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Holy War and Human Bondage: Tales of Christian-Muslim Slavery in the Early-Modern Mediterranean (Praeger Series on the Early Modern World) download ebook

by Robert C. Davis

Holy War and Human Bondage: Tales of Christian-Muslim Slavery in the Early-Modern Mediterranean (Praeger Series on the Early Modern World) download ebook
ISBN:
027598950X
ISBN13:
978-0275989507
Author:
Robert C. Davis
Publisher:
Praeger; 1 edition (July 1, 2009)
Language:
Pages:
316 pages
ePUB:
1553 kb
Fb2:
1574 kb
Other formats:
txt lit lrf rtf
Category:
World
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

Praeger Series on the Early Modern World.

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2009 October 2019 · Journal of Early Modern History.

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Praeger series on the early modern world. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. by Joseph Rosse, Robert Levin. 95 Author: Rosse, Joseph G. Publication & Distribution: San Francisco.

Holy War and Human Bondage: Tales of Christian-Muslim Slavery in the Early-Modern Mediterranean tells a story unfamiliar to most modern readers―how this pervasive servitude involved, connected, and divided those on both sides of the Mediterranean. The work explores how men and women, Christians and Muslims, Jews and sub-Saharan Africans experienced their capture and bondage, while comparing what they went through with what black Africans endured in the Americas.

Drawing heavily on archival sources not previously available in English, Holy War and Human Bondage teems with personal and highly felt stories of Muslims and Christians who personally fell into captivity and slavery, or who struggled to free relatives and co-religionists in bondage.

In these pages, readers will discover how much race slavery and faith slavery once resembled one other and how much they overlapped in the Early-Modern mind. Each produced its share of personal suffering and social devastation―yet the whims of history have made the one virtually synonymous with human bondage while confining the other to almost complete oblivion.

Reviews:
  • Tehn
Excellent product.
  • Stoneshaper
I recommend this book because it presents information that most Americans, even those who are students of history, know nothing about: namely that from 1500-1700 when white Europeans began bringing Africans to the New World as slaves, white Christians and Muslims were also being enslaved in the countries around the Mediterranean. This is a work of scholarship, derived from primary research in slave narratives, ship manifests, and reports of diplomatic personnel and members of religious orders. The reader will get a good idea of how slave traders operated, what the lives of the slaves were like, and some estimate of the number of people involved.

Although the author is a professor of history at Ohio State University he makes a few puzzling errors. He refers to the "Christianization" of Spain by Ferdinand and Isabella and their successors. This is somewhat misleading because the Iberian peninsula had been Christian for centuries before the Muslims arrived and continued to have a large Christian population during the period of Muslim domination. In another misleading statement he has the Spanish driving the Moors from their ancient homeland. The Moors ancient homeland was North Africa from which the Arabs invaded Spain in the 8th century and the Berbers invaded again in the 11th.(Maybe he meant the Spanish drove the Moors from their (the Spanish) ancient homeland. He also says the Black Africans' only crime was their race. No, their only crime was their weakness; they were enslaved because they did not have a state strong enough to protect them and willing to do so. He concluded the book by leaving the impression that slavery died out in the Mediterranean world in the course of the 19th century. Perhaps this is true of European slavery but Black slavery continued into the late 20th. Slavery was abolished in Saudi Arabia in 1963 and it was still practiced in parts of North Africa in the 1970s and in the Sudan in the 1990s.

The author is to be commended for exploring a subject about which so little has been written. It is a sad commentary on the state of the historical profession that he must devote several pages at the beginning of this book justifying his treatment of the subject of white slavery. Evidently historians have decided that only the enslavement of Blacks Africans by White Europeans counts as "real" slavery and nothing else in world history can match it for brutality and cruelty. Davis shows that Christian and Muslim slaves were also cruelly treated and that any type of slavery, by its nature, deprives individuals of their basic human dignity. Not even Mr. Davis emphasizes clearly enough that slavery has been the norm in human history. What is exceptional is the idea that it is not just a personal misfortune but a deep moral wrong for one person to own another. The notion that slavery is morally unacceptable grew out of the ideas of the 18th century European enlightenment and 19th century evangelical Christianity and gradually spread to the rest of the world.