cerkalo
» » The Sappho Companion

The Sappho Companion download ebook

by Margaret Reynolds

The Sappho Companion download ebook
ISBN:
0701165863
ISBN13:
978-0701165864
Author:
Margaret Reynolds
Publisher:
Chatto & Windus; First Edition edition (2000)
Language:
ePUB:
1237 kb
Fb2:
1213 kb
Other formats:
lrf mobi lrf rtf
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

Margaret Reynolds is a writer, academic, critic and broadcaster: her previous books include The Penguin Book of Lesbian Stories, Erotica and Victorian Women Poets: An Anthology. She is a Visiting Fellow at Clare Hall, Cambridge. Библиографические данные.

Margaret Reynolds is a writer, academic, critic and broadcaster: her previous books include The Penguin Book of Lesbian Stories, Erotica and Victorian Women Poets: An Anthology. The Sappho Companion.

The Sappho Companion book. Details (if other): Cancel.

sex toy in Margaret Reynold's exhaustive The Sappho Companion, a book that goes beyond mere anthology. Yet everything is so up in the air that Reynolds feels it relevant to mention, in her introduction, her friend who had a cat called Sappho.

Nicholas Lezard takes a look at contributions ranging from Pound's "Papyrus" to Jeanette Winterson's sex toy in Margaret Reynold's exhaustive The Sappho Companion, a book that goes beyond mere anthology. She liked to sleep high up on top of the kitchen cupboards, from where she would take a flying leap on to the floor. but I do know that Kate's other cat was called Mrs Pankhurst.

Born around 630 BC on the Greek Island of Lesbos, Sappho is the greatest lyrical poet of Greece, and one of the greatist artists of any age. Her poems exist only as fragments, and her life is not much more than speculation, but Sappho's pull-as writer, voice, and image-affects every era. Ovid, Baudelaire, and Jeanette Winterson are just a few of the writers who, each generation, claim Sappho as their own.

Includes translations of the Greek fragments of Sappho's poems. Originally published: London : Constable, 2000. Complete list of extracts": p. 403-409. Includes bibliographical references (p. 397-402) and index. I ask only once a year: please help the Internet Archive today. All we need is the price of a paperback book to sustain a non-profit.

Who is Sappho? Lesbian, mother poet, lover, suicide warning, and icon. In this innovative blend of personal reflection and cultural history Margaret Reynolds illuminates Sappho's genius, her life, her sexuality, and the extraordinary influence she has had across centuries. Built on key themes, this book features a rich offering of poems, plays, essays, and stories by leading writers that bring Sappho's legacy to life.

A space for joining up the dots," says Reynolds, who had the brilliant idea of drawing together Sapphic translations and . Through her surviving fragments of lyric verse are still potent, we know little of Sappho

A space for joining up the dots," says Reynolds, who had the brilliant idea of drawing together Sapphic translations and inspirations. The resulting collage is a triumph, from her early traducement by Ovid, who moulded her into "a sententious elderly bluestocking", through Pope's jibes. Through her surviving fragments of lyric verse are still potent, we know little of Sappho. A space for joining up the dots," says Reynolds, who had the brilliant idea of drawing together Sapphic translations and inspirations.

With "The Sappho Companion," British critic Margaret Reynolds has collected bits and pieces of all these Sapphos into a single, diverting volume. The book is like a plate assembled at a vast literary buffet - a dab of this, a morsel of that, the sweet, the salty, the delectable, the piquant and, occasionally, the cloying. This piecemeal presentation is apropos, since all we have of Sappho's 2,600-year-old poems are 213 fragments gathered from rotting papyri rescued from antique rubbish heaps and, in the form of quotations, gleaned from later works.

In The Sappho History, Margaret Reynolds traces the story of the . Her publications include The Sappho Companion, Victorian Women Poets (with Angela Leighton) and The Penguin Book of Lesbian Short Stories.

In The Sappho History, Margaret Reynolds traces the story of the reception of Sappho's poetry and her afterlife in literature and art from the mid eighteenth-century to the twentieth-century.

