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Om the Secret of Ahbor Valley download ebook

by Talbot Mundy

Om the Secret of Ahbor Valley download ebook
ISBN:
0091300436
ISBN13:
978-0091300432
Author:
Talbot Mundy
Publisher:
Point Loma Publishing; First Edition Thus edition (1980)
ePUB:
1631 kb
Fb2:
1926 kb
Other formats:
docx lrf mobi lit
Category:
Contemporary
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

Excerpt:"Ommony managed to master his emotions somehow, but it was not easy, for here was proof of a system of spying that out-spied the Secret Service. How had the Lama learned that the stone had been entrusted to McGregor, to be given in turn to Macauley, to be taken to Tilgaun? Given that much information in the first place it might have been comparatively easy to trace the stone afterward, but-McGregor had surely not talked.

But, mostly, Om is a wonderful book filled with exotic and unusual characters. The middle section of the book drags a bit, feels a bit overly long, but this may be because the reading sensibilities of the pre-internet and pre-television age are dramatically different from those of today. Highly Recommended for those readers who enjoy Adventure fiction and those interested in Late Imperial Adventure fiction. The book was well formatted and easy to navigate through.

Talbot Mundy (born William Lancaster Gribbon, 23 April 1879 – 5 August 1940) was an English-born American writer of. .Many of his novels produced in the coming years, most notably Om: The Secret of Ahbor Valley and The Devil's Guard, reflected his Theosophical beliefs.

Talbot Mundy (born William Lancaster Gribbon, 23 April 1879 – 5 August 1940) was an English-born American writer of adventure fiction. Based for most of his life in the United States, he also wrote under the pseudonym of Walter Galt. Best known as the author of King of the Khyber Rifles and the Jimgrim series, much of his work was published in pulp magazines. He also involved himself in various failed business ventures, including an oil drilling operation in Tijuana, Mexico.

Talbot Mundy wrote many other books on India that are also grippingly good! . Not only is that the plot of Om: The Secret of the Ahbor Valley, it is Mundy's personal philosophy brought to the form of a novel.

Not only is that the plot of Om: The Secret of the Ahbor Valley, it is Mundy's personal philosophy brought to the form of a novel. Much influenced by Theosophy (easily apparent from what little I know of it), it is top-heavy in Buddhism. What is most interesting, however, is in the dissemination of the Mundy's Lama's thoughts: it is through the theater.

Excerpt:"Ommony managed to master his emotions somehow, but it was not easy, for here was proof of a system of spying that out-spied the Secret Service.

Mundy, Talbot, 1879-1940. Modern fiction, Science Fiction - General, Fiction - Science Fiction, Fiction, Fantastic fiction. New York : Carroll & Graf. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AltheaB on May 22, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

eBook (PDF), 498 Pages. The central image of the book - the magical Ahbor jade stone - It is hoped that for those who are familiar with the story, this image wll bring to life the mystery of the Ahbor jade. And in turn, perhaps it will act as a prompt for those unacquainted with Mundy's masterpiece to read this wondrous novel and in effect take a mystical trek to Tibet where they, too, will learn "the secret of Ahbor Valley. How can I use this format?

Talbot Mundy's famous metaphysical novel is set in the Himalayas.

Talbot Mundy's famous metaphysical novel is set in the Himalayas.

Reviews:
  • Thordigda
Om, The Secret of Ahbor Valley was originally published in 1924. This is an excellent example of British, Late Imperial Adventure fiction. The twist Om offers, however, is it has a minor mystical element. Most of the book is concerned with Cottswold Ommony’s search for the Ahbor Valley and his experiences along the way—as well as the characters he meets on this quest.

What is interesting about Mundy now, is not the stories themselves—though fun they are run-of-the-mill early 20th Century adventure fiction—but the window the stories and books offer on Late British Imperialism, especially as this manifested itself in India.

The casual reader, however, should brace themselves for the imperialist perspective on the ‘native/indigenous peoples’. While Mundy’s racism is mild by comparison of, say, Ian Flemings’ [see Flemings’ James Bond series] it is pronounced by today’s standards. This doesn’t mean modern readers will not enjoy Mundy’s work, but it does mean the reader should prepare themselves for racial and cultural attitudes that are not acceptable today. Again, these attitudes are not as blatant as those of others writers and should not interfere, greatly, with the reader’s pleasure—if they keep the above proviso in mind.

