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Mantissa (Back Bay Books) download ebook

by John Fowles

Mantissa (Back Bay Books) download ebook
ISBN:
0316290270
ISBN13:
978-0316290272
Author:
John Fowles
Publisher:
Back Bay Books (August 4, 1997)
Language:
Pages:
208 pages
ePUB:
1803 kb
Fb2:
1271 kb
Other formats:
rtf azw mbr lit
Category:
Contemporary
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

Thank you for your support of the author’s rights

Thank you for your support of the author’s rights. Then, carefully examining what I was, and seeing that I could pretend that I had no body, that no outer world existed, and no place where I was; but that despite this I could not pretend that I did not exist; that, on the contrary, from the very fact that I was able to doubt the reality of the other things, it very.

Mantissa, on the other hand, was a departure from the author's more popular material and received . John Fowles (1926-2005) was educated at Oxford and subsequently lectured in English at universities in Greece and the UK.

Mantissa, on the other hand, was a departure from the author's more popular material and received only a marginal response (LJ 9/1/82). The success of his first novel, The Collector, published in 1963, allowed him to devote all his time to writing. His books include the internationally acclaimed and bestselling novels The Magus, The French Lieutenant's Woman, and Daniel Martin.

However, the author, John Fowles, carried his concept to an extreme; he pushed it a few chapters too far with excruciating redundancy. Thus, by the last chapter, I had lost all interest and had no desire to finish the book. A few chapters less, rounded out, in Fowles own fashion, would have made for wonderful novel, beginning to end.

Paperback, 208 pages.

In Mantissa (1982), a novelist awakes in the hospital with amnesia - and. Paperback, 208 pages. Published August 4th 1997 by Back Bay Books (first published 1982). I'm pretty sure that, given my more limited knowledge base then, I missed a lot of the subtlety and meaning of what it was all about. On the other hand, I got the impression that it was barely as subtle as a sledgehammer.

Back Bay Books; Mulholland Books; Jimmy Patterson Books; Little, Brown Spark. John Murray Brown, James Brown's son, took over when Augustus Flagg retired in 1884. In the 1890s, Little, Brown expanded into general publishing, including fiction. In 1896, it published Quo Vadis. Little, Brown and Company is an American publisher founded in 1837 by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown, and for close to two centuries has published fiction and nonfiction by American authors. Early lists featured Emily Dickinson's poetry and Bartlett's Familiar Quotations.

Back Bay Books is focused on the publication of the nation's best fiction and nonfiction. Forester's Hornblower novels, among many others, have given these classics fresh lives.

Find nearly any book by John Fowles (page 2). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Thomas Hardy's England. by Jo Draper, John Fowles. ISBN 9780224029742 (978-0-224-02974-2) Hardcover, Vintage/Ebury (A Division of Random House Group), 1984.

NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEAR: New York Times, Washington Post TOP TEN BOOKS OF THE YEAR: Los Angeles Times, Christian Science Monitor BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR: Wall Street Journal, NPR, Kirkus, Fresh Air (Maureen Corrigan), San Francisco Chronicle TOP TITLES FOR GIFT GIVING: Chicago Tribune. Longlisted for the 2015 National Book Award - and a nationwide bestseller.

We are the paperback imprint of Little, Brown and Company. LIFE AFTER LIFE kicks off this year's Tournament of Books-will Ursula Todd live to see the brackets?

We are the paperback imprint of Little, Brown and Company. LIFE AFTER LIFE kicks off this year's Tournament of Books-will Ursula Todd live to see the brackets? themorningnews. The Morning News Tournament of Books - Presented by Field Notes. Per recent tradition, we start today with a pre-Tournament playoff round so that everyone can use the restroom, get a drink, and take a seat before the daily competition really gets going this Thursday, March 6. Back Bay Books. 22 October 2013 · New York, NY, United States ·.

