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An End to Poverty?: A Historical Debate download ebook

by Gareth Stedman Jones

An End to Poverty?: A Historical Debate download ebook
ISBN:
0231137826
ISBN13:
978-0231137829
Author:
Gareth Stedman Jones
Publisher:
Columbia University Press (September 28, 2005)
Language:
Pages:
288 pages
ePUB:
1488 kb
Fb2:
1206 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

In An End to Poverty? Gareth Stedman Jones revisits this founding moment in the history of social democracy and examines how it was derailed by conservative as well as leftist thinkers. By tracing the historical evolution of debates concerning poverty, Stedman Jones revives an important, but forgotten strain of progressive thought. He also demonstrates that current discussions about economic issues - downsizing, globalization, and financial regulation - were shaped by the ideological conflicts of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

In An End to Poverty? Gareth Stedman Jones revisits this founding moment in the history of social democracy and .

In An End to Poverty? Gareth Stedman Jones revisits this founding moment in the history of social democracy and examines how it was derailed by conservative as well as leftist thinkers.

An End to Poverty? book. by. Gareth Stedman Jones. The debate on world poverty and globalisation is one which began two centuries ago in the wake of the French Revolution. A major historian traces the history of those arguments and relates them to current discussions and policies.

Article · March 2006. DOI: 1. 5071/1913-9632.

Contributors: Gareth Stedman Jones. Subjects: Poverty-History. Making Poverty History: There Is No Secret about What It Takes to End Poverty. We Just Have to Get Serious about Doing It By Greenberg, Mark The American Prospect, Vol. 18, No. 5, May 2007. Make Poverty History By Furtado, Peter History Today, Vol. 55, No. 1, January 2005. Tourism Concern Make Tourism Poverty History By Sargent, Jo Geographical, Vol. 77, No. 6, June 2005.

Gareth Stedman Jones

Gareth Stedman Jones. It is very disappointing to see so little information provided by the publisher on this book, not even a table of contents.

A Historical Debate'. Author: Gareth Stedman Jones

A Historical Debate'. Author: Gareth Stedman Jones. An End to Poverty? A Historical Debate. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.

A Historical Debate torrent or any other torrent from the Other E-books. Whether poverty is a social ill, an individual failing or an unavoidable byproduct of economic progress is a still-roiling controversy. This engaging study examines the unfolding of the debate in Europe from the late 18th century to the beginning of WW I. Cambridge University political scientist Jones grounds his treatment in the ideas of Adam Smith, whom he wishes to reclaim from free-market fundamentalists.

An End to Poverty? reconstructs those debates, offering an excitingly redrawn map of intellectual history. It also makes a powerful case about our political present and future. Rethinking the origins of modern thought about poverty, so Stedman Jones urges, gives us the chance to re-imagine alternatives. In the wake of the American and French revolutions, a handful of visionary theorists offered a programme for change which sorely needs renewal today. The heroes of his story are a French aristocrat and an Englishman of plebeian origins.

In the 1790s, for the first time, reformers proposed bringing poverty to an end. Inspired by scientific progress, the promise of an international economy, and the revolutions in France and the United States, political thinkers such as Thomas Paine and Antoine-Nicolas Condorcet argued that all citizens could be protected against the hazards of economic insecurity. In An End to Poverty? Gareth Stedman Jones revisits this founding moment in the history of social democracy and examines how it was derailed by conservative as well as leftist thinkers. By tracing the historical evolution of debates concerning poverty, Stedman Jones revives an important, but forgotten strain of progressive thought. He also demonstrates that current discussions about economic issues―downsizing, globalization, and financial regulation―were shaped by the ideological conflicts of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.Paine and Condorcet believed that republicanism combined with universal pensions, grants to support education, and other social programs could alleviate poverty. In tracing the inspiration for their beliefs, Stedman Jones locates an unlikely source-Adam Smith. Paine and Condorcet believed that Smith's vision of a dynamic commercial society laid the groundwork for creating economic security and a more equal society. But these early visions of social democracy were deemed too threatening to a Europe still reeling from the traumatic aftermath of the French Revolution and increasingly anxious about a changing global economy. Paine and Condorcet were demonized by Christian and conservative thinkers such as Burke and Malthus, who used Smith's ideas to support a harsher vision of society based on individualism and laissez-faire economics. Meanwhile, as the nineteenth century wore on, thinkers on the left developed more firmly anticapitalist views and criticized Paine and Condorcet for being too "bourgeois" in their thinking. Stedman Jones however, argues that contemporary social democracy should take up the mantle of these earlier thinkers, and he suggests that the elimination of poverty need not be a utopian dream but may once again be profitably made the subject of practical, political, and social-policy debates.