
  • Flash_back
This is a hard review to write, because on many levels Allison Pearson really does hit the mark in terms of detailing what it is like to be a modern mother - the guilt, the messes, lack of time and sleep, the sense of being obliged to do too much and keep everyone happy. It is very close to the bone.

Although I did enjoy this aspect of the book and could strongly relate to it, I found myself increasingly aggitated by the main character Kate Reddy. There was no compromise or give and take with her, especially in regards to her husband. In fact most of the men described in the book were one-dimensional, and compared to my experience very old fashioned. Kate charges around like a bull at a gate, seemingly oblivious to what is really going on around her or bothering to have any real communication about what is going on or what can be done about it- she just takes charge. For me that is where she separates from my experience as a working mum.