cerkalo
» » Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass

Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass download ebook

by Theodore Dalrymple

Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass download ebook
ISBN:
1566635055
ISBN13:
978-1566635059
Author:
Theodore Dalrymple
Publisher:
Ivan R. Dee; Softcover Ed edition (March 8, 2003)
Language:
Pages:
284 pages
ePUB:
1903 kb
Fb2:
1531 kb
Other formats:
lit azw lrf txt
Category:
Europe
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass is a collection of essays written by British writer, doctor, and psychiatrist Theodore Dalrymple and published in book form by Ivan R. Dee in 2001.

Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass is a collection of essays written by British writer, doctor, and psychiatrist Theodore Dalrymple and published in book form by Ivan R. In 1994, the Manhattan Institute started publishing the contents of these essays in the City Journal magazine. They are about personal responsibility, the mentality of society as a whole, and the troubles of the underclass

Thomas Sowell ). It is a truism that ideas have consequences, but a truism is rarely illustrated as implacably as in this book. George F. Will ). Theodore Dalrymple is the best doctor-writer since William Carlos Williams. Life at the bottom is a page turning collection of essays that illustrate the bad fruit begotten by socialism, sentimentality, relativism and other modern manifestations of error. If a person wants to know what happens to societies that forget how to say mea culpa, amend their lives and do penance for their past sins look here.

In 1991, he made an extended appearance on British television under the name Theodore Dalrymple. Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass, a collection of essays was published in book form in 2001

In 1991, he made an extended appearance on British television under the name Theodore Dalrymple  . Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass, a collection of essays was published in book form in 2001. The essays, which the Manhattan Institute had first begun publishing in City Journal in 1994, deal with themes such as personal responsibility, the mentality of society as a whole, and the troubles of the underclass.

Theodore Dalrymple’s book shows both why that distinction is necessary, indeed absolutely essential, and why it has fallen from favor among those who decide society’s rules. But at the end, I will solve all the problems for you. Strap in. This book is a compilation of short articles written by Dalrymple for the London City Journal between 1994 and 2001

Страна: США. Безопасный режим: выкл.

The Game of Life and How to Play It - Audio Book - Продолжительность: 2:44:16 Free Audio Books Recommended for you. 2:44:16. Страна: США.

Life at the Bottom book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass. by. Theodore Dalrymple.

Электронная книга "Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass", Theodore Dalrymple

Электронная книга "Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass", Theodore Dalrymple. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Theodore Dalrymple, a British psychiatrist who treats the poor in a slum hospital and a prison in England, has .

Theodore Dalrymple, a British psychiatrist who treats the poor in a slum hospital and a prison in England, has seemingly seen it all. Yet in listening to and observing his patients, he is continually astonished by the latest twist of depravity that exceeds even his own considerable experience.

The Nature of the Non-Western World. New York: Mentor, 1957.

Life at the Bottom The Worldview That Makes the Underclass Dean, Vera Micheles. The Nature of the Non-Western World. New York: Basic Books, 2000. HD 2346 P4 S6713 Easterly, William. The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good. New York: Penguin Press, 2006

Theodore Dalrymple, a British psychiatrist wh. .

Theodore Dalrymple, a British psychiatrist wh.Theodore Dalrymple, a British psychiatrist who treats the poor in a slum hospital and a prison in England, has seemingly seen it all.

A searing account of life in the underclass and why it persists as it does, written by a British psychiatrist.
Reviews:
  • Peras
Great book and fast read. While it probably could be reduced by 25%, it doesn't seem repetitive really. The author strikes me as someone who isn't going after a segment with a popular view of society, but rather as someone who slowly changed his own views from his career. I think this is mostly accomplished because the author doesn't come across as mean or vindictive.

The best line of the book is when he counters the people who say they are "easily led". He points out that he's never heard of someone who was easily led to a better life. They're always "easily led" to drugs or ignorance.

