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Chainbreaker: The Revolutionary War Memoirs of Governor Blacksnake (American Indian Lives) download ebook

by Chainbreaker,Thomas S. Abler,Benjamin Williams

Chainbreaker: The Revolutionary War Memoirs of Governor Blacksnake (American Indian Lives) download ebook
ISBN:
0803214464
ISBN13:
978-0803214460
Author:
Chainbreaker,Thomas S. Abler,Benjamin Williams
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press; First Edition edition (October 1, 1989)
Language:
Pages:
288 pages
ePUB:
1264 kb
Fb2:
1708 kb
Other formats:
docx rtf txt lrf
Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

One of the earliest memoirs by an American Indian, Chainbreaker presents the recollections of a Seneca chief.

One of the earliest memoirs by an American Indian, Chainbreaker presents the recollections of a Seneca chief. -Anthony F. C. Wallace, Ethnohistory. Anthony F. Wallace Ethnohistory). A rare look at the Indian side of the Revolution.

Blacksnake, Governor, ca. 1753-1859; Williams, Benjamin, 1803-1861; Abler, Thomas S. .1753-1859, Seneca Indians, Seneca Indians, Indians of North America, Indians of North America. the original books is too bright. (Thomas Struthers), 1941-. Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Chainbreaker is one of the earliest memoirs of an American Indian-a Seneca chief know as Governor Blacksnake to his white neighbors on the New York frontier

Chainbreaker is one of the earliest memoirs of an American Indian-a Seneca chief know as Governor Blacksnake to his white neighbors on the New York frontier. A fighter in the American Revolution, the old chief (who also went by the name Chainbreaker) had an exciting story to tell to his fellow Seneca, Benjamin Williams, in the mid-nineteenth century.

One of the earliest memoirs by an American Indian, Chainbreaker presents the recollections of a Seneca chief, also known as Governor Blacksnake

Series: American Indian Lives. One of the earliest memoirs by an American Indian, Chainbreaker presents the recollections of a Seneca chief, also known as Governor Blacksnake. A fighter in the American Revolution who lived more than a century, Chainbreaker told his story as an old man in the 1840s to a fellow Seneca, Benjamin Williams, who translated it and committed it to paper. Epic in scale and yet intensely personal, Chainbreaker’s story provides a rare Native view of warfare and diplomacy during a crucial period in American history.

Tah-won-ne-ahs or Thaonawyuthe (born between 1737 and 1760, died 1859), known in English as either Governor Blacksnake or Chainbreaker, was a Seneca war chief and leader. Along with other Iroquois war chiefs (most notably Mohawk leader Joseph Brant), he led warriors to fight on the side of the British during the American Revolutionary War from 1777 to 1783.

One of the earliest memoirs by an American Indian, Chainbreaker presents the recollections of a Seneca chief, also known as Governor Blacksnake

One of the earliest memoirs by an American Indian, Chainbreaker presents the recollections of a Seneca chief, also known as Governor Blacksnake. Epic in scale and yet intensely personal, Chainbreaker's story provides a rare Native view of warfare and diplomacy during a crucial period in American history.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Chainbreaker: The Revolutionary War Memoirs of.One of the earliest memoirs by an American Indian, Chainbreaker presents the recollections of a Seneca chief, also kwn as Goverr Blacksnake.

One of the earliest memoirs by an American Indian, Chainbreaker presents the recollections of a Seneca chief, also kwn as Goverr Blacksnake.

Chainbreaker: the Revolutionary War Memoirs of Governor Blacksnake as told to Benjamin Williams. Chainbreaker's War: a Seneca Chief Remembers the American Revolution. Hensonville, NY: Black Dome Press, 2002. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1989. Memoirs of war chief Chainbreaker, nephew of Handsome Lake, as recorded by fellow Seneca Benjamin Williams in 1833-34.

One of the earliest memoirs by an American Indian, Chainbreaker presents the. Start by marking Chainbreaker: The Revolutionary War Memoirs of Governor Blacksnake as told to Benjamin Williams as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Chainbreaker by Blacksnake Governor, Chainbreaker, Benjamin . The Revolutionary War Memoirs of Governor Blacksnake (American Indian Lives).

