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This Tree Grows Out of Hell: Mesoamerica & the Search for the Magical Body (Living Planet Book) download ebook

by Ptolemy Tompkins

This Tree Grows Out of Hell: Mesoamerica & the Search for the Magical Body (Living Planet Book) download ebook
ISBN:
1402748825
ISBN13:
978-1402748820
Author:
Ptolemy Tompkins
Publisher:
Sterling; Revised edition (March 4, 2008)
Language:
Pages:
240 pages
ePUB:
1716 kb
Fb2:
1960 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr docx mobi
Category:
World
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

Ptolemy Tompkins’s spellbinding plunge into the history and meaning of Mesoamerican civilizations-first published a decade ago-is more compelling now than ever

Ptolemy Tompkins’s spellbinding plunge into the history and meaning of Mesoamerican civilizations-first published a decade ago-is more compelling now than ever. Combining scholarly knowledge with visionary perception and sensitivity.

This book sets out to find recognizable spiritual motivations for violent practices that could easily be written off as just . It isn't often that you read a book that so deftly communicates the cosmic framework of an ancient culture

This book sets out to find recognizable spiritual motivations for violent practices that could easily be written off as just insane. It isn't often that you read a book that so deftly communicates the cosmic framework of an ancient culture. However, it is obvious that Tompkins' take on the archeological evidence of ritual and religion left by the Olmecs, Aztecs and Mayans is written within the framework of modern culture.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Ptolemy Tompkins.

Examines the Mayan, Aztec, and other related cultures from the perspective of each region's shifting understanding of the human soul. The author shows that despite their amazing achievements, these civilisations eventually crumbled because they lost touch with their sense of community, their true natures and their environments. Make no mistake, this is an excellent book.

April 29, 2011 History. Published March 4, 2008 by Sterling. This Tree Grows Out of Hell Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove This Tree Grows Out of Hell from your list? This Tree Grows Out of Hell.

Ptolemy Tompkins’s spellbinding plunge into the history and meaning of Mesoamerican civilizations-first published a decade ago-is more compelling now than ever. Combining scholarly knowledge with visionary perception and sensitivity, he examines the Mayan, Aztec, and other related cultures from the perspective of that region’s shifting understanding of the human soul

Ptolemy Tompkins is an American author and illustrator. He has written and illustrated a variety of nonfiction works about the natural world of plants and animals. The author dismisses New Age ideas about the origin and nature of these societies.

Showing books 91 to 100 of 24. Harpercollins (01 December 1990).

Showing books 91 to 100 of 246. Teotihuacan: The History of Ancient Mesoamerica's Largest City. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (22 April 2014).

Dreaming With Open Eyes: The Shamanic Spirit in Twentieth Century Art and. Все результаты Поиска книг Google Об авторе (1998). The Shaman's Doorway Opening Imagination to Power and Myth.

His first book, Paradise Fever: Growing Up in the Shadow of the New Age .

His first book, Paradise Fever: Growing Up in the Shadow of the New Age, was a chronicle of his life and times as a child of the human potential movement. to Discover Whether the Souls of Animals Live On.

Ptolemy Tompkins’s spellbinding plunge into the history and meaning of Mesoamerican civilizations—first published a decade ago—is more compelling now than ever. Combining scholarly knowledge with visionary perception and sensitivity, he examines the Mayan, Aztec, and other related cultures from the perspective of that region’s shifting understanding of the human soul. A profoundly spiritual and ecological thread runs through this enlightening work like a river: despite their amazing achievements, these civilizations eventually crumbled because they lost touch with their sense of community, their true natures, and their environments. Above all, Tompkins vividly reveals how violence became a deeply flawed but powerful strategy for accessing the ever-retreating realm of the spirit, which had once guided and directed human life.
Reviews:
  • Early Waffle
There could hardly be a culture more obsessed with violence and death than the Aztecs. This book sets out to find recognizable spiritual motivations for violent practices that could easily be written off as just insane. Foremost is the suggestion that the Aztecs, like most ancient peoples, longed for a lost spiritual 'golden age', which for them might have entailed direct experience of intense shamanic trance states. Perhaps they experienced something similar to the phenomenon of ‘shamanic dismemberment’ that Mircea Eliade documented in various other cultures, but after losing access to this experience the Aztecs began to re-enact it in physical form as human sacrifice. Another suggestion is that the Aztec empire sought a state of perpetual warfare as a way to maintain each warrior’s awareness of imminent death in order to give life the otherworldly intensity that they all craved. One or two pop-culture references are made, so I'll make one of my own: the Aztecs are portrayed here as a sort of ‘Fight Club’ culture writ large, intentionally crashing their civilization and proclaiming, “We just had a near-life experience!”
  • Marilace
It isn't often that you read a book that so deftly communicates the cosmic framework of an ancient culture. However, it is obvious that Tompkins' take on the archeological evidence of ritual and religion left by the Olmecs, Aztecs and Mayans is written within the framework of modern culture. Of course, any academic will translate an ancienct culture of which he has no first hand knowledge via his own ideologies, so it is silly to critique it, as the other reviewer has, in such a way. This book is a refreshing look at religion and spirituality in mesoameria, and is a good resource for anyone seeking knowledge about shamanism as well.
  • Ral
A great book. Honestly conveys the horrors of Aztec society--their compulsion to suffer. Why do human beings create such societies, so destructive and self-destructive. Western people have their own Sacrificial Rituals, however we barely recognize them as sacrificial rituals. A good example is the First World War. See my analysis of how nations sacrifice their own people in NATIONS HAVE THE RIGHT TO KILL: https://www.amazon.com/Nations-Have-Right-Kill-Holocaust/dp/0915042231
  • Hap
I'm astonished by the political correctness of the main editorial review at the top of this page. It suggests that the book was written to be a mirror on the modern day, that we have much to learn from ancient mesoamerican culture.

Make no mistake, this is an excellent book. But what it really shows us is the depths of horror and depravity that was pre-conquest mesoamerican culture. The Aztecs were monsters, but their only invention was in the refining of the horrors the Mayans, whom they conquered from within.

The author provides details of the depravity of the Aztecs. This is not a book for the squeamish.

One of the key points of this book is that all the client peoples of the Aztecs hated the Aztecs so much that the moment a new power (the Spanish) arrived, the subject people flocked to them because they simply could not imagine any other situation that could be worse than life under the Aztecs. And no, I'm not an apologist for the Spanish--neither am I willing to excuse the brutal, homicidal native culture that thankfully is gone now.
  • Qulcelat
This is a brilliant book. I've re-read it many times. A previous reviewer wrote that he did a net search on the author and discovered he was a "70's guru." Not so. His father was the weird one. His son, the author of this book, is a respected scholar.
  • Inabel
I am half way from completing this book and I can not read any further. I began to notice a nagging sense of moral superiority from the author that I found objectionable. The author constantly compares the Mayas and the Aztecs to other shamanistic cultures and each time points out how the shamanistic society was obviously superior. I thought it was odd early on when he routinely quoted from books that discussed Eskimo and Sioux shamans. I was confused as to what this had to do with Mesoamerican religion and culture. Granted they are all Native Americans, but this book claimed to concern itself only with Mesoamerica. He also spent much of the book expressing how the mistake of the Mesoamericans was in their building of cities, that this represented a Fall from the Eden of the shamanistic society. After becoming fed up with this tripe I did a search online for the author and I learned that according to one description he was "one of the most colorful gurus of the '70s' New Age movement". I finally fully comprehended why I hated this book so much.