cerkalo
» » Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War

Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War download ebook

by Dan Oreskes,Tony Horwitz

Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War download ebook
ISBN:
142721316X
ISBN13:
978-1427213167
Author:
Dan Oreskes,Tony Horwitz
Publisher:
Macmillan Audio; Unabridged edition (October 25, 2011)
Language:
ePUB:
1505 kb
Fb2:
1931 kb
Other formats:
mbr mobi doc lit
Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

Tony Horwitz's gifts as a vivid narrator of dramatic events are on full display in this story of John Brown's wars in Kansas and his climactic Harpers Ferry raid in 1859.

Tony Horwitz's gifts as a vivid narrator of dramatic events are on full display in this story of John Brown's wars in Kansas and his climactic Harpers Ferry raid in 1859. James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom.

John Brown in Boston in 1859, before the raid on Harpers Ferry. Horwitz moves nimbly through Brown’s deepening involvement in the movement in the 1830s and ’40s, setting his devotion alongside the growing national conflict over slavery’s place in a country ostensibly dedicated to equality. Abolitionism was then dominated by pacifists like Garrison, who insisted that the evil could be destroyed by moral suasion.

Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid that Sparked the Civil Wa. Tony Horwitz's riveting book travels antebellum America to deliver both a taut historical drama and a telling portrait of a nation divided-a time that still resonates in ours. A Macmillan Audio production

Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid that Sparked the Civil War. Written by Tony Horwitz. Narrated by Dan Oreskes. Bestselling author Tony Horwitz tells the electrifying tale of the daring insurrection that put America on the path to bloody war. Plotted in secret, launched in the dark, John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry was a pivotal moment in . A Macmillan Audio production. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Midnight Rising book . The raid also helped elect Abraham Lincoln, who later began to fulfill Brown's dream with the Emancipation Proclamation, a measure he called "a John Brown raid, on a gigantic scale.

Horwitz won a 1994 James Aronson Award and the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for his stories about working conditions in low-wage . Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War. Henry Holt.

Horwitz won a 1994 James Aronson Award and the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for his stories about working conditions in low-wage America published in The Wall Street Journal He documented his venture into e-publishing and reaching best-seller status in that venue in an opinion article for The New York Times.

Tony Downs Photography. Stainless Steel Fabricators Perth.

See actions taken by the people who manage and post content. Tony Downs Photography.

Tony Horwitz on John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil Wa.

Tony Horwitz on John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War. 'Midnight Rising' brings the abolitionist to life. John Brown played a major role in the Civil War, leading the fight against slavery. Art by Chris Wormell/MENDOLA. Listen to a clip from the Midnight Rising audio book narrated by Dan Oreskes. Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Tony Horwitz takes us into the mind of Brown, using letters and interviews to perch us on Brown's shoulder.

As Tony Horwitz writes in this vivid retelling of the twice-told tale, what Brown called ‘the great work of my life’ had just .

As Tony Horwitz writes in this vivid retelling of the twice-told tale, what Brown called ‘the great work of my life’ had just ended in abject failure. Instead of a months-long campaign reaching across the South, his attack had withered in thirty-two hours, a stone’s throw inside Virginia. The nation was irrevocably divided.

After reading Tony Horwitz's Midnight Rising, I now understand why people believe this about John Brown, but to. .This is the Civil War history that they don't teach you in school.

After reading Tony Horwitz's Midnight Rising, I now understand why people believe this about John Brown, but to label him crazy is much too simplistic for a deeply complex man whose upbringing was the perfect intersection of time, place and temperament. Horwitz delves into the early life of John Brown, his staunch abolitionism and how it was tied into his Calvinist faith, and the path that led him across the states and territories of a young America and to the unsuccessful raid that brought a head to the simmering ill will between the free and slave states.

A New York Times Notable Book for 2011A Library Journal Top Ten Best Books of 2011A Boston Globe Best Nonfiction Book of 2011

Bestselling author Tony Horwitz tells the electrifying tale of the daring insurrection that put America on the path to bloody war

Plotted in secret, launched in the dark, John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry was a pivotal moment in U.S. history. But few Americans know the true story of the men and women who launched a desperate strike at the slaveholding South. Now, Midnight Rising portrays Brown's uprising in vivid color, revealing a country on the brink of explosive conflict.

