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The Great Stink of London: Sir Joseph Bazalgette and the Cleansing of the Victorian Metropolis download ebook

by Adam Hart-Davis,Stephen Halliday

The Great Stink of London: Sir Joseph Bazalgette and the Cleansing of the Victorian Metropolis download ebook
ISBN:
0750925809
ISBN13:
978-0750925808
Author:
Adam Hart-Davis,Stephen Halliday
Publisher:
The History Press; New Ed edition (February 1, 2001)
Language:
Pages:
224 pages
ePUB:
1761 kb
Fb2:
1501 kb
Other formats:
docx lrf mbr rtf
Category:
Europe
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

Stephen Halliday is the author of The Great Filth: Disease, Death and the Victorian City, and Newgate. While the title implies the book's focus will be London's "Great Stink" of 1858, it is in fact a short biography of the eminent Victorian civil engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette.

Stephen Halliday is the author of The Great Filth: Disease, Death and the Victorian City, and Newgate. Less remembered than his fellow engineers Isambard Brunel or Robert Stephenson, Bazalgette was the Chief Engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works for some 30 years.

In July 1958 London experienced 'The Great Stink’ . A long hot summer, where the terrible toxicity and smell of the Thames virtually drove the MPs out of the Houses of Parliament. I had never heard of Sir Joseph Bazalgette and now feel it’s an absolute crime that more people haven’t. This book takes it title from the failure of London's "great and good" to take any interest in what happened to the contents of their chamber pots once they had been sleuced into Thames tribuatories and how hot summers began to bring them nausea inducing reminders as a tidle wave of festering sludge This is an excellent book.

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Great Stink of London: Sir Joseph Bazalgette and the Cleansing of the Victorian Metropolis

Great Stink of London: Sir Joseph Bazalgette and the Cleansing of the Victorian Metropolis. by Stephen Halliday and Adam Hart-Davis. In the sweltering summer of 1858 the stink of sewage from the polluted Thames was so offensive that it drove Members of Parliament from the chamber of the House of Commons. Sewage generated by a population of over two million Londoners was pouring into the river and was being carried to and fro by the tides. The Times called the crisis "The Great Stink". Parliament had to act - drastic measures were required to clean.

Sir Joseph William Bazalgette, CB (/ˈbæzəldʒɛt/; 28 March 1819 – 15 March 1891) was a 19th-century English civil engineer. As chief engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works his major achievement was the creation (in response to the Great. As chief engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works his major achievement was the creation (in response to the Great Stink of 1858) of a sewer network for central London which was instrumental in relieving the city from cholera epidemics, while beginning the cleansing of the River Thames.

Joseph Bazalgette turned this melancholy aspect of human nature into a virtue of engineering: for him, an engineer .

Joseph Bazalgette turned this melancholy aspect of human nature into a virtue of engineering: for him, an engineer should make things so well that the user may forget about their workings, about even the fact that they are there.

Stephen Halliday's enthralling social and personal history gives a vivid insight into Bazalgette's achievements and the era in which he worked and lived. Stephen Halliday,Adam Hart-Davis No hay vista previa disponible - 2001. Términos y frases comunes. The author traces the origins of Bazalgette's family in revolutionary France, the confusing sanitation system that he inherited from medieval and Tudor times and his heroic battle with politicians, bureaucrats and huge engineering problems to transform the face and health of the world's largest city. oceedings{Halliday1999TheGS, title {The Great Stink of London: Sir Joseph Bazalgette and the Cleansing of the Victorian Metropolis}, author {Stephen Halliday}, year {1999} }. Stephen Halliday.

