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Shaping Medieval Landscapes (None) download ebook

by Tom Williamson

Shaping Medieval Landscapes (None) download ebook
ISBN:
0954557581
ISBN13:
978-0954557584
Author:
Tom Williamson
Publisher:
Windgather Press; 2 edition (December 1, 2004)
Language:
Pages:
214 pages
ePUB:
1114 kb
Fb2:
1154 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt lrf lrf
Category:
Europe
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

has been added to your Basket. Tom Williamson shows how subtle differences in soils and climate shaped not only the diverse landscapes of medieval England, but also the very structure of the societies, which occupied them. See all Product description.

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Throughout this book Tom Williamson The English landscape of today owes much to changes and transformations that took place in the medieval period, . before the large-scale planned enclosures from the 1700s onwards. What went before was a much more open system of fields with regional variations in the configuration of settlement, fields, hedgerows, roads and paths.

Dr Tom Williamson theorised in 2004 that the best explanation is the combination of soil quality and climate .

Dr Tom Williamson theorised in 2004 that the best explanation is the combination of soil quality and climate which leads to differences in agricultural techniques for exploiting local conditions.

In this radical and important book Tom Williamson overhauls many of the ideas about how they came about. Some scholars have argued that geographical differences in customs and culture, in the strength of lordship, and in population pressure were involved. Williamson in contrast argues that the overriding determinant was the practicality of working the land. Using a wealth of evidence from the Thames to the Wash, he shows how subtle differences in soils and climate shaped not only the layout of fields and farms, but the very structure of the societies that farmed them.

The English landscape of today owes much to changes and transformations that took place in the medieval period, .

In this radical and important book, Tom Williamson shows how subtle differences in soils and climate shaped not only the diverse landscapes of medieval England, but the very structure of the societies that occupied them

In this radical and important book, Tom Williamson shows how subtle differences in soils and climate shaped not only the diverse landscapes of medieval England, but the very structure of the societies that occupied them.

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Tom Williamson is Professor of Landscape History, University of East Anglia; he has written widely on landscape archaeology, agricultural history . Place of Publication. England Medieval Books. This item doesn't belong on this page.

Tom Williamson is Professor of Landscape History, University of East Anglia; he has written widely on landscape archaeology, agricultural history, and the history of landscape design. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

To explain the rich, complex patterns in the English landscape today, we have to understand how the land was farmed in the medieval period. Some regions had large villages with extensive open fields; others had scattered hamlets and less communal forms of agriculture. These differences are still with us - in the shape of fields, the form of settlement, and the character of hedges and woods. Archaeologists, historians and geographers have long argued about when, why and how these variations developed. In this radical and important book Tom Williamson overhauls many of the ideas about how they came about. Some scholars have argued that geographical differences in customs and culture, in the strength of lordship, and in population pressure were involved. Williamson in contrast argues that the overriding determinant was the practicality of working the land. Using a wealth of evidence from the Thames to the Wash, he shows how subtle differences in soils and climate shaped not only the layout of fields and farms, but the very structure of the societies that farmed them. This is a book which puts the environment back where it belongs - at the centre of the historical stage. It will be essential reading for all those interested in the history of the English landscape, social and economic history, and the way life was lived in the medieval countryside. 2nd edition with new cover and corrections.