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Islamophobia: The Challenge of Pluralism in the 21st Century download ebook

by Ibrahim Kalin,John L. Esposito

Islamophobia: The Challenge of Pluralism in the 21st Century download ebook
ISBN:
0199753644
ISBN13:
978-0199753642
Author:
Ibrahim Kalin,John L. Esposito
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 30, 2011)
Language:
Pages:
280 pages
ePUB:
1602 kb
Fb2:
1514 kb
Other formats:
rtf docx txt azw
Category:
World
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

This book provides a panoramic look on the axes that mobilized and still sustain Islamophobia

- Times Literary Supplement. This book provides a panoramic look on the axes that mobilized and still sustain Islamophobia. It covers major relevant issues (religious, political, social, and cultural (popular novel, media, film, et. where the seeds of hatred or misunderstanding of Islam are sown.

A prolific writer, Professor Esposito is the author of over 25 books, including What Everyone Needs to Know About Islam, The Islamic Threat: Myth or Reality?, and Unholy War: Terror in the Name of Islam. Books by John L. Esposito

John L. Esposito is University Professor, Professor of Religion and International Affairs and of Islamic Studies at Georgetown University

John L. Esposito is University Professor, Professor of Religion and International Affairs and of Islamic Studies at Georgetown University.

By John L. Esposito, Ibrahim Kalin. Islamophobia and the Challenges of Pluralism in the 21st Century is a timely topic in a world in which the relationship between Islam and the West matters more than ever before. The increasing interdependence and coexistence among dissimilar peoples makes mutual acceptance and respect requisites for social harmony in our interconnected world; thus, the need for the Muslim and the Western worlds to accommodate each other is especially important given the central role these two large communities have been playing in global relations for the last fourteen centuries.

in the late twentieth century with the digital revolution. Tanzanian neoliberalism. has created exploding economic inequality and urbanization that continue to be. racialized in the minds of the perceived dispossessed. This study contributes to. revaluating our understanding of racialism, postcolonial African nationalism

Skip to the audio challenge.

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Islamophobia has been on the rise since September 11, as seen in countless cases of discrimination, racism, hate speeches, physical attacks, and anti-Muslim campaigns. The 2006 Danish cartoon crisis and the controversy surrounding Pope Benedict XVI's Regensburg speech have underscored the urgency of such issues as image-making, multiculturalism, freedom of expression, respect for religious symbols, and interfaith relations.

John L. Oxford University Press, 30 Mar 2011 - 280 sayfa. Islamophobia has been on the rise since September 11, as seen in countless cases of discrimination, racism, hate speeches, physical attacks, and anti-Muslim campaigns.

A Look at the Continuum of Impression Formation on Two Cases of Violent Extremism in the Media. The Allen Institute for AIProudly built by AI2 with the help of our.

From the publisher: Islamophobia has been on the rise since September 11, as seen in countless cases of discrimination, racism, hate speeches, physical attacks, and anti-Muslim campaigns. The 2006 Danish cartoon crisis and the controversy surrounding Pope Benedict XVI’s Regensburg speech have underscored the urgency of such issues as image-making, multiculturalism, freedom of expression, respect for religious symbols, and interfaith relations.

Islamophobia has been on the rise since September 11, as seen in countless cases of discrimination, racism, hate speeches, physical attacks, and anti-Muslim campaigns. The 2006 Danish cartoon crisis and the controversy surrounding Pope Benedict XVI's Regensburg speech have underscored the urgency of such issues as image-making, multiculturalism, freedom of expression, respect for religious symbols, and interfaith relations. The 1997 Runnymede Report defines Islamophobia as "dread, hatred, and hostility towards Islam and Muslims perpetuated by a series of closed views that imply and attribute negative and derogatory stereotypes and beliefs to Muslims." Violating the basic principles of human rights civil liberties, and religious freedom, Islamophobic acts take many different forms. In some cases, mosques, Islamic centers, and Muslim properties are attacked and desecrated. In the workplace, schools, and housing, it takes the form of suspicion, staring, hazing, mockery, rejection, stigmatizing and outright discrimination. In public places, it occurs as indirect discrimination, hate speech, and denial of access to goods and services. This collection of essays takes a multidisciplinary approach to Islamophobia, bringing together the expertise and experience of Muslim, American, and European scholars. Analysis is combined with policy recommendations. Contributors discuss and evaluate good practices already in place and offer new methods for dealing with discrimination, hatred, and racism.
Reviews:
  • Bremar
This book provides a panoramic look on the axes that mobilized and still sustain Islamophobia. It covers major relevant issues (religious, political, social, and cultural (popular novel, media, film, etc.) where the seeds of hatred or misunderstanding of Islam are sown. The multidisciplinary, objective, and well-documented chapters will help researchers and students alike to branch out into further research on Islamophobia.

I find the reference, at times, to Muslims as a collective body frustrating, as in this statement in the forward: "...Islam has been a central factor in the lives of its adherents. Its system of faith has guided them not only in spiritual and moral matters but also in their total world outlook" (vi). I wonder where Muslim university professors, like me, who studied in the west and have internalized some aspects of the western world-view stand? The tone of speaking about Islam as a totalizing hegemonic system may not help much in advancing the case against an islamophobia that lumps all Muslims together. However, this is a commendable effort and a welcome voice at a time when the trumpets of fury are sounded against Islam and Muslims.
  • Shem
This book deals with an important subject and is on target responding adequately to the prevalent Islamophobia. Its editor John Esposito is a well-known authority on Islam.
  • Kitaxe
I find the very term "Islamophobia" to be absolutely disingenuous and duplicitous. Therefore, I find the very premise of the book false and have no intention of reading such tripe. In the description of this book a reference to a report is made, which attempted to define "Islamophobia". It was very easy to turn it on its head. Here I have made some changes to make it into something a bit more honest.

"The 1997 Runnymede Report defines infidelophobia as "dread, hatred, and hostility towards non-Muslims perpetuated by a series of closed views, indoctrinated by the tenets of Islam, that imply and attribute negative and derogatory stereotypes and beliefs to non-Muslims." Violating the basic principles of human rights, civil liberties, and religious freedom, infidelophobic acts take many different forms. In some cases, churches, temples, monasteries, night clubs, train stations, subway stations, and non-Muslim properties are attacked and desecrated. In the workplace, schools, and housing, it takes the form of suspicion, staring, hazing, mockery, rejection, stigmatizing, and outright murder. In public places, it occurs as direct and indirect discrimination, hate speech, and denial of access to goods and services."

What I see going on in Muslim majority lands against non-Muslims goes well beyond anything Muslims have had to "endure" here in the West. It is due to this kind of behavior, the institutional/political discrimination of the non-Muslim, and the very hostile tenets of Islamic doctrine, that make Islam perceived as a threat by many non-Muslims. Islam has itself to blame, not us. Don't expect tolerance when none is given. I don't see Muslims speaking out against the injustices being done to non-Muslims on a daily basis in places like Egypt, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Nigeria, Sudan, etc...All I see are Muslims whining about not getting Halal food, their right to wear the burka, have prayer rooms, gender separation, etc... Don't forget that Esposito is tied to Saudi money and patronage. He is an insincere apologist for a theology of intolerance for the non-Muslim.