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In the Name of the Working Class: The Inside Story of the Hungarian Revolution (English, French and Hungarian Edition) download ebook

by Sandor Kopacsi,Daniel and Judy Stoffman

In the Name of the Working Class: The Inside Story of the Hungarian Revolution (English, French and Hungarian Edition) download ebook
ISBN:
0802100104
ISBN13:
978-0802100108
Author:
Sandor Kopacsi,Daniel and Judy Stoffman
Publisher:
Grove Press; 1 edition (October 1, 1987)
Pages:
304 pages
ePUB:
1660 kb
Fb2:
1828 kb
Other formats:
lit mbr docx lrf
Category:
Europe
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Sándor Kopácsi (March 5, 1922, Miskolc – March 2, 2001, Toronto) was a participant in, and chronicler of, the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. He began his professional life as a metalworker, as did his father and grandfather

Sándor Kopácsi (March 5, 1922, Miskolc – March 2, 2001, Toronto) was a participant in, and chronicler of, the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. He began his professional life as a metalworker, as did his father and grandfather. In 1944, he fought with the resistance movement organized by MOKÁN (in English, the Anti-Nazi Committee of Hungarian Communists). After the war, many of its members (including Kopácsi) were enlisted to help form the nation's new police force

Sandor Kopacsi was Budapest's chief of police when the Hungarian Revolution erupted on October 23, 1956

Sandor Kopacsi was Budapest's chief of police when the Hungarian Revolution erupted on October 23, 1956. Arrested several weeks later for his role in the uprising a Sandor Kopacsi was Budapest's chief of police when the Hungarian Revolution erupted on October 23, 1956

MORE BY John C. Campbell. A dedicated communist and rising star in the postwar Hungarian regime, Kopacsi became chief of police (the regular civil police, not the hated security forces) in Budapest in 1952. In 1956 he supported the liberal and nationalist trends represented by Imre Nagy, sympathized with popular demands, and was named deputy commander of the new national militia. This is not the only inside story of 1956, but it is an arresting and significant one, a swiftly moving narrative studded with vivid encounters as the author, now a Canadian citizen, recalls them.

Personal Name: Kopácsi, Sándor, 1922-. Author: McGahan, Peter. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Download In the name of the working class : the inside story of the Hungarian Revolution Sandor Kopacsi ; translated by Daniel and Judy Stoffman ; with a foreword by George Jonas. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Bloomsbury group.

Translated by Daniel Stoffman and Judy Stoffman. 'In the Name of the Working Class'' recounts Mr. Kopacsi's experiences within the party and the role he played in the events of 1956. Although the book does not contain any major revelations about the Hungarian revolution, Mr. Kopacsi's background - as well as his later tribulations - give it an unusual, if not a unique perspective. Mr. Kopacsi was not among the first to lose his Communist faith

In the name of the working class : the inside story of the Hungarian Revolution Sandor Kopacsi ; translated by Daniel and Judy Stoffman ; with a foreword by George Jonas. In the name of the working class : the inside story of the Hungarian Revolution Sandor Kopacsi ; translated by Daniel and Judy Stoffman ; with a foreword by George Jonas.

In the Name of the Working Class: The Inside Story of the Hungarian Revolution. The Economic Diplomacy of the Suez Crisis. Chapel Hilclass "underline" University of North Carolina Press, 1991. New York, Grove Press, 1987. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991. Litván, György, János M. Bak, and Lyman Howard Legters. The Hungarian Revolution of 1956: Reform, Revolt, and Repression, 1953-1963. London: Longman, 1996.

French revolution was better benefit because even the king was dead in the English revolution there was still war happening in English so many or a lot of people were dead so there are no benefit for the low class to pay the feudal due. The main thing about the English revolution was th. . The main thing about the English revolution was the way between fights and wars with parliament and the king so they didn’t get a lot of benefits. So this is why I think the French revolution got more benefits than the English revolution. Unit 3 A Turbulent Time.

The Romans named the days of the week after their gods. The Germanic people adapted the Roman system and gave us the English names of the days. The Romans named the days of the week after their gods. ebravewriter with @get repost ・・・

The former Budapest chief of police recounts his participation in the 1956 Hungarian Revolution against the Soviet occupation
Reviews:
  • Ballalune
If you have any interest in what it is like to live in a society run by a socialist-led government, this book will give you a good idea of what the average person's experience was like. For those questioning the value of socialist ideas leading decisions in government, you should check this book out. From firsthand accounts, you will read of the varying views of their experiences and a good context for understanding the ins and outs of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution. It is not a complete work to helping you understand the Revolution but it is one valuable piece of the puzzle. Learn from the Hungarians' experience...
  • Madis
In a fluid translation, Kopacsi's memoirs (as police chief of 1950's Budapest and party representative) become gripping testimony to idealism and its betrayal. How does one live with lies? For the revolutionaries, they sought, in K's view, not so much a Western-style republic as a democratically-elected, neutral nation where both reforming Communists and other social democrats and other parties could share power. I found this intriguing, as I'd assumed naively that any Soviet-bloc nation yearning for liberation automatically would reject Communism--at least in 1956. As K. shows, gradually rather than suddenly, the nation edged towards revolt. In the wake of Stalin's death and the encouraging noises made by Khrushchev, Kaposci decided to back Imre Nagy and his allies against the Soviets and their Hungarian puppets.
We all know the aftermath, but Kaposci broadens his work to take in the years before 1956, so we fully understand the intrigues that made every move under the Soviets dangerous. What emerges from his account are the evasions that anyone who survived had to pretend as reality each dreary day under such a system--where early hopes had been crushed by mendacity, careerism, and brutality.
I wish he had included more about his own resistance against the Nazis, and about the prison life in the years after his show-trial, but these are minor quibbles. What you will find here is a matter-of-fact account of what it takes to be a hero, for K. and his compatriots have the chance to act nobly when so many around them turn traitor. A lesson worth remembering and passing on, as this book provides us with true role models.
  • Lightbinder
written by the chief of police of budapest during the revolt of 1956, Kopaci held the insiders view of the poltical and military situation and how the revolution unfolded. actually, this is not a review but a request for any video tapes or video documentaries on the revolt of 1956. i am writing a book that has the hungarian revoltion as its' genisis.