The Revolutionary War Memoirs of Governor Blacksnake (American Indian Lives). by Blacksnake Governor, Chainbreaker, Benjamin Williams. Published October 1, 1989 by University of Nebraska Press.

Chainbreaker is one of the earliest memoirs of an American Indian—a Seneca chief know as Governor Blacksnake to his white neighbors on the New York frontier. A fighter in the American Revolution, the old chief (who also went by the name Chainbreaker) had an exciting story to tell to his fellow Seneca, Benjamin Williams, in the mid-nineteenth century. His account is now published in its entirety for the first time, with extensive commentary by Thomas S. Abler setting the text in historical perspective.

The narrative begins with a flurry of diplomatic activity as the English and the rebellious Americans eagerly seek alliances with the Senecas and other tribes in the Iroquois Confederacy. Only in 1777 did Iroquois warriors enter the conflict. Blacksnake describes the fighting as he saw it on such fields as Oriskany, Wyoming, and Newtown. Educated not only to the warpath but to the council fire, he is sensitive to the central role his people played in peace negotiations after the defeat of the British. He describes also the efforts of the Senecas to promote peace between the Americans and the still hostile Indians of the Ohio country. Blacksnake was well placed to make and observe history: One of his uncles was Cornplanter, a prominent figure during the Revolutionary War and its aftermath. Another uncle was the prophet Handsome Lake, whose vision in 1799 led to a revitalization of Seneca religion and culture and is recounted here. Blacksnake’s story provides a rare Indian view of warfare and diplomacy during a time when the Six Nations of the Iroquois still played a major role in the history of North America.

Reviews:
  • August
"Chainbreaker: The Revolutionary War Memoirs of Governor Blacksnake, as told to Benjamin Williams," is edited by Thomas S. Abler, who also contributes an introduction and notes. The primary text is a first-person account by a Seneca Indian chief who fought during the American Revolution, and delivered his story orally to another Indian who committed it to writing. In addition to providing an overall introduction for the book, editor Abler also has written individual introductions for each section of the Blacksnake narrative. This supplemental material helps place Blacksnake's words in context.

Abler discusses in detail the background and history of the Blacksnake manuscript. He notes that this text "provides a rare Indian view of warfare and of diplomacy in a period when the Six Nations of the Iroquois still played a prominent and significant role in the development of North America" (p. 8). Abler discusses Blacksnake's family, his names, his people's culture, the Iroquois Confederacy as a political entity, and relations among the British, the revolutionary colonists, and Native Americans. It's a fascinating backdrop for Blacksnake's own story.

Blacksnake's own words show conflict within the Indian community, relations with white people, and the role of Indian women. He describes combat involving firearms, tomahawks, knives, and the "war whoop." Also covered in the book is the religious vision and career of Blacksnake's uncle, the prophet Handsome Lake. Appendices to the primary text include an intriguing series of communications between George Washington and Seneca leaders.

Abler notes that the Blacksnake/Williams text is written in "somewhat individualistic English"; I imagine many contemporary readers will find the text quite difficult, and will be thankful for Abler's clearly written supplementary text. The text is also enhanced by a wealth of visual materials, including maps, a daguerreotype of the elderly Blacksnake, reproductions of historic illustrations of other Indian leaders, photographs of historic wampum belts, and more. Also worthy of note is the extensive bibliography. This is a fascinating book, but I found it to be tragic and sad; it seems to me that in the main text and supplemental materials we can see the decline of the Iroquois Confederacy from a true military and political force to a marginalized people. Despite this downbeat aspect, the book is a real tribute to Blacksnake, Handsome Lake, and other remarkable Indian leaders. Overall, Abler has assembled a valuable contribution to both Native American studies and United States military history. Recommended companion text: "Geronimo: His Own Story," edited by Frederick Turner.
  • Grarana
The memoirs of this Native American centenarian don't just chronicle the events of early Colonial American expansion into Indian territory; it provides a glimpse into the culture that was tragically displaced. Modern Americans can learn valuable lessons from the accepting and positive spirit of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) that Chainbreaker exemplifies.