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The Return of the Soldier download ebook

by Rebecca West

The Return of the Soldier download ebook
ISBN:
1609421108
ISBN13:
978-1609421106
Author:
Rebecca West
Publisher:
Lits (October 21, 2010)
Language:
Pages:
102 pages
ePUB:
1921 kb
Fb2:
1441 kb
Other formats:
lit docx mobi rtf
Category:
Classics
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

Author: Rebecca West. The return of the soldier -c- printed in the united states of america.

Author: Rebecca West. Release Date: August 24, 2011. net (This book was produced from scanned images of public domain material from the Google Print project. List of illustrations. He lay there in the confiding relaxation of a child.

George h. doran company. I oughtn't to do it, ought I?" 176. The return of the soldier. Chapter I. "Ah, don't begin to fuss!" wailed Kitty. The return of the soldier C printed in the united states of america.

Rebecca West, The Return of the SoldierHaving fought in World War One, 35-year-old Chris Baldry finally returns home. Believing he’s 20 years old, he is shocked when he finds out the he actually has a wife and that his childhood sweetheart is already married with another man. He slowly realizes the passing of time but he can’t remember anything from his last 15 years. This eBook also contains a bonus book club leadership guide and discussion questions.

Rebecca West was apparently the first woman to write of the Great War. And this taut short novel from 1918 tells of Chris, a young English soldier . The beauty of the book is how perfectly West envelops the reader in the dilemma

Rebecca West was apparently the first woman to write of the Great War. And this taut short novel from 1918 tells of Chris, a young English soldier with memory loss, robbing him of the last 15 years. The beauty of the book is how perfectly West envelops the reader in the dilemma. I’ll only say that the story is about a soldier returned from the war with amnesia. He no longer remembers his wife.

The debut novel of English novelist Rebecca West, first published in 1918. The novel recounts the return of the shell-shocked Captain Chris Baldry from the trenches of the First World War from the perspective of his cousin Jenny. The novel grapples with the soldier's return from World War I with mental trauma and its effects on the family, and the light it sheds on their fraught relationships.

Return of a Soldier is British writer Rebecca West’s first novelette. The book may be considered a novella or short story that covers over 90 pages of a series of flashbacks of memories to piece together Chris’s mindset

Return of a Soldier is British writer Rebecca West’s first novelette. It was published in 1918, during World War I and is about the war, or more precisely, the effects the war had on civilians on the Homefront and soldiers on the battlefield. The book may be considered a novella or short story that covers over 90 pages of a series of flashbacks of memories to piece together Chris’s mindset. And with Jenny’s helpful narration of the story, she provides clarity, but even with that in mind, there is a bit of complexity that emerges within each short chapter.

by. West, Rebecca, Dame, 1892-.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. by. Garden City Pub. Co. Collection.

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. This is the best-known West’s novel. The story is told by a spinster whose whole life revolves around her cousin, his life and country mansion. This is the story of an English gentleman who goes off . .o World War I only to be returned not in a body bag or physically injured but with a severe case of amnesia. He does not recognize his pretty, smart wife; starts a youthful affair with a poor woman who is also married. The woman comes forth in the interest of helping him. The balance of the plot hangs in the consequences of recovery.

The Return of the Soldier is a novel by English novelist Rebecca West regarding Captain Chris Baldry, a soldier whose reintegration to the British mainstream society is not easy, after he returns home during The First World War.
Reviews:
  • Azago
This is the debut novel of Rebecca West. It was composed during World War I and set in World War I. It is about a soldier returning home having suffered from "shell shock". As one can imagine his family suffers along with him.

The narrator is a female cousin who has very high regard for the soldier. The style is Early Post Victorian, and there is no crass language whatsoever. A modern American reader may find the style somewhat dated. Personally I very much like Victorian and Post Victorian literature and really enjoyed this novel.

I purchased both and audiobook and read along on Kindle. The audiobook was more descriptive than the Kindle. They were very similar but not identical and I much preferred the audiobook.

The narrator of my audiobook was Nadia May. Nadia May happens to be one of my favorite narrators and is my favorite narrator for George Eliot Novels. The reason I mention this is that this novel really reminds me of George Eliot, who is my favorite author. I cannot help but wonder if my perception is affected by Nadia May being the narrator.

The novel also reminds me of the early novels of Virginia Wolff. Specifically I am thinking of "The Voyage Out", "Night And Day", and "Jacob's Room". In that Rebecca West reminded me of both George Eliot and Virginia Wolff, I absolutely intend to study her further and read more of her works. Thank You...
  • Sudert
“Return of a Soldier“ is British writer Rebecca West’s first novelette. It was published in 1918, during World War I and is about the war, or more precisely, the effects the war had on civilians on the Homefront and soldiers on the battlefield. It conveys the story of Chris, a soldier who was shell shocked on the battlefield; Kitty, his wife; Jenny, his cousin; and Margaret, his long-ago sweetheart. Chris, upon his return home, has little idea who Kitty and Jenny are, and their importance they have in his life, yet it is Margaret whom he remembers and has feelings towards. Moreover, he believes the present time is fifteen years prior, and that he and Margaret are still in their twenties, not in the reality that they are “middle aged” in their mid-thirties and married to other people.

We discover that even though a soldier suffers from shell shock, the effects bleed over to others in his life. They agonize, too, as this story shows, and to “return a soldier” to reality so as to return him to the front, is to also send the civilian to another battlefield, albeit a psychological one. The ending is compelling, and most likely will cause the reader to ponder its deeper meaning.

This novelette is delightfully written, with flowing syntax and descriptions of nature and home settings that are strikingly real. What makes this story so enjoyable, is the first person narration by Jenny, whose language ebbs and flows is such pretty, undulating sentences, that the reader feels and shares in her observations and emotions.

I really like this novelette. It is very well-written with a topic that is as apropos today as it was a century ago, and its length (about 116 pages) is manageable in one or two reading sessions.
  • Yannara
'The Return of the Soldier' is a short novel which describes the impact of a shell-shocked World War 1 officer's return on the lives of three women who love him. Chris Baldry is a man in his mid-thirties, so he has a past, some of which seems eliminated in his memory by his trauma. Although he remembers his cousin Jenny from childhood, he has no recall of his wife Kitty. His mind seems stuck at the age of 20, at which time he had a summer romance with an innkeeper's daughter, Margaret.

The story is narrated by the unmarried Jenny, who obviously has had an unrequited crush on her cousin since her childhood. She and Kitty share an appalling snobbery, which is deluged upon the unfortunate and rather plain Margaret: "Wealdstone. That is the name of the red suburban stain which fouls the field three miles nearer London than Harrowweald." "She was not so much a person as an implication of dreary poverty, like an open door in a mean house that lets out the smell of cooking cabbage and the screams of children." But these bitchy and catty (though very entertaining) insults say rather more about Jenny than they do about Margaret.

As time goes on, and Jenny observes the effect that his lost love has on Chris, she gradually sees Margaret's goodness and wisdom, and the once drab woman is revealed as near-saintly.

I enjoyed the book very much. Some of the writing is a touch too flowery for my liking, but there are some gorgeous passages, particularly those recalling the young couple on Monkey Island ("not a place but a magic state") in a golden summer, before the horrors of the Great War.

The ending is a little too sudden and convenient for me, but I think it does leave the question: was 'curing' Chris really in his best interests, and those of the three women?