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Darkness at Noon download ebook

by Arthur Koestler

Darkness at Noon download ebook
ISBN:
0025652109
ISBN13:
978-0025652101
Author:
Arthur Koestler
Publisher:
Scribner (August 30, 1987)
Language:
Pages:
288 pages
ePUB:
1654 kb
Fb2:
1347 kb
Other formats:
docx lrf mbr rtf
Category:
Classics
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. The Grammatical Fiction.

This book is a work of fiction. Any resemblance to actual events or locales or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental. Nobody can rule guiltlessly.

Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015. author: Arthur koestler d. ontributor. te: 0000-00-00 d. ate. citation: 1948 d. dentifier. origpath: 44 d. copyno: 1 d.

Arthur Koestler (1905-1983) was a Hungarian-British author and journalist who immersed himself in the major ideological and social conflicts of his time.

Ships from and sold by PB Sales. Arthur Koestler (1905-1983) was a Hungarian-British author and journalist who immersed himself in the major ideological and social conflicts of his time. In 1931 Koestler joined the Communist Party of Germany until, disillusioned by Stalinism, he resigned in 1938. In 1940 he published his novel Darkness at Noon, an anti-totalitarian work that gained him international fame. Over the course of his life, Koestler espoused many political causes.

Darkness at Noon (German: Sonnenfinsternis) is a novel by Hungarian-born British novelist Arthur Koestler, first published in 1940

Darkness at Noon (German: Sonnenfinsternis) is a novel by Hungarian-born British novelist Arthur Koestler, first published in 1940. His best known work, it is the tale of Rubashov, an Old Bolshevik who is arrested, imprisoned, and tried for treason against the government that he helped to create.

In America, it was a best-seller and a Book-of-the-Month Club selection, and was soon adapted into a hit Broadway play.

Darkness at Noon is as gripping as a thriller and a seminal work of twentieth-century literature. Arthur Koestler was born in Budapest in 1905. He attended the University of Vienna before working as a foreign correspondent in the Middle East, Berlin and Paris

Darkness at Noon is as gripping as a thriller and a seminal work of twentieth-century literature. He attended the University of Vienna before working as a foreign correspondent in the Middle East, Berlin and Paris. For six years he was an active member of the Communist Party, and was captured by Franco in the Spanish Civil War.

Darkness at Noon is an authentic and chilling look at Stalin's Russia in the late 1930s. Arthur Koestler, formerly a member of the Communist Party, completed this superb historical fiction in Paris as WWII was just beginning

Darkness at Noon is an authentic and chilling look at Stalin's Russia in the late 1930s. Arthur Koestler, formerly a member of the Communist Party, completed this superb historical fiction in Paris as WWII was just beginning. In a short forward he says that the characters in this book are fictitious, but that the historical circumstances which determined their actions are real.

Koestler's black indictment of Stalin's police state helped to alter the 20th century's intellectual climate. Sadly it's all too relevant today. The whole image is pervaded with a blue so dark it's practically black. A suited man is sitting at a table. The vertical lines of the curtains behind him seem to be the bars of a cell – he is perhaps a prisoner facing interrogation.

10/27/2010 09:54 PM. Koestler, Arthur - Darkness at Noon. Discorsi Man, man, one cannot live quite without pity. DOSTOEVSKY: Crime and Punishment The characters in this book are fictitious.

N. S. Rubashov, an old guard Communist, falls victim to an unnamed government; with outstanding psychological insight, Koestler traces his story through arrest, imprisonment and trail in a classic novel which, when first published, famously drew attention to the nature of Stalin's regime.
Reviews:
  • Ghordana
I have for many years known of this book and what it portrayed; that, similar to Orwell's "Animal Farm "and "1984", it's a condemnation of communism from a disillusioned, former party-member, but now having read it for the first time only recently, I can say how delightfully impressed I am with the brilliance of the writing and the incisiveness of the political and psychological analysis. If you're familiar with the "Red Terror" in the Soviet Union in the 1930s, with Stalin's purge and liquidation of hundreds of thousands including many in the party leadership (Lenin's old comrades), and with the public show trials many were forced to undergo, you might have wondered, as I have, why did almost all the old communists (Bolsheviks) publicly confess to such unbelievable crimes as participation in vast conspiracies, some involving foreign powers, to assassinate Stalin and his cronies, or to "wreck" whole industries, or to link with Trotsky and overthrow the Soviet government. You might think the NKVD's application of physical torture is sufficient to answer this question, but Koestler and "Darkness at Noon" reveal other reasons, perhaps more troubling and fearful, that might explain why former revolutionaries and convinced Marxist-Leninists would debase and humiliate themselves in such a public manner.