Having said this, Om is a wonderful adventure story with mystical overtones and interesting historical observations. But, mostly, Om is a wonderful book filled with exotic and unusual characters.

The middle section of the book drags a bit, feels a bit overly long, but this may be because the reading sensibilities of the pre-internet and pre-television age are dramatically different from those of today.

Highly Recommended for those readers who enjoy Adventure fiction and those interested in Late Imperial Adventure fiction.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars.

Note: The reviewer read the Kindle eBook version of this book. The book was well formatted and easy to navigate through.

For those interested in learning more about Talbot Mundy, they should check out his Wikipedia page. Mr. Mundy led an interesting and unconventional life, which fed into his fiction and his perspective on the world.
  • thrust
I have read this book at least 50 times. It is one of my favorite books ever and no matter how many times I have read it,I always find something new each time I do. The writing, especially at the beginning, is so concentrated it is almost like poetry in prose form. It definitely helps to understand it if you have spent time in India, but that is not necessary and is most useful at the beginning of the book. Even though Om .was written nearly 100 years ago I feel like it could have been written yesterday. I felt that way when I first read it 50 years ago and I felt that way when I read it last week.

I don't think I can explain why this book has had such a powerful influence on me or seized my imagination the way it has. The writing is incredibly fine although possibly from another time like Jane Austen is from another time. Om is full of adventure and mysticism and vividly drawn characters and leaves one with a feeling of hope for the future without being preachy or in your face about it.

Try it. You might like it.
  • Fek
A fun book that inspired much follow on thinking, reading and research.

Basically 1920's pulp adventure with a little bit of spirituality (theosophy and his idea of Tibetan buddhism) thrown in. I found the writing unpleasant at the beginning, gradually improving in both style and competence as the book progressed. I found myself looking up the arcane words, the geography of the journey, as well as the history of India as I read, which provided far more depth to the experience.

I also was inspired to research pulp fiction of the time. Mundy is a classic practitioner and worthy of consideration for anyone interested In the genre.

Finally, the religous and spiritual aspects are thought provoking. I had a chance to discuss the book with a group well versed in the variety of religions touched upon, and the consensus was that, for an Englishman of his time, he did a fair job of interpreting what, for his readers, was an exotic set of beliefs.
  • Shalinrad
As an adventure novel, Om is dull. Granted, Mundy is a hell of a wordsmith but where in the action? The characters are well drawn and alive but they don't do anything until three fourths way through the book. Some critics consider "Om" Mundy's Magnum Opus. I do not. "King of the Khyber Rifles is a much better read." And yes I do "get it" Theosophy and Buddhism aside, it's damn dull. As the old saying goes, "If I wanted a message I'd read a fortune cookie." Great cure for insomnia. Been a long time since I've read a major work by an author I hated as much as this book.
  • Nikok
One of my very favorite books. If you are looking for an adventure that is mystical, thoughtful and exciting, read this book. It is a combination of The Raiders of the Lost Ark and Kim (by Rudyard Kipling). It is one of the few books that I could not put down. It was written in the early 1920's and tells the story of a British civil servant who goes off in search of his long lost sister-in-law who vanished years before in northern India. The plot also includes a mystical piece of jade, a very wise lama and a mysterious apprentice lama. The writing is intelligent. I like this Kindle edition as it has some footnotes that explain some of the references that are no longer common.
  • Wanenai
The single star is not indicative of the quality of the writing or story, it's for the absolutely horrid book design. Page margins are too small, page numbers start at the wrong spot, typographic rules are ignored. The book looks like no human could be bothered to notice the results of the computer output. No wonder no publisher is listed.
  • Dukinos
This is one of my most favorite books. I've already read it a few times and each time I read it, I enjoy it more. If you have any interest in the mystical, you won't be disappointed!
An interesting real life adventure story. It drags a bit at times but that's just a measure of its comprehensiveness