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Ghost of Chance download ebook

by William S. Burroughs

Ghost of Chance download ebook
ISBN:
1852424060
ISBN13:
978-1852424060
Author:
William S. Burroughs
Publisher:
Serpent's Tail/High Risk Books; 1st Trade edition (September 1, 1995)
Language:
Pages:
96 pages
ePUB:
1408 kb
Fb2:
1538 kb
Other formats:
mbr lrf lrf rtf
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

Ghost of Chance is a novella by William S. Burroughs

Ghost of Chance is a novella by William S. Burroughs.

Ghost of Chance book. Born in 1914, William S. Burroughs is the author of Junky, Naked Lunch and The Soft Machine and many other contemporary classics. A major figure of 20th century American literature, Burroughs died in 1997.

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by. Burroughs, William . 1914-1997. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

by. Internet Archive Books.

Ghost of Chance "is an adventure story set in the jungle of Madagascar and filled with the obsessions that mark the work of the man who Norman Mailer once called, 'the only American writer possessed by genius.

From the strange and venerable Burroughs, a tiny slip of a book (to include 17 illustrations by the author) that . Burroughs, in all, as the high lyric poet of wretched lost hopes. Or maybe not wholly lost: At book's end is an address, with an appeal for funds to help save the lemurs.

From the strange and venerable Burroughs, a tiny slip of a book (to include 17 illustrations by the author) that becomes a cri de coeur for ecological sanity. In his spare, comic-hook style, Burroughs opens by telling-or telegraphing-the story of one Captain Mission who, in the 18th century, founded a "free pirate settlement, Libertatia, on the west coast of Madagascar.

William S. Burroughs, Ghost of Chance. Ghost of Chance, a novella of less than sixty pages published in 1991 as part of the High Risk Books/Serpent’s Tail series, is a tale of adventure set in the Madagascar jungle

William S. Last summer at a street fair in Portland, Oregon one of the booths displayed a banner: Stop Breeding. I picked up one of their postcards, which read: Not having kids may be the best thing you can do for the environment. Reading Ghost of Chance, author William S. Burroughs is undoubtedly of similar mind. Ghost of Chance, a novella of less than sixty pages published in 1991 as part of the High Risk Books/Serpent’s Tail series, is a tale of adventure set in the Madagascar jungle. If you look hard you might detect the bare outline of plot.

Author(s): William S. Title: Ghost of Chance (High Risk Books). Ghost of Chance by William S. Burroughs (Paperback, 2002). Pre-owned: lowest price. The book is structured as a series of loosely connected vignettes. In Naked Lunch, William S. Burroughs revealed his genius. In The Soft Machine he begins an adventure that will take us even further into the dark recesses of his imagination, a region where nothing is sacred, nothing taboo. Continuing his ferocious verbal assault on hatred, hype, poverty, war, bureaucracy, and addiction in all its forms, Burroughs gives us a surreal space odyssey through the wounded galaxies in a book only he could create.

Tells the story of Captain Mission who set up a "free pirate" settlement on the west coast of Madagascar and attempted to protect the gentle lemurs that also lived there
Reviews:
  • Bedy
“Panic is the sudden realization that everything around you is alive.” William S. Burroughs, Ghost of Chance

Last summer at a street fair in Portland, Oregon one of the booths displayed a banner: “Stop Breeding.” I picked up one of their postcards, which read: “Not having kids may be the best thing you can do for the environment.”

Reading Ghost of Chance, author William S. Burroughs is undoubtedly of similar mind. He alerts readers that on the island of Madagascar the human population is growing out of control (as of today, nearly thirty years after the author’s warning, the human population is twenty-five million strong). Meanwhile deforestation on the island continues apace - mining, logging, wood for fuel, along with the major culprit, slash-and-burn for agricultural, has reduced a once spacious jungle overflowing with life down to next to nothing.

Ghost of Chance, a novella of less than sixty pages published in 1991 as part of the High Risk Books/Serpent’s Tail series, is a tale of adventure set in the Madagascar jungle. If you look hard you might detect the bare outline of plot. But don’t look too hard, for the author’s artistry isn't so much in linear narrative as in well-tuned observations on the plight of modern homo no so sapiens expressed in tough, hardline Burroughs-ese.

This being the case, here are six direct quotes, six Benzedrine Bill tabs, along with my comments in the hope that you get hooked enough to read this short work from the master of Naked Lunch and The Soft Machine:

“The Lemur People are older than Homo Sap, much older. They date back one hundred sixty million years, to the time when Madagascar split off from the mainland of Africa. Their way of thinking and feeling is basically different from ours, not oriented toward time and sequence and causality. They find these concepts repugnant and difficult to understand.” ---------- The word lemur derives from the word lemures (ghosts or spirits) from Roman mythology. Thus the strong connection between lemurs and the book's title. Captain Mission, the tale’s protagonist, possesses a strong affinity with the lemurs of Madagascar. For millions of years prior to the arrival of humans on the island, some lemurs grew to the size of gorillas. Lemurs have always enjoyed a great diversity. Even today, after the destruction by humans of vast tracts of jungle, there remains over one hundred species of lemurs.

“Mission set out walking rapidly. Half an hour later, he took a small amount of the crystals with a sip of water from his goatskin water-bag. In a few minutes he experienced a shift of vision, as if his eyes were moving on separate pivots, and for the first time he saw Lizard-Who-Changed-Color.” ---------- As readers we have come to expect any work of Burroughs to be chock-full of drugs of some variety. Here Captain Mission takes a specialty of Madagascar producing in him visions akin to a shaman on a vision question. Indeed, many the time reading Ghost of Chance I linked the insights of Burroughs with the world of Shamanism.

