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Hittite Fortifications c.1650-700 BC (Fortress) download ebook

by Konstantin S Nossov,Konstantin Nossov,Brian Delf

Hittite Fortifications c.1650-700 BC (Fortress) download ebook
ISBN:
1846032075
ISBN13:
978-1846032073
Author:
Konstantin S Nossov,Konstantin Nossov,Brian Delf
Publisher:
Osprey Publishing; First Edition edition (February 26, 2008)
Language:
Pages:
64 pages
ePUB:
1159 kb
Fb2:
1564 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit azw docx
Category:
Military
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

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Konstantin Nossov examines the fortifications constructed by the Hittites in their efforts to sustain and then halt the decline of their once flourishing empire

Konstantin Nossov examines the fortifications constructed by the Hittites in their efforts to sustain and then halt the decline of their once flourishing empire. Providing an in-depth anatomy of the fortresses, focusing on the major sites of the principal city Hattusha as well as sites at Alacah y k and Karatepe, with full-color reconstructions, this is an intriguing glimpse into the history of an empire which at its height rivalled the Egyptians and Assyrians.

Hittite Fortifications . 650-700 BC - Konstantin S Nossov. Hittite fortifications c. 1650–700 bc. Introduction. In the second half of the 3rd millennium BC the Indo-European tribes known to us as the Hittites started to migrate to and settle in Central Anatolia. 650-700 BC - Fortress (Paperback). Konstantin S. Nossov (author), Brian Delf (illustrator). Overall, another fine book in this series and one that should be on the shelves of anyone interested in this particular time and place in ancient history. -Scott Van Aken, modelingmadness. Although much has vanished over the millennia there's still a surprising amount to be seen by visitors to the area, and the major sites are comprehensively described and illustrated here. The Hittites clashed with other empires as well as with nearer neighbours, and developed some intriguing fortification techniques as a result.

Konstantin Nossov examines the fortifications constructed by the Hittites in their efforts to sustain and then halt the decline of their once flourishing empire. Providing an in-depth anatomy of the fortresses, focusing on the major sites of the principal city Hattusha as well as sites at Alacahöyàk and Karatepe with full-colour reconstructions, this is an intriguing glimpse into the history of an empire which at its height rivalled the Egyptians and Assyrians.

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In the second half of the third millennium BC the Indo-European tribe known as the Hittites migrated and settled in Central Anatolia, at that time a land of small city-states whose rulers lived in fortresses. These fortifications enabled the Hittites to transform themselves into a Bronze Age super-power defeating the Egyptians at Kadesh in c.1274 BC. Konstantin Nossov examines the fortifications constructed by the Hittites in their efforts to sustain and then halt the decline of their once flourishing empire. Providing an in-depth anatomy of the fortresses, focusing on the major sites of the principal city Hattusha as well as sites at Alacah_y_k and Karatepe, with full-color reconstructions, this is an intriguing glimpse into the history of an empire which at its height rivalled the Egyptians and Assyrians. It concludes with an examination of these sites as they survive today, information that will appeal to both enthusiasts and tourists visiting the area.
Reviews:
  • MilsoN
As with all Osprey books the main reason to buy them is the illustrations. These do not disappoint. This book contains detailed paintings of Hattusa, Alacahöyük, Karatepe, and Yazilikaya. It's pretty cool to see these ruins reconstructed and the artist does a fine job. The information in the book is good as well going into how the Hittites built their walls and why. It also goes into details on the main structure of the walls including the towers, ramps, ramparts, and tunnels. It then examines the fortifications of Hattusa, Alacahöyük, and Karatepe in detail. Throughout there are many photographs and diagrams. Very nice.
  • Blackbeard
Interesting illustrated elucidation of Late Bronze Age and Iron Age defensive structures of Hittites and Neo-Hittites.
  • Priotian
This book is packed with information, delivered in a no-nonsense manner. It has outstanding diagrams and graphics. Great for motivated amateurs or anyone seeking to get a detailed review of the latest findings.
  • Nalmergas
An excellent addition to an excellent series.
  • funike
This interesting people had a decisive influence on all Western culture - unfortunately its role is frequently under evaluated with most people having no idea on them. This little book will bring some light on them.

