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The Nine Old Men (American Constitutional and Legal History) download ebook

by Drew Pearson

The Nine Old Men (American Constitutional and Legal History) download ebook
ISBN:
0306706091
ISBN13:
978-0306706097
Author:
Drew Pearson
Publisher:
Da Capo Press (March 21, 1974)
Language:
Pages:
57 pages
ePUB:
1876 kb
Fb2:
1130 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Rules & Procedures
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

The Nine Old Men. Drew M. Pearson wrote a daily column on political events until the 1970s. Robert S. Allen was the co-author of this popular history of the Supreme Court. This 1936 book has 17 chapters in its 325 pages, a ‘Contents’, but no ‘Index’ or photographs.

The Nine Old Men. The current marble Supreme Court building was completed in 1935, its first permanent residence.

The "old patriots," later called "Anti-Federalists," advocated the New .

The "old patriots," later called "Anti-Federalists," advocated the New Jersey Plan, a purely federal proposal, based on providing each state with equal representation. The Connecticut Compromise allowed for both plans to work together. Other controversies developed regarding slavery and a Bill of Rights in the original document Revenues were requisitioned by Congressional petition to each state. The Constitutional Convention voted to keep the debates secret so that the delegates could speak freely, negotiate, bargain, compromise and change.

First Americans provides a comprehensive history of Native Americans from their earliest appearance. the American Enlightenment, the rise of liberalism and A History of Western Political Thought. A History of the American People. 51 MB·3,010 Downloads. Printed in the United States of America. I. United States-History. and attending scores. 94 MB·698 Downloads·New!

Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The Thirteenth Amendment (Amendment XIII) to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime. In Congress, it was passed by the Senate on April 8, 1864, and by the House on January 31, 1865. The amendment was ratified by the required number of states on December 6, 1865. On December 18, 1865, Secretary of State William H. Seward proclaimed its adoption

Nine Old Men (American Constitutional and Legal History). Drew Pearson was one of the best-known American columnists of his day, noted for his syndicated newspaper column Washington Merry-Go-Round, in which he attacked various public persons

Nine Old Men (American Constitutional and Legal History). 0306706091 (ISBN13: 9780306706097). Drew Pearson was one of the best-known American columnists of his day, noted for his syndicated newspaper column Washington Merry-Go-Round, in which he attacked various public persons. Books by Drew Pearson.

Readers may start with the first chapter, on the National Mall in Washington, DC, a central place where these themes come together. We were often taught American history as going from East to West and the British settlement as being the preeminent story. Ted Morgan’s book emphasises the fact there were multiple settlements and multiple beginnings of American history.

Documents of American history. Contains documents relating to American history from 1492 to 1962. Contains primary source material.

The Constitution of the United States established America’s national government and fundamental laws, and guaranteed . The Preamble to the Constitution outlines the document's purpose and guiding principles

The Constitution of the United States established America’s national government and fundamental laws, and guaranteed certain basic rights for its citizens. The Preamble to the Constitution outlines the document's purpose and guiding principles.

Nine Old Men (American Constitutional and Legal History) with Robert Allen, (1974) ISBN 0-306-70609-1 The Nine Old Men, Drew Pearson and Robert S. Allen, Doubleday, Doran & Company, In. 1937, digitized by the Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from. dmenatcros00pear djvu.

Reviews:
  • Kerdana
For serious students and followers of Supreme Court history, the New Deal era contemporary "The Nine Old Men" is a classic read. It is a self-proclaimed "muckraking" account of the Court written just prior to the "switch in time that saved nine" -- which in itself provides a unique window on a milestone in Court history. For those of us who revel in always learning more about the Court and its impact on society, this is a fun view into a moment in time.
  • Zadora
Great read.
  • Kajishakar
The Nine Old Men

Drew M. Pearson wrote a daily column on political events until the 1970s. Robert S. Allen was the co-author of this popular history of the Supreme Court. This 1936 book has 17 chapters in its 325 pages, a ‘Contents’, but no ‘Index’ or photographs. The current marble Supreme Court building was completed in 1935, its first permanent residence. In the past they met in the basement of the Senate building. Its site had previously been a tavern that was used as the Capitol Prison during the Civil War (Chapter I). Criticism of the Supreme Court goes back to Jefferson and Lincoln. Teddy Roosevelt advocated the recall of judicial decisions (Chapter II). Supreme Court Justices have a tradition of failing to retire at age seventy with their pensions (p.33). New Deal legislation created dissent and rancor (p.42). Chapter III lists the most important conflicts between the Court and the executive-legislative branches of the government.