“Time is a human affliction; not a human invention but a prison. . . . And what does time mean to foraging lemurs? No predators here, not much to fear. They have opposing thumbs but do not fashion tools; they have no need for tools. They are untouched by the evil that flows in and fills Homo Sap as he picks up a weapon – now he has the advantage. A terrible gloating feeling comes from knowing you’ve got it!" ---------- The author detects Homo Sap’s rage and resentment at having being cast out of the present by the sickness of time. Not a happy combination – a species on the planet with seething, bitter anger combined with all those powerful weapons. Watch out animals and plants, here comes Homo Saps, an instrument of mass destruction and extermination!

Beauty is always doomed. Homo Sap with his weapons, his time, his insatiable greed, and ignorance so hideous it can never see its own face. Man is born in time. He lives and dies in time. Wherever he goes, he takes time with him and imposes time.” ---------- In a footnote William Burroughs asks if Homo Sap thinks other animals were there just for him to eat. I hear echoes of poet Gary Snyder observing when the Protestants came to America they judged the natural world as the stage for man working out his relationship to God. (Women and children being inferior versions of man). The animals and trees and lakes and rivers were but stage props. So, to answer your question, William S. Burroughs – yes, many peoples and cultures hold that animals exist for one sole purpose – food for the table!

"To distract their charges from the problems of overpopulation, resource depletion, deforestation, pandemic pollution of water, land, and sky, they inaugurated a war against drugs. This provides a pretext to set up an international police apparatus designed to suppress dissidence on an international level." ---------- I can just imagine what this statement sounds like when read in William S. Burroughs' gritty, gravelly voice. Can come off as a bit preachy but it does ring of truth. In another footnote, it is stated that a high ranking U.S. official said anyone who suggests a tolerant attitude toward drug use should be considered a traitor. Of course he wasn't thinking of those large corporations distributing millions of pills to get people hooked so their profits skyrocket. OxyContin flooding small towns in the US is but one example.

“Whoever needed a majority? Ten percent plus the police and military is all it ever took. Besides, we’ve got the media, hook, line, and blinkers.” ---------- Wise words, Bill! Nowadays in 2018 the powers that be can even chortle, cackle and yodel as they make this pronouncement. After all, they have a long standing track record of success going for them.
  • Went Tyu
Another book from the master William S Burroughs. I was surprised to find this lost gem on Amazon as I have been a long time fan of all of William S Burroughs's work but had never seen or heard of this book. My only complaint is this is a very short and quick read (58 pages) but a good book and a great bargain as a used book. I only paid 1 cent plus shipping for my copy which was in great condition and is now sits proudly among my William S Burroughs library.
  • Walianirv
There's nothing bad about this book. Wherever it goes threadbare it makes up for it every time. Forces you to think more.
  • Humin
Another installation in Burroughs twisted view of the world...
  • Gardagar
I bought this as background information for a trip to Madagascar. However, after trying to read through it a couple times I finally walked away from it. It seemed to fall more into the category of dark, artsy literature than a characterization of the country, people or geography. To me seemed more of chore than a pleasure to read.
  • Fararala
Great book. Weirdly wonderful and a taste of why Kurt Cobain was so enthralled with him. Two thumbs up.
  • Xtani
This is the first book by Burroughs I've read, and one I found quite disturbing. If this is one of his minor efforts, I just wonder what effect the most respected thomes in the Burroughs canon would have on me.
"Ghost of Chance" deals with extinction, both of animal species due to human stupidity and of man by exotic plagues. And that's just a simplified description. Burroughs adds commentary on Christianity, language as an evolutionary evil and man's stuborness in trying to capture time.
This was a quick read, taking me under an hour to finish. Yet, it resisted being easily grasped: Starting with the story of Captain Mission, a pirate settled in Madagascar and obsessed with preserving the native lemurs, moving then to the hipocrisy of Jesus Christ as Savior, and ending with plagues scarier (and more surreal) than ebola, the book packs into a small bottle a big punch. So big, in fact, that I wasn't able to describe my reaction to it clearly enough to write this review. (I hope I didn't babble too much here!)
Burroughs shows a wicked sense of humor, specially in the Notes at the end. And with imagery as wild and scary as a bad trip, this is a good introduction to one of the most discussed authors of the last half of our century.
I read this through a couple of shifts at work at the book store. This particularly slim volume is as radiant as it is intoxicating. Burroughs blends his comedic theatrics with researched biology, drug use, and Central/South American culture to form a story that's actually a direct statement on humanity's relentless meddling with nature. The use of the lemur is particularly powerful, where Burroughs consistently drives the point home by describing how friendly, intelligent, and pet-like the lemurs can be, yet how we humans, who kill for pleasure, will never have a positive relationship with the lemurs.

In addition, there are some horrific descriptions of disease, and the analogy that humans take on to viruses is quite awesome in its success.

The problems with this book lie in that it almost feels incomplete-it is far too schizophrenic for any coherent plot to be formed (there are three major sections and an afterward, and each has its own plot-sometimes characters pass between one section, sometimes they are confined), and at times it almost seems far too pretentious. Being one of Burroughs's later books, I wonder if he took his prolific status and abused it to put forward something that didn't meet previous work's standards.

Despite its failings, this book is short enough to read and not consider a waste of time, and the facts on South America and animal extinction are so eccentric and hard to find in other literature that the book will seem more worth your time than it actually may be.