Good reading, indeed.
  • Beranyle
This is a truly superlative title from Konstantin Nossov. After a very short introduction of the main highlights of Hittite civilization, the author delves into a remarkable description of several sites. So far this probably seems like your average fortress title to you, isn’t it (and that would be very good actually, because the series has high standards)? But it's far better.

The author don’t just compares chronological events of several relevant contemporary civilizations in a table (although certain dates are aproximative and open to debate)…that would be good…but Nossov also explains the differences between the fortifications of said civilizations in very useful insets.

The author doesn’t just explain the sources for the reconstructions; he shows them with magnificent photos, line drawings, and map. He also explains with detail the generic construction and structure of the walls from the socle to the merlons; Nossov also describes as accurately possible the towers, the posterns, etc.

With impressive knowledge about the Hittites and ancient fortifications, the author explains the remains of important sites (including granaries or water supply systems), the defensive value of each characteristic (like the ramparts question if it’s only decorative or defensive in nature, the meaning and function of the sphinx gate at Hattusha upper city, were the posterns used as a defense system? , etc) and also an interpretation of the reliefs, their influences and possible meaning.

The book is heavily focused on Hattusha, but provides coverage of other fortresses like AlacaHöyük and Karatepe. It also delves into the architecture of fortified and unfortified sanctuaries.

Brian Delf brought those fortifications to life with magnificent plates; including: Construction of the wall of Hattusha; The King's and Lion Gates of the Upper City of Hattusha, 13th Cent BC; The Yerkapi rampart and the Sphinx Gate, 13th Cent BC; Büyükkale, Citadel of Hattusha, Late 13th Cent BC; Alacahöyük Fortress, 14th Cent BC; Karatepe Fortress, 8th Cent BC; The Rock Sanctuary of Yazilikaya, Second half of the 13th Cent BC.

Excellent line drawings and photographs of almost every structure or artifact referred in the text and a very complete bibliography completes this valuable title.
  • ℓo√ﻉ
As indicated in the title, and in agreement with other reviewers on Amazon.co.uk, this little book from Osprey's fortress series is a good one and a solid. It is not only about Hattusa, the capital city of the Hittite Empire during most of the Bronze Age. It also covers eight other sites, including two in some depth. It also shows how little we know about some of them, why, and how much is still to be discovered. For instance Carchemish's citadel is nowadays a Turkish military base, which is something that does not exactly help archaeological excavations).

This little book is a comprehensive introduction and this is what makes it so good. The author and the illustrator could have limited themselves to the description of the various sites and illustrated the reconstructions through a mix of plates, drawings and photos. This in itself would have made this booklet into a good Osprey title and all of this is indeed included. What makes this title "more than simply good" is that quite a lot of context is provided, both on the Hittite Bronze Age Empire and its successor states during the early Iron Age (up to 700 BC), and this is where the booklet moves from "good" to "outstanding" in my view.

Three other features complete the picture and while the first two are a bit mixed, but for very understandable reasons, the third (the bibliography) is rather good.

First, there is an interesting, even if perhaps imperfect, map of Anatolia, which, when compared with those that can be found in Trevor Bryce's books, might have minimized the maximum extension of the Hittite Empire (the western part of the Anatolia - Arzawa - is excluded from Hittite possessions although, depending upon the periods under consideration, it was at times independent, at times made up of several smaller states and at times these states were Hittite vassals or under Mycenian influence.

Second, there is a rather nice comparative chronology putting side by side the Hittites, the Egyptians, Mesopotamia, Troy and the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations. This is also a valuable - and somewhat brave, even if questionable - attempt to clarify and allow the "general reader" to compare and to contextualize even more. There is, of course, little room to discuss in such a volume the numerous chorological issues related to these comparisons, but the effort made by the author to present such a comparison should be praised, whatever its limits may be.

Third, there is a relatively short (as in all Osprey titles) but rather good bibliography with the main authors and Hittite "specialists" over the last 100 years being represented, and the author having quite clearly "done his homework" by going through them. Depending on how involved one wants to get, this book may suffice for a general overview of the Hittites. Alternatively, it could also be used as an introduction and starting point for anyone wanting to get more involved, with the next steps being books on their political and military history, their civilisations, and the various archaeological excavations. All three types of books are present in the bibliography.

This excellent starting point is worth five stars and highly recommended.
My 10 yr old who LOVES history really enjoyed this book. He says it was "fascinating."