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Indian Giving: Economies of Power in Indian-White Exchanges (Native Americans of the Northeast) download ebook

by David Murray

Indian Giving: Economies of Power in Indian-White Exchanges (Native Americans of the Northeast) download ebook
ISBN:
1558492437
ISBN13:
978-1558492431
Author:
David Murray
Publisher:
University of Massachusetts Press (August 21, 2000)
Language:
Pages:
296 pages
ePUB:
1915 kb
Fb2:
1717 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf lit rtf
Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

David Murray, Heritage Book Shop Former Owner.

book by David Murray. Whether they involved goods, words, or ideas, acts of giving and trading were fundamental in early Indian-white contacts. But how did these transactions function across the two cultures, and what did they mean to each? In this book, David Murray explores a range of early exchanges between Europeans and Indians, showing how they operated within a set of interlocking economies - linguistic, religious, as well as material. David Murray, Heritage Book Shop Former Owner. Music of the Scottish Regiments: Cogadh No Sith War or Peace.

Books in this series examine the diverse cultures and histories of the Indian peoples of New England, the Middle Atlantic states, eastern Canada . Indian Giving Economies of Power in Indian-White Exchanges.

Books in this series examine the diverse cultures and histories of the Indian peoples of New England, the Middle Atlantic states, eastern Canada, and the Great Lakes region. Manuscript Submissions. Colin G. Calloway Native American Studies Dartmouth College colin. Jean M. O'Brien History University of Minnesota [email protected]

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

A volume in the Native Americans of the Northeast: Culture, History and the. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Indian Giving: Economies of Power in Indian-White Exchanges as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Planning for the handbook series began in the late 1960s and work was initiated following a special congressional appropriation in fiscal year 1971. To date, 15 volumes have been published

David Murray is Professor of American Studies at the University of Nottingham. He is the author of many books, including Indian Giving: Economies of Power in Early Indian-White Exchanges.

David Murray is Professor of American Studies at the University of Nottingham. Библиографические данные. Matter, Magic, and Spirit: Representing Indian and African American Belief.

Native Americans, also known as American Indians, Indigenous Americans and other terms, are the indigenous peoples of the United States, except Hawaii and territories of the United States

Native Americans, also known as American Indians, Indigenous Americans and other terms, are the indigenous peoples of the United States, except Hawaii and territories of the United States. More than 570 federally recognized tribes live within the US, about half of which are associated with Indian reservations.

Cultural assimilation of Native Americans. The cultural assimilation of Native Americans was an assimilation effort by the United States to transform Native American culture to European–American culture between the years of 1790 and 1920. George Washington and Henry Knox were first to propose, in an American context, the cultural transformation of Native Americans. They formulated a policy to encourage the civilizing process.

In Native American contexts, dreaming is a form of knowledge. The Northeast is also associated with thunder and is represented by the bear and the color black. Northwest: marked by Yellow Star. It reveals the activities of the mysterious powers-their engagement with or relationship to the dreamer. The Northwest is associated with lightning and is represented by the mountain lion and the color yellow.

The Northeast Indians. The mid-Atlantic Algonquians. Others, including the historian David Henige, criticize some of the assumptions Dobyns made in his analyses. The Iroquoians of Huronia. Native American history is made additionally complex by the diverse geographic and cultural backgrounds of the peoples involved. As one would expect, indigenous American farmers living in stratified societies, such as the Natchez, engaged with Europeans differently than did those who relied on hunting and gathering, such as the Apache.

Fritz Scholder: Indian/Not Indian is a brilliant examination of the preeminent Native American artist of the twentieth centur. .Characterized by psychological complexity, Fritz Scholder’s work led the way to a bold, new kind of Indian art and enriched American art history.

Whether they involved goods, words, or ideas, acts of giving and trading were fundamental in early Indian-white contacts. But how did these transactions function across the two cultures, and what did they mean to each? In this book, David Murray explores a range of early exchanges between Europeans and Indians, showing how they operated within a set of interlocking economies -- linguistic, religious, as well as material. Murray begins by examining the crucial role of gift-giving. Like the double function of the key, which both locks and unlocks, the gift -- with its simultaneous action of offering something and demanding a return -- expressed the paradoxical nature of early Indian-white encounters. Because the power to give was associated with ideas of sovereignty, both sides often preferred to represent exchanges as gift-giving rather than trading or selling. To illustrate the complexities of these cross-cultural transactions, the author looks closely at the work of linguist, trader, and missionary Roger Williams, whose A Key into the Language of America at once serves the purposes of translation, conversion, and trade. Murray also examines the changing meaning and representation of wampum, the quintessential medium of exchange in the early colonial period, as well as the multiple processes of conversion taking place as Christian ideas were incorporated into Indian cultures. According to the author, only by recognizing the ways in which objects and ideas circulated and took on value in interrelated economies can we understand the contested "middle ground" between Europeans and Indians of the colonial Northeast.