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Church and State in America: The First Two Centuries (Cambridge Essential Histories) download ebook

by James H. Hutson

Church and State in America: The First Two Centuries (Cambridge Essential Histories) download ebook
ISBN:
0521683432
ISBN13:
978-0521683432
Author:
James H. Hutson
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (November 12, 2007)
Language:
Pages:
224 pages
ePUB:
1377 kb
Fb2:
1912 kb
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Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

I have read a number of books on America's religious history particularly in the Colonial and Revolutionary periods and this is one of the best by far. Even though it is brief, it is comprehensive in scope, giving just enough details to give a full picture of the issues without being superficial. The book is scholarly (Hutson is the Chief of the Manuscripts Division at the Library of Congress), yet very readable and in fact enjoyable. I could not put the book down. Hutson makes a good case that the Supreme Court cases in the late 19th century and mid-20th century have misread the issue employing Jefferson's phrase in a way that ignores contrary evidence.

James Hutson's reading of the founding era and what lead up to it calls into question a great deal of conventional wisdom, but does . This richly textured and text-filled study tells the unique American story of church and state.

James Hutson's reading of the founding era and what lead up to it calls into question a great deal of conventional wisdom, but does so in the most productive way-through painstakingly careful attention to specific historical evidence. Mark Noll, University of Notre Dame. This richly textured and text-filled study tells the unique American story of church and state

The First Two Centuries. Curry, Thomas . he First Freedoms: Church and State in America to the Passage of the First Amendment. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.

The First Two Centuries. Hutson analyzes and describes the development and interplay of these principles, and considers the relevance of the concept of the separation of church and state during this period. Davies, Paul C. The Debate on Eternal Punishment in Late Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century England. Eighteenth Century Studies 4, no. 3 (Spring 1971): 257–76. Religion and the Continental Congress, 1774–1789. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Cambridge Essential Histories Other books in the series. Cambridge Essential Histories (1 - 10 of 12 books). Books by James H. Hutson

Cambridge Essential Histories. as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Other books in the series. Hutson. Mor. rivia About Church and State.

Cambridge Essential Histories. 1. Church and State in Silesia under Frederick II (1740–1786). The Church confronts modernity: Catholicism since 1950 in the United States, Ireland, and Quebec. Pp. x + 432. Washington, . Catholic University of America Press, 1944. 2. Die Aeltere Geschichte der Zisterzienser Abtei Leubus in Schlesien bis zur Mitte des 14. Jahrhunderts. xii + 206. Breslau: University Press, 1947. Volume 3 Issue 2 - Claude Jenkins.

This book describes the impact and the relationship of various events, legislative, and judicial actions, including the English . James H. Hutson has been Chief of the Manuscripts Division at the Library of Congress since 1982

This book describes the impact and the relationship of various events, legislative, and judicial actions, including the English Toleration Act of 1689, the First and Second Great Awakenings, the Constitution of the United States, the Bill of Rights, and Jefferson's Letter to the Danbury Baptists. Hutson has been Chief of the Manuscripts Division at the Library of Congress since 1982. He has previously held positions as Coordinator of the American Revolution Bicentennial Programs at the Library of Congress, and as lecturer at the College of William and Mary and Yale University.

Latin America, history of - Introduction history of the region from the pre Columbian period and including colonization by the Spanish and Portuguese beginning in the 15th century, the 19th century wars of independence, and developments to the end of World War I.Universalium. Anthropology and Archaeology - ▪ 2009 Introduction Anthropology Among the key developments in 2008 in the field of physical anthropology was the discovery by a large interdisciplinary team of Spanish and American scientists in northern Spain of a partial mandible (lowe.

Cambridge Essential Histories. By (author) James H Hutson. We can notify you when this item is back in stock. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). Format Book 223 pages. Publication date 14 May 2014. Publisher CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS. Publication City/Country United States. ISBN13 9780511367519.

item 2 Cambridge Essential Histories: Church and State in America: Th. . Orthodox Church Paperback Books. Paperback The Two Towers Books. Latin America Paperback Books. North America Paperback Books.

In many ways, the story of America is a tale of the long and tortuous struggle to define and defend the rights of conscience: religious liberty as America's 'first freedom. In Church and State in America, Jim Hutson constructs this narrative-'one of the miracles of the age'-with profound insight and meticulous scholarship. He has the historian's gift for uncovering the forgotten anecdotes, animosities, proclamations, and lamentations that enlighten our understanding of the past and offer wisdom to confront the contemporary challenges to freedom

This book describes American ideas about and policies toward the relationship between government and religion from the founding of Virginia in 1607 to the presidency of Andrew Jackson, 1829-1837. Four principles were paramount during this period: the importance of religion to the public welfare; the resulting obligation of government to support religion; liberty of conscience and voluntaryism; the requirement that churches be supported by free will gifts, not taxation. The relevance of the concept of the separation of church and state during this period is examined in detail.
Reviews:
  • Redfury
VERY Informative, a Must Read for those those who want the facts and proof that the United States of America had it's beginning as a Christian Nation.
  • Meri
I enjoyed the way the item was handled. I chose this rating because it is in the same condition in which I could have gotten it at a local store.
  • Phain
The content is interesting and clarifying, BUT even with interesting original and scholarly quotes, there is NOT A SINGLE FOOTNOTE, or citation (to enable further study) in the book (though there is a Bibliography).
Eg, one reads a quote of Perry Miller describing -- importantly to the whole story -- that Roger Williams reasonings (on religious liberty) "exerted little on institutional developments in America" (p.25), but there is no citation for this. Nor for any other such in this book.
A real drawback, to an otherwise helpful work.
  • Goll
I have read a number of books on America's religious history particularly in the Colonial and Revolutionary periods and this is one of the best by far. Even though it is brief, it is comprehensive in scope, giving just enough details to give a full picture of the issues without being superficial. The book is scholarly (Hutson is the Chief of the Manuscripts Division at the Library of Congress), yet very readable and in fact enjoyable. I could not put the book down. He covers a number of fascinating details I had not encountered elsewhere in the debate on church and state. For example, Hutson was involved in the recovery of a blackened out portion of Jefferson's letter to the Danbury Baptist Association in which the famous phrase "Wall of separation between church and state" appears. With the help of the FBI, in 1998, they uncovered deleted portions of Jefferson's letter that casts a whole new light on what he meant by this phrase. The portion was struck out before being published upon advice of his attorney general for fear that it might have political repercusions. It appears Jefferson limited his understanding of the phrase to the function the president serves in matters of religion, not the government as a whole.

Hutson makes a good case that the Supreme Court cases in the late 19th century and mid-20th century have misread the issue employing Jefferson's phrase in a way that ignores contrary evidence. The fact that states like Connecticut, New Hampshire and Massachusetts maintained state sponsored church establishments through the early 19th century clearly indicates that the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment did not rule out religious establishments in the individual states. Had that been the understanding, few states would have ratified the Constitution. Furthermore, Congress funded the publishing of Bibles as well as the proselytizing of Indians in the early Republic. Regular church services were held in the House chambers until after the Civil War. In fact, Jefferson himself, no friend of orthodox Protestantism, regularly attended these services. Furthermore, church services were also held in the chambers of the Supreme Court. Those who espouse "strict" separation often ignore these facts. Hutson points them out as well as many others.

This book changed my thinking on some key issues in this debate. I highly recommend it.