The novel has three main characters: Rubashov, a high-ranking and influential member of the party who's arrested at the beginning of the novel, Ivanov, his former friend and colleague and high-ranking security official who's appointed to interrogate him, and Gletkin, another interrogator who contrasts Ivanov's cynicism with an apparatchik's "true believer" mentality. The focus of the novel is Rubashov's imprisonment, his reminiscences, and primarily Ivanov's and Gletkin's efforts to get him to confess to conspire to assassinate "No. 1" and other disloyal crimes against the state. What makes "Darkness" work so well for me is that Rubashov is no admirable, "closet" liberal. He has in fact sacrificed party members in the past who have deviated from the "party line" and believes, even up to the end, that "personal liberty and social progress are incompatible." But he's intelligent and has seen enough of Marxism-Leninism in power, or the Stalinist variation of it, to be aware of its human costs, although he seems to think, like Ivanov, that these human costs are transitional. After all, the party has taught him, and they all seem to agree, that "the only morality refers to social utility" and the end justifies the means. But for some reason he's perceived as dangerous and part of the "opposition" within the party (Lenin eliminated the opposition outside the party), and so he's arrested.

Ivanov is also intelligent, and a cynical high-ranking security official, and it's fascinating to see his almost gentle, but very psychological and political, approach to secure Rubashov's confession. Rubashov knows he's a dead man once he's arrested and seems to have a fatalistic view and no fear of physical distress. Rubashov's initial disinclination to confess is mocked by Ivanov; he tells him that personal heroism is personal vanity and he seems to agree since Marxist-Leninists only recognize social utility as a moral or positive goal. The party's hold on Rubashov is unending; he has taken "the vows of his order" (i.e., the party) and even his death must not subvert the party's goals but enhance them. I found the dialogue between Rubashov and Ivanov in the "Second Examination" to be evocative of the dialogue between Ivan and Alyosha in Dostoyevsky's "The Grand Inquisitor" and almost as brilliant. In both dialogues, one side advocates improving the future well-being of the "masses" at the cost of the present, and of human freedom as well as the need to eliminate heretics, both religious and political, while the other side seems to be wary of human utopianism and social engineering; of course, Rubashov lacks Alyosha's innocence and religious faith. But hear the cynical Ivanov denounce human feeling: "One may not regard the world as a sort of metaphysical brothel for emotions. That is the first commandment for us (i.e., party members). Sympathy, conscience, disgust, despair, repentance, and atonement are for us repellent debauchery." That's writing!
  • Jeb
Arthur Koestler (1905-suicide in 1983) was born in Budapest in 1905. He was a member of the Communist Party from 1931-38 and was condemned to death by Franco during the Spanish Civil War. He survived that scary ordeal. Koestler became a British citizen and died after having reading a teeming bookshelf of novels and autobiographical works. Darkness at Noon is considered one of the greatest books of the twentieth century residing on a shelf with such classics as George Orwell's 1984.
The story tells the tale of Nicolas Rubashov. He has been arrested for a supposed assassination plot against the leader of the totalitarian nation. No nations or leaders are mentioned but it is obvious the leader is Stalin. The book recounts the thoughts and arguments engaged in between Rubashov and the two men who force him to confess to an assassination attempt of which he is innocent. The novel is a disquisition on philosophical and political questions . Rubashov has been a high official in the government but has been betrayed and brought to the end of his life.
He has flashbacks from his past and dialogues with fellow prisoners. The book could be read many times and is an excellent work for college classes dealing with dictatorships. The novel was published in 1940 and has become a modern classic. Highly recommended.
  • Faulkree
Rubashov is a high party official, one of the first generation of communist revolutionaries who accompanied Stalin to power in the 1920’s. Once lauded as a hero, he now finds himself condemned as a counter-revolutionary in the Moscow show trials of the 1930’s. Sitting with him in his cell, we see the world from his point of view and experience his resignation and rationalization. We accompany him on his journey to false confession and death.

Full of cold poetry and biting significance, Koestler’s novel is a cautionary tale about the dangers of twisting reality to suit preconception. Throughout, the words “history” and “sleep” are repeated over and over, resonating like the drum beat that precedes the execution of each of the jailed counter-revolutionaries awaiting their fates in the cells of the “state”.

This is a book that teaches much to those willing to listen. Sadly, I fear, that with the downfall of communism it has been relegated to the shelf, as if the final judgment on that flawed exercise has rendered it unnecessary. Nothing could be further from the truth. Political policies born of self-delusion, intolerance and paranoia are with us now as much as ever. Koestler has shown us the dire consequences of allowing such policies to take hold. Shame on us if we ignore the eloquent warning he has left us.
  • Wnex
This one book is perhaps the most damning indictment of the one party system, the Soviet system, and the "compulsion to conform" ever penned. Poe couldn't have done better, as far as bleakness of plot goes. It's difficult to even relay the impression this work leaves on the reader, as it's subtle and psychological, yet devoid of hope and achingly dark... Sort of like being in Hell while still on earth; every action judged, every innocent mistake turned into a plot against the state. Unbelievable! Anyone who thinks totalitarian systems have any human virtue should read this book. Mr. Koestler was once enamoured of the Soviet system but was, as was Orwell, honest enough to admit he'd been mistaken as the poisonous orchid of the USSR spread its foetid tendrils into every aspect of existence...
  • Frey
Do ends justify the means, or should the means be justified in and of of themselves?
I think that is the most pertinent question this book should make us ponder. The life of the protagonist, who earlier believed the former, but realized over time the truth in the latter, is what this book presents.
Of course, I have heard some people say that Animal Farm is a book about pigs on a farm; and likewise the point of this book too will be missed, if you don't have some background of the Stalinist takeover of Russia.