cerkalo
» » It Happened in Southern Illinois (Shawnee Classics)

It Happened in Southern Illinois (Shawnee Classics) download ebook

by John W. Allen

It Happened in Southern Illinois (Shawnee Classics) download ebook
ISBN:
0809329689
ISBN13:
978-0809329687
Author:
John W. Allen
Publisher:
Southern Illinois University Press (February 23, 2010)
Language:
Pages:
440 pages
ePUB:
1997 kb
Fb2:
1602 kb
Other formats:
lit lrf lrf mbr
Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

Allen has published a southern Illinois omnibus, a Jack Horner pie that can be cut into anywhere with a good chance of pulling out . John W. Allen wrote a column, "It Happened in Southern Illinois," in the Carbondale newspaper for many years, and these columns are collected in this fine book.

Allen has published a southern Illinois omnibus, a Jack Horner pie that can be cut into anywhere with a good chance of pulling out a plum. Louis Globe Democrat. Born in an Illinois log cabin in 1887, John W. Allen grew up in Hamilton and Saline counties. Allen himself was born in a log cabin in 1887, and knew the folkways of his region well.

Start by marking It Happened in Southern Illinois as Want to Read .

Start by marking It Happened in Southern Illinois as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In this collection of articles describing the people, places, and folkways of southern Illinois, John W. Allen provides entertaining and informative glimpses into the region’s past. Included here are sketches of the early pioneering days when wolves were literally chased from the door, stories about the many Indian artifacts discovered among the rolling hills and valleys In this collection of articles describing the people, places, and folkways of southern Illinois, John W.

It Happened in Southern Illinois (Shawnee Classics). Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780809329687 (978-0-8093-2968-7) Softcover, Southern Illinois University Press, 2010. Find signed collectible books: 'It Happened in Southern Illinois (Shawnee Classics)'.

What others are saying. The Best Hikes for a Day Trip from St. Little Grand Canyon Hike in Southern Illinois. All You Can If You Love Someone Look At You Funny True Quotes Great Quotes Quotes To Live By Inspirational Quotes Daily Quotes.

In the 1950s and ‘60s, John W. Allen told the people of southern Illinois about themselves-about their region, its history, and its folkways-in his series of newspaper articles, It Happened in Southern Illinois. Originally published in 1963, Legends & Lore of Southern Illinois brings together a selection of these articles preserving a valuable body of significant local history and cultural lore. During territorial times and early statehood, southern Illinois.

Southern Illinois (also known as "Little Egypt") is the southern third of the state of Illinois. The southern part of Illinois has a unique cultural and regional history.

In this collection of articles describing the people, places, and folkways of southern Illinois, John W. Allen provides entertaining and informative glimpses into the region' s past

In this collection of articles describing the people, places, and folkways of southern Illinois, John W. Allen provides entertaining and informative glimpses into the region' s past.

Spatial and Temporal Land Use Change in Southern Illinois' Clear Springs and Bald Knob Wilderness Areas. Two Dakota Homestead Frontiers. This study provides a spatial and temporal examination of land use change in a southern Illinois wilderness area. Sources of Southern Migration into the Old Northwest The Settlement of IllinoisSources of Early Illinois Culture, Transactions of the Illinois State Historical Society for the Year 1936, Publication No. 43 (Springfield: Illinois State Historical Library The Settlement of Illinois from 1830 to 1850.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of John W Allen books online. It Happened in Southern Illinois. Pope County Notes (Classic Reprint). Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

Southern Illinois’ Shawnee National Forest and its surrounds provide an under-the-radar outdoor mecca loaded with après options, including w. .