Reviews:
  • Uafrmaine
This is a lovely and loving book on the ways Sappho's poems and the stories about her have been received and reinterpreted by the generations since she wrote. Reynolds discusses the general trends of each period, analyzes how Sappho's work resonated both as a cultural touchstone and in the works of poets and authors of the period; after this, she presents portions (or entirety, in some cases) of the works she has discussed, so that the reader may check her claims and appreciate the works. There are also artworks and some discussion of Sappho as a musical subject.
Very readable, and useful as a companion to readings of Sappho's works, especially if one is exploring two excellent contemporary readings with notes--the Anne Carson and Diane Rayor translations.
  • Thordira
If you're a Sappho fan, you get everything in this book: her poems and fragments in the original Greek, followed by renderings by poets from Catullus and Ovid onward; her history, as much as is known; commentary on her by writers through the ages; and others' poems based on her work. The extant body of Sappho's work is so slender that the heart aches for what was lost; but these musings, analyses, and celebrations down through the ages help round out our image of her.
  • Cordann
Are you wondering about the poet Sappho" the poet the Greek & Roman people revered and respected for her beautiful poetry? Read this book, it unlocks the doors on the life & beauty of the talented "Sappho" a wonder with words that can touch or pierce your heart.
Blessings,
Donna Swindells
  • Uris
I don't know what the previous reviewer is talking about; I loved this book. Granted, I am no scholar of Sappho. Although I have read various translations of her poetry in the past, I do not read Greek and cannot comment upon whether Reynolds' research is accurate. However, given her amazing previous work (editing Aurora Leigh, the Penguin Book of Lesbian Short Stories, etc.) I am inclined to trust her (and I like her writing style anyway).
For me, this book was the perfect introduction to Sappho. It includes historical background followed by many of Sappho's fragments in a variety of translations. But that's just the beginning: Reynolds goes on to show how Sappho has been imagined/created by literature up to the present day. She anthologizes a variety of poems, plays, and fictions inspired by Sappho. It is amazing to see how, though so little of her writing survived, she has remained a titaness in our imaginations. Each literary generation has reinvented and recreated her. Reading Jeanette Winterson's amazing story "The Poetics of Sex" (narrated by a modern-day Sappho) fills me with hope and joy at the potential for lesbian creativity that is Sappho's legacy. I also appreciated the inclusion of works of art depicting Sappho through the ages. Although they are in black and white, they are an exquisite visual touch to this beautiful volume (the cover art is amazing as well).
I urge you not to judge this book by one bad review. It is a book to be perused at leisure, to leaf through in times of anxious sorrow and contemplative joy. Buy or borrow a copy and judge it for yourself.
  • Azago
I don't know for whom this book may have been written. For the Sapphophile, there are certainly more exhaustive and interesting books, some are which are noted in the bibliography at the end. Furthermore, for all the treacly editorial reviews about Ms. Reynolds's scholarly resources (which are certainly evident), she abuses them time and time again in two ways, one merely bothersome, and the other approaching dishonesty. 1.)She frequently truncates the passages from other authors just when they begin to get interesting. 2) She frequently selects works of literature, particularly poems, that may or may not have anything to do with Sappho and offers no solid evidence that they do. They are, I guess, Sapphic by association. Reynolds's association. The two most obvious examples are Shelley's "To Constantia, Singing" and Emily Dicknson's ""Heaven"- Is What I Cannot Reach!" To take the latter as a case in point, the poem is supposed to be Sapphic because of a three line Sappho fragment (#105) about an apple on the topmost bough. Need I remind everyone that there was another apple on a bough in another book that has a far more rich cultural history. And given that Dickinson's poem concerns "Heaven" and "Paradise," it seems a stretch, so to speak, to see the poem as influenced by the Sapphic fragment. Truth be known, I spent many more hours meditating on Ms. Dickinson's exquisite 15 line poem than I did in reading the rest of the entire hodgepodge of this book, though I plodded through from srart to finish.
So, my advice is to buy a book of Ms. Dickinson's poems or a more intriguing and honest study of Sappho. This book is just a non-starter.