In Mantissa (1982), a novelist awakes in the hospital with amnesia -- and comes to believe that a beautiful female doctor is, in fact, his muse.
Reviews:
  • salivan
I do like Fowles' work (The Magus, French Lieutenant's Woman, The Collector) and this work was interesting - the incarnation of a muse in the mental palace of a writer mind. Playful and changing roles assumed by the muse and the ensuing scenarios were interesting to follow. In the end, however, a bit brief and shallow. Sex acts as a "generative" force in the male (writer) and female (muse/Erato) interactions in the evolving scenarios/scenes. I was left wanting more...from a powerful writer who has delivered much in prior works. As I consider it, Mantissa is an eponymous title for this work.
  • Goldenfang
John Fowles can be spectacular, but Mantissa is like being trapped in a streets that follow like a tedious argument of insidious intent. As the author dashes his brains on the subject of inspiration and proves that he is aware of Calvino and other challenges to his own metafictional control, he shows that he has not yet managed to digest, to control, to settle, the matter. Unfortunately, in the process, he betrays, over and again, the disequilibrium of conceiving of sex as other or self, of projecting onto the beloved the desires of the master. We go around, but we never move. We debate, but we do not learn. I are vexed, but we do not get exercise, I fear. I have loved Fowles's novels, but this is a crashing disappointment and a bit embarrassing.
  • Fenius
Fantastically emotive and evocative.
  • Thomand
Mantissa is a short, light romp through the writer's mind. There's no heavy subtext to mull over. There's no ponderous character development to follow. There's just Miles Green in his hospital room, which becomes other things, and Erato, the woman who is his muse. A few other characters lurk in orbit around the room, but the whole story takes place literally in the brain of Miles.

Most of the book is dialogue between Miles and Erato as he alternately romances and berates his muse, the essence of his creativity, and is repaid in kind. It's an animated metaphor for the process of writing, and many times the characters seem to know they are merely characters in a book. It begins in a hospital where Miles has just recovered, having lost his memory through some accident, but that scenario quickly ends as Erato takes on numerous personalities and attitudes in her interaction with Miles.

This is probably best for those familiar with John Fowles's other works. Mantissa is clever, it's funny, it's self-aware, and it's not going to shake the literary world. It's just a quick afternoon read that gives you a peek into the mind of a writer.
  • Debeme
John Fowles minus his usual novelistic costuming relaxes, writes brilliantly, reveals craft secrets, pokes gentle, if firm, fun at both himself & the business of literature, adores/insults his muse & is properly inspired/kicked for his trouble. MANTISSA is sweetly funny, roughly true, a deft tale of the endless left/right (or male/female or rational/intuitive) mind combat which is the natural environment of creation, the brainswamp from which much of our best writing emerges. Complete with a terribly nice pun on the names of a writer & a shrink, adequate eros (every bit of it strictly imaginary), & some charming intermusine backbiting, in the end. Astounding! Hilarious! The Nubile Prize for Metafiction!
  • Djang
"Mantissa", is a meta-fictional curiosity that makes for an interesting read. I enjoyed the symbolic room which brought the reader into the fictional writer's brain. There he conversed, warred and made love with his fictional female character in ping pong fashion. One minute he had the upper hand, the next moment she did; back and forth it proceeded until, in the end, they both fell helplessly into each other's arms. Her character changed repeatedly, from a Goth boi to a demur, sensitive young girl. In the end, it could be said that the fictional male writer was at war with his inner male and female self. For the most part it was a fun, if not neurotic read. However, the author, John Fowles, carried his concept to an extreme; he pushed it a few chapters too far with excruciating redundancy. Thus, by the last chapter, I had lost all interest and had no desire to finish the book. A few chapters less, rounded out, in Fowles own fashion, would have made for wonderful novel, beginning to end.
  • Envias
Fun from beginning to end, John Fowles explores the never-smooth relationship between the author and his muse. Miles Green verbally and physically jousts for 200+ pages with his muse, Erato, as well as Dr. A. Delfie and the voluptuous Nurse Cory. If this doesn't excite you, I don't know what will. Extra fillips of pleasure for those who detest various sorts of modern criticism. It's a wonder John Fowles' Twaynes English Author Series Volume hasn't been recalled. He does not spare the rod. A warm, funny, smart book.
Many books have been labelled "verbal masturbation", but this is the real thing. John Fowles indulges his sexual and literary fantasies, entering them from every angle he can manage until he expends himself. What results is not "one man's interaction with his muse" as one review called it, but unreadable and pretentious and not remotely sexy subporn... that wouldn't have been publicised - or noticed - if they hadn't come from someone as well known as Fowles.
Some of the parts, such as his encounter with a black nurse, and a guitar wielding dominatrix muse read like something out of a bored private schoolboy's diary.
It's a pity, because John Fowles was once a great writer... but this book and "Daniel Martin" do him a great disservice.
Mercifully short, and that's it's one bonus.