In the sweltering summer of 1858 the stink of sewage from the polluted Thames was so offensive that it drove Members of Parliament from the chamber of the House of Commons. Sewage generated by a population of over two million Londoners was pouring into the river and was being carried to and fro by the tides. The Times called the crisis "The Great Stink". Parliament had to act - drastic measures were required to clean the Thames and to improve London's primitive system of sanitation. The great engineer entrusted by Parliament with this enormous task was Sir Joseph Bazalgette. This book is an account of his life and work.
Reviews:
  • Thomeena
As a water engineer and a history buff, I was really looking forward to this book. It unfortunately fails to deliver on both themes. There is almost nothing that would qualify as engineering details and descriptions, when a bare minimum would have been useful.
Fair enough, I thought, let us just focus on the hero, Sir Balzagette. Sadly enough, it is difficult to judge of his capacities (planning, decision-making, management) and personality as we only get snippets in a few sentences. Actually like all the main characters (mostly politicians), he is very summarily described.
Lastly regarding the political decision process, which takes quite a bit of room, it surfaces there and then but without any continuity in the telling.

At the end of the day this book is just a series of anecdotes. This shows research, but not the needed analytical process to link these together, identify themes and tell a story. Too bad!
  • Ballagar
While the title implies the book's focus will be London's "Great Stink" of 1858, it is in fact a short biography of the eminent Victorian civil engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette. Less remembered than his fellow engineers Isambard Brunel or Robert Stephenson, Bazalgette was the Chief Engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works for some 30 years.
During his tenure, he oversaw the construction of the great intercepting sewers of London which effectively removed the recurring threat of cholera from the city even before that disease's transmission mechanism was fully understood. In addition, the great Embankments along the Thames were designed and built by Bazalgette which make the modern waterfront as we know it today. He also built three bridges still standing across the Thames and designed many of the modern thoroughfares of London.
This book focuses on the long political battles waged in Parliament, the press, and within the City itself to solve the massive problem of human waste disposal in the world's largest western metropolis of the day. Although ostensibly about a civil engineer, there is not much engineering in the book - making it highly accessible to the layperson. Copious contemporary illustrations out of "Punch" and the "Illustrated London News" along with lengthy quotations from "The Times" make the Victorians' view of this smelly problem come to life. It's fortunate that this is not a scratch-and-sniff book.
The main chapters include those devoted to the invention of the water closet (a sewage nightmare), cholera and sanitation, and the building of the embankments. Throughout the book, small sidebars give potted biographies of key players and interested parties of the day such as Dickens, W.H. Smith, Gladstone, Dr. John Snow, and others. These are great little tidbits on the people featured in the main narrative and they are liberally sprinkled with caricatures from "Spy".
The book does touch on Bazalgette's early endorsement and use of Portland cement as a technical innovation as well as the quality assurance testing techniques that he enforced during his projects. So engineer, take heart! There are interesting bits for you as well.
If dark places under the heart of the metropolis is your area of interest, see also "London Under London" by Richard Trench & Ellis Hillman for sewers, the Tube, and more subterranean passages. And if you simply must have olfactory re-enforcement to imagine the past, try "Victorian Vapours" by Mary J. Dobson.
  • Budar
The author manages to make one of the most dramatic engineering and public health stories of the nineteenth century into an excruciatingly dull read. He simply culls records of boring public meetings and dumps them into the book, all the while dropping names of people justifiably forgotten as if they were all old friends of ours. I read this book after the marvelous The Ghost Map, which told the story of London's prior efforts at sewage cleanup. What a mistake -- this book reads like the sewage it's telling about.
  • Moogugore
My father and I both enjoyed the heck out of this book. If you've ever wanted to learn about the building of a metropolitan sewer system, or get a glimpse of the impossible difficulties of public works, this is a good story. Actually fast-paced and not technically difficult, it was an easy, fun, and educational read. Makes me appreciate many things when I'm walking around London. Now, if only London would create a Sewer Museum like Paris, or if we could get the story of the Paris wastewater system....
  • Unsoo
Fascinating, exhaustive detailing...if you are interested in city infrastructures and the political climates that affect their implementation, especially for the timeless London, this is your book!
  • MilsoN
Purchased after reading Rose George's The Big Necessity.This book gives a historic perspective on London sewage. What really happens when you flush the toilet how effluent is treated and by whom learn about your waste treatment department how it functions. What federal violations and fines have been levied and why.Great read for your daily commute.
  • Gerceytone
Interest book.
Fascinating. Not overly technical and certainly could have used more technical explanations, but good history. The "phew" was not for the book.