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Displaced Persons: Growing Up American After the Holocaust download ebook

by Joseph Berger

Displaced Persons: Growing Up American After the Holocaust download ebook
ISBN:
068485757X
ISBN13:
978-0684857572
Author:
Joseph Berger
Publisher:
Scribner (April 24, 2001)
Language:
Pages:
352 pages
ePUB:
1552 kb
Fb2:
1378 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf lrf rtf
Category:
World
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

Displaced Persons book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Displaced Persons: Growing Up American After the Holocaust as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Displaced Persons book. Start by marking Displaced Persons: Growing Up American After the Holocaust as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Displaced Persons: Growing Up American After the .

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Displaced Persons: Growing Up American After the Holocaust" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. The author of The Young Scientists, Berger lives in Larchmont, New York, with his wife and daughter.

Displaced Persons: Growing Up American After the Holocaust. Berger joined the staff of The New York Times in 1984. He served as chief religion correspondent from 1985 to 1987, and as national and local education correspondent from 1987 to 1993

Displaced Persons: Growing Up American After the Holocaust. He served as chief religion correspondent from 1985 to 1987, and as national and local education correspondent from 1987 to 1993. Berger wrote a column on education from 2006 to.

Berger, Joseph, 1945-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Growing Up American After the Holocaust. 347 pp. New York: Scribner. As a 5-year-old he was among the 140,000 Jewish refugees who arrived in the United States between 1946 and 1953; they were a different breed of refugee, only later known as Holocaust survivors. Berger's book is an extraordinary memoir, full of pride, tenderness and love.

Displaced Persons" will stand as an important contribution, not only to our understanding of the long-term implications of being a survivor of the . I really enjoyed Joseph Berger's description of his family's Holocaust expereince.

Displaced Persons" will stand as an important contribution, not only to our understanding of the long-term implications of being a survivor of the Holocaust, but of the unique burdens, pressures and responsibilities children of survivors inherit from their parents. The book appealed to me on two levels: Several family friends had been survivors but I had never known from the inside what their lives were like in America. People did not talk about their experiences.

He is the author of three books: Displaced Persons: Growing Up American After the Holocaust, which was a New York Times Notable Book; The World in a City: Traveling the Globe Through the Neighborhoods of the New New York; and The Young Scientists: America's Future and the Winning of the Westinghouse. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever.

"Although I may not have been able to articulate it, I already felt these alien streets would be a trial, filled with unfamiliar faces and unfamiliar tongues. How could I make a friend when I didn't even speak English? How could I understand a teacher or classmate? And how could I rely on my perplexed, frightened parents to help me cope?"So begins New York Times reporter Joseph Berger's beguiling account of how one family of Polish Jews - with one son born at the close of World War II and the other one in a "displaced persons" camp outside Berlin - managed to make a life for themselves in an utterly foreign landscape. Displaced Persons speaks directly to a little-known slice of Holocaust history, illuminating as never before the experience of 140,000 refugees who came to the United States between 1947 and 1953.The world of Manhattan's Upper West Side, in the shadow of Hitler's atrocities, has been the subject of some of Isaac Bashevis Singer's best fiction. But through the eyes of a bright and perceptive boy we come to understand the reality on a more visceral level. Like many immigrants and children of immigrants, Jospeh Berger lives in two worlds at the same time. On the one hand, there is this thrillingly rich American turf to explore as a child, and he does a brilliant job of bringing that adventure to life. On the other hand, he never lets us forget what it's like to feel intractably rooted in another, incompatible world of refugee parents who cannot speak English, a world of people dazed from unimaginable loss, and whose loneliness is unrelenting.
Reviews:
  • Arakus
Displaced Persons is the story of growing up in the United States, both Joseph's parents are survivors of the Holocaust. Joseph, his little brother, and parents came to the United States in March 1950. They had one relative in the area, unbeknowst to them he had died. Eventually both parents found jobs, Joseph's father working in a factory, his mother making hats. Both the boys were enrolled in school, thus began life as immigrants in another country. I thought this was a wonderful book, it really described so many of the feelings of an immigrant. Shame, about not fitting in, shame in how Joseph looked at his parents. I was pleased that the book included some history about Joseph's mother growing up in Poland before the war. There was very little information about his father's past, I think his father just couldn't articulate something with so much pain. His father, also from Poland, lost both parents, and six sisters. Joseph had one uncle left on his mother's side of the family. There was also a lot of happiness in this book, the over all feeling was very positive which is why I gave it five stars.
  • AGAD
This is a poignant success story of an immigrant family who came to a foreign country, America, and built a future for themselves and their children. It is an important story for this generation to read and understand.
  • Pringles
This book resonated profoundly due to a shared history. I found myself responding very emotionally to the story and my evoked memories, which somewhat surprised me as I thought I had dealt with the pain thoroughly. I think there are some experiences that never lose their emotional force, no matter how much we have processed them and think we have defanged them.
  • INvait
Excellent book. Such a moving account of what it was like to grow up as Holocaust survivors. So open and honest. I also am a child of Holocaust survivors, but my parents never liked talking much about it as it was too painful, and I wouldn't ask too many questions so I could spare them the pain. My mother had a number on her arm from Auschwitz, but was "lucky" to be sent off to a "work" camp instead of to the ovens. My parents lived for their children, just as Joseph Berger's parents did, and I was lucky to be born in the USA. My sister and brother came here as children and were "greeners" like Joseph. The book made me laugh and cry! Thank you Joseph Berger for illuminating such an evil era which I could never understand completely and never really will.
  • Nikobar
So much of this book clarified many of my feelings, both known and hidden, as a child of survivors. Thank you Mr. Berger.
  • Arashigore
This book was a recommended book by my religion class,. I enjoyed the way the book was written. The characters and their stories evolved and blossomed nicely. I recommend this book
  • Modar
A wonderful memoir that sheds light on how the Holocaust affected the next generation of Jews who grew up in New York. Wonderfully descriptive language as Berger shares with us his adventures growing up in New York. A colorful boyhood,despite his initial embarrassment that his parents were not educated and worked on Saturday. His parents' story of how people reconstruct their lives after losing everything and everyone in the Holocaust is poignant.
Berger's memories of his childhood are amazingly crisp and there can never be too many accounts of the tales of survivors; as a second generation person from New York, I recognize his parents very well.