The Constitutional Convention rejected the idea that the Supreme Court could declare acts of Congress unconstitutional (p.48). It allowed the President to veto legislature and Congress to override a veto. The Supreme Court misinterpreted the XIV Amendment to negate it (p.65). In 1876 new Justices changed the character of the Court to defenders of corporations against the people. They became legislators not jurists. Chapter IV discusses the amazing career of Charles Evans Hughes, whose varied career seems unique among Justices and politicians. The career of Harlan Fiske Stone is noted in Chapter V, who also had a varied career. Chapter VI describes Pierce Butler. [History has justified his dissent on the Virginia sterilization law (p.117).] Like others, he was a lawyer for Big Corporations. The value of Court decisions on a rate of return is explained (p.123). Butler lives simply with his wife and eight children (p.133). But he had a record of intolerance and bias (pp.135, 138).

Chapter VII discusses the career of Owen J. Roberts, “the Philadelphia Lawyer” for big corporations. He too has oscillated between a liberal record then a conservative advocate. Chapter VIII describes the career of Louis D. Brandeis, a crusader for human rights and economic democracy, and against the concentration of power. Willis Van Devanter had the longest service but wrote few opinions (Chapter IX). He upheld the Eighteenth Amendment and ruled that prosecution in federal court and a state court did not violate double jeopardy. The Union Pacific railroad fraudulently appropriated much of Wyoming lands and then sold them, Van Devanter argues their case. Van Devanter accepted money from the AAA until it was ruled unconstitutional. Chapter X discusses George Sutherland, an amiable conservative who backs reactionary policies. He is for “property rights” (big corporations) and against “personal rights” (those who work for or buy from big corporations).

Benjamin Cardozo is the subject of Chapter XI. His sympathies favor women, like a deserted wife. Cardozo never practiced commercial law but argued difficult points of law for lawyers. He is a tremendous worker in writing opinions and decisions. James McReynolds is described as stupid or lazy (Chapter XII). He is not friendly or civil to associates. [His actions and personality suggest a problem.] Chapter XIII discusses Homer Cummings, the Attorney-General and the personnel of the Justice Department. It tells about the regulation of oil produced in East Texas. The omission of a key paragraph in a law affected a decision. The forming of the National Recovery Act is discussed in Chapter XIV. Did it give one man too much power over the economy? A minimum wage and maximum hours would bring the same results. This chapter has a summary of the Schechter brother’s case. They won their suit but went bankrupt in a year.

Chapter XV continues the legal history of the AAA. It was rejected on the basis of the Tenth Amendment. Was the Court looking for any reason to strike down the AAA? The dissent noted that compliance was voluntary. The public criticized this decision. The Court ruled differently in approving the Tennessee Valley Authority’s plan to sell electric power. They struck down the Guffey Coal Act which sought to stabilize soft coal production cuts, strikes, and bloodshed (Chapter XVI). This was a reversal of an earlier decision which said coal production was an interstate industry. The policy of the mine owners ruined their industry. Supreme Court decisions helped capital and destroyed labor. Chapter XVII discusses social legislation and the approval in 1917 of minimum wage laws, and its nullification in 1932 (different Justices). The Supreme Court is political, the Justices are former politicians (pp.322-323). The US Constitution is written but the Justices define it.

The Supreme Court can be reformed by these actions: mandatory retirement when a judge turns age 70; a term of twelve years (but may be reappointed); expanding the number of Justices to thirteen or fifteen. The first should prevent senility, the second to allow more responsibility to the electorate. The third would allow more work to be done or cases to be heard. The Court now rejects appeals that aren’t made within one year of conviction, even if new evidence was later discovered that proves actual innocence!