In this collection of articles describing the people, places, and folkways of southern Illinois, John W. Allen provides entertaining and informative glimpses into the region’ s past. Included here are sketches of the early pioneering days when wolves were literally chased from the door, stories about the many Indian artifacts discovered among the rolling hills and valleys of the area, and articles pertaining to the strategic role the region played during the Civil War. Allen also describes the activities of such infamous outlaws as Samuel Mason and the Harpe brothers as well as the famous Illinois-born heroes “ Bat” Masterson, “ Wild Bill” Hickok, and Wyatt Earp. In his warm and friendly style, Allen reminisces about the self-sufficient and satisfying rural life of a previous generation with its oxcarts, pie suppers, threshing machines, kerosene lamps, and blacksmith shops. Any reader interested in southern Illinois and its history will delight in this collection of stories from John W. Allen’ s popular newspaper column, “ It Happened in Southern Illinois.”
Reviews:
  • The_NiGGa
just more of a documentation of travel through the area. Not really a story of connection between the characters.
  • cyrexoff
Loved it! Its full of real myths passed down over time. They collected from the older (and now gone) generations.
  • Risteacor
My parents were from all over S Illinois and I had heard stories. Now I am enjoying this book. Thank you.
  • Madis
This is a wonderful memory for me since I grew up in the Evansville, IN area.
  • Steamy Ibis
I have had this book for more than 30 years (a 17th birthday gift), and it remains my all-time favorite on the region where I was born, but never really got to know. John W. Allen wrote a column, "It Happened in Southern Illinois," in the Carbondale newspaper for many years, and these columns are collected in this fine book. Allen himself was born in a log cabin in 1887, and knew the folkways of his region well.
Included are profiles of prominent Southen Illinoisians like William Jennings Bryan, Pierre Menard, and William Edgar Borah; and legendary figures like riverman Mike Fink (who could outshoot Davy Crockett and who once jumped halfway across the Mississippi and, realizing he would fall a few feet short of the opposite shore, turned around and went back)and tavern-keeping outlaw Willlie Potts. There are stories of Abraham Lincoln, Lafayette, George Rogers Clark, Pontiac, Robert Ingersoll, Ned Buntline, Johnny Appleseed, Daniel Boone, and other historical figures who came here.
Ghost tales, local superstitions, home remedies, sketches of pioneer and farm life, are not neglected. We learn the differing theories on how "Egypt" came by its name, how numerous towns acquired theirs, and how industry and business developed in the area.
We meet William Newby, the soldier who disappeared during the Civil War and whose attempts to reunite with his family many years later led to persecution and imprisonment as an old man. There are also blacksmiths, itinerant peddlers, river pirates, tall-tale tellers, and other long-vanished characters of the American scene.
Allen's affectionate yet clear-eyed prose avoids the usual traps of books on the folkways of the rural past. This is neither a dry piece of scholarship ("A variant on Tale 17 was found in __________, on September 7, 19__, related by Mrs. __________________.")nor a collection of rose-colored, sentimental reminiscences of interest only to the teller. And at some 400 pages, it's no skimpy sampler. It's a 10-gallon jug of cider, a big bushel basket of freshly-picked Southern Illinois peaches; and you can reach in anywhere and pull out a good one.
Reading this book is like taking a long, leisurely stroll with the author along the town streets, through the woods, along the rivers, and even in the graveyards. You can almost smell the musty barns, lye soap, and sorghum; and hear the drawling voice of the local sage holding court around the pot-bellied stove in the general store, and the kids playing in the yard of a one-room school.
I still read this fine book on cold nights, and never tire of its winding trails of information. Whether you come from this fascinating and mysterious part of the country (closer to the Tennesse hills than to Chicago)or simply are curious about a vanished past, Legends and Lore will keep you both informed and entertained.
P.S. Editor Irving Dilliard's introduction alone is almost worth the price of the book. He gives us a (too brief) introduction to the long and often adventurous life of John W. Allen, known as "The best friend Southern Illinois ever had." What a pity Allen never wrote his autobiography.
  • Zaryagan
If you are looking for the history of Illinois from an everyday view then this book will be a great resource. I was pleased at the variety of subjects it covered and the details of everyday life. There were also interesting stories on individuals. I really liked this book and gleaned a lot of information from it for a talk I was doing on life in the 1840's.
  • Dreladred
I have been doing research for a senior thesis on Southern Illinois regarding its involvement and possible support of the Confederacy in the Civil War. While this book was one of the first I read in an effort to go deeper into the politics and mindset of the south I found several items almost unneeded in terms of the fork lore and the way of speech. While it does provide interesting background imagery of the people when trying to get the facts these items seem to create hills which must be scaled in order to engage the material you want to read. Furthermore he goes on to reference people such as Wyatt Earp, who while born in Illinois only lived in this area for a very short period (2-3 years) before his family moved to Iowa where he truly grew up. While Allen's book does have interesting insight on many historical events he seems to get stuck in reliving the better times of the old ways of Southern Illinois.