Even if you enjoy it, the book is somewhat depressing and you'll ask yourself what the point his story is. But I think this is actually his goal - to show a realistic, unapologetic depressing look on some of the poor.
  • Xellerlu
As noted in other reviews, this book is a collection of essays that Dalrymple wrote during his years as a prison psychologist. The basic theme is that the progressive liberal views on crime, criminals, prison, etc., that we might think are confined to academic and intellectual circles have permeated the entire society and criminals are adversely affected by these ideas. Progressives talk about criminals being victims of society, and prisoners come to Dalrymple claiming to be exactly that. Liberal sociologists speak of prisons as if their sole purpose is to provide therapy and rehabilitation, with isolation from society, deterrence, etc., being ignored, and Dalrymple hears "Prison's no good to me, Doctor; prison's not what I need." (page 216) Sociologists of crime hold academic conferences about how criminal behavior is an addiction, a compulsion that cannot be resisted, and prisoners ask for therapy for their addiction. The cultural elite preach nihilism and despair, the system is rigged against you, it's all about who you know and not merit, etc., and then we are surprised at the pathetic sight of the elderly wasting their monthly pension income on slot machines and lottery tickets.

The subtitle of the book is "The Worldview That Makes the Underclass." The worldview we glimpse in these pages does not originate with the underclass, but it seeps into their minds from the cultural air they breathe, exhaled by the liberal elite who seem not to understand that ideas do indeed have consequences. I know of no other book that makes that insightful connection is such a powerful way. Hence, the recommendation on the cover from Thomas Sowell, "A classic for our times. It is as fundamental for understanding the world we live in as the three R's." (Sowell often cites stories from Dalrymple in his columns, concluding the citation with the point that the American reader probably thinks the story comes from a black urban environment, but the story actually comes from lower-class British white people. It is the worldview, not the skin color, that is decisive.)
  • Prince Persie
An excellent and eye opening look into the personal mentalities, choices and patterns of behavior that serve to perpetuate the misery of the underclass.

Unfortunately, the kinds of people who would be best served by reading this book (awareness and acknowledgement of a habitual/behavioral problem is, after all, the first step), will never read it.

The other group that would be well served to read this are the bleeding hearts who support overly liberal policies. This book provides some disturbingly thought provoking insights into the UK's uber 'Politically Correct' policies and the effects they've had on mentalities and education over there.

Many of the articles written by the author and compiled in this book were written in the 90's and early 2000's and yet, some folks are still pushing the US in that direction, despite contraindications from other countries who've already been there. A reader might be inclined to ask, "Why is that?"
  • Kerahuginn
Masterful style and wit combined with a genuine level of compassion and uncompromising evaluation of life's choices and their consequences. As a practicing physician in a small town emergency department I see the same problems and outcomes of our "post modern" culture. The study of "worldview" aka, philosophy and its current results might offer some direction. The greatest man to ever live said, "come to me all who are heavy laden (really tired) and I will give you rest". We have been brainwashed to ignore the importance of spiritual things and have swallowed the drugs of "enlightenment" which in the end only leave us desolate.
  • Vudozilkree
I find myself in agreement with many of the authors observations. As a child I saw bums in the street, I was touched by west side story and the injustices cast upon immigrants to the city. I saw the harsh injustices of racial discrimination and sympathized with the plight of poverty. I wanted to be a social worker, to play a part in righting the wrongs that society had wrought on the underprivileged. I became a social worker. I worked very long hours and very hard to do the very best I could but.... But I learned a lot over all the years of trying to do the right thing. First and foremost I know that the laws of segregation and injustice had to be confronted and changed as well as educational opportunity inequities but once those issues are addressed I did witness the debilitating effects that the social services had on their clients. As the author suggests, it is an industry that although created to help people can often have the effect of crippling them. There are no easy answers and the author offers no solutions save the implied solution to eliminate welfare and beef up the police force. Sometimes even I wonder if that might work.