Brown, the descendant of New England Puritans, saw slavery as a sin against America's founding principles. Unlike most abolitionists, he was willing to take up arms, and in 1859 he prepared for battle at a hideout in Maryland, joined by his teenage daughter, three of his sons, and a guerrilla band that included former slaves and a dashing spy. On October 17, the raiders seized Harpers Ferry, stunning the nation and prompting a counterattack led by Robert E. Lee. After Brown's capture, his defiant eloquence galvanized the North and appalled the South, which considered Brown a terrorist. The raid also helped elect Abraham Lincoln, who later began to fulfill Brown's dream with the Emancipation Proclamation, a measure he called "a John Brown raid, on a gigantic scale."

Tony Horwitz's riveting book travels antebellum America to deliver both a taut historical drama and a telling portrait of a nation divided―a time that still resonates in ours.

Reviews:
  • Getaianne
This book reads like a first-rate novel except that it is true. Horwitz not only fleshes out the life of John Brown but keeps the reader on edge in the process. Horwitz’s writing is fluent and well-organized. He does a great job showing how Brown’s single-minded fanaticism caused both enormous harm such as the slaughter of the Kansas settlers and at the same time brought about his heroic dimension (like Brown’s absolute devotion to ending slavery and his lack of fear of death after his conviction). Horwitz’s psychological analysis of Brown is insightful but never goes beyond the evidence. The book brings to life John Brown, those who supported and opposed him and the events leading up to, during, and after the Harpers Ferry raid. It is one of most engaging history books I have read. Readers interested in “living” history will not be disappointed.
  • Tat
A very balanced presentation of John Brown the man and John Brown the activist. Horwitz presents the material and allows you to draw your own conclusions, which is how history SHOULD be presented.

My take away is that John Brown the man was very intelligent but also very irresponsible and egotistical. Somewhat of a charlatan when it came to business ventures as he was always in legal troubles. He did not do an adequate job providing for his wife and very large family. Violent and dogmatic, he was not the type of steadfast, compassionate father figure one would hope have growing up.

His one exceptional redeeming quality seemed to be that he regarded Blacks as co-equals deserving the same rights and privileges he had. This sets him apart from so many other abolitionists of the antebellum period, who wished to end slavery not out of compassion, but out of a desire to end the proliferation of the black race in North America (Lincoln being the most famous of those). One need only look at how Blacks were treated in the north, post Civil War or how all their "northern liberators" treated the Native Americans immediately following the war, to understand the overwhelming motivation behind the anti-slavery movement.

A fairly quick and worthwhile read.
  • DrayLOVE
Tony Horwitz has written a thoroughly researched and eminently readable account of the life of one of history's most complicated and vexing characters. John Brown was a visionary hero ahead of his time. He was also a radical outlaw willing to match violence for violence and even take life in cold blood. He was also a seriously flawed human being whose inflexible nature and single-minded devotion to his cause and utter inability to manage business affairs left his wife and brood of children in near poverty and very likely imperiled his own mission. There is simply no way to reconcile this singularly complex figure into any of the neat packages history has tried to stuff him into - whether hero, madman or villain. Yet this fanatical hero-villain, in the course of a blundered raid, lit the spark that ended slavery and exploded the "Southern Way of Life".

After a brief prologue setting the stage for the raid on Harper's ferry, Horwitz returns to the beginning to trace what is known - and what Brown himself reported - of Brown's childhood and early life. Brown was raised by a strict Calvinist who espoused hard work, piety, strident punishment of sins, and the equality of all people, including blacks - a radical idea at the time, even among abolitionists. John, left motherless at age eight by his mother's death in childbirth, seems to have emulated his father in both temperament and action.

Early in this life, Brown "consecrated" himself to the cause of ending slavery, and he enlisted his wife and sons as a sort of independent army. While his business affairs careened up and down, Brown's passion, determination and independence brought him the attention - and financial support - of wealthy Abolitionist backers from Gerrit Smith to William Lloyd Garrison.

Brown's initial cause was keeping Kansas a free state during the fierce "Bleeding Kansas" period when both pro- and anti-slavery interests were pumping settlers into the new territory. Brown believed, rightly, that there was too little check on the pro-slavery forces who were using violence and intimidation to enforce their way. Brown came to believe that the non-violent response of the anti-slavery movement was inadequate, so in the middle of the night Brown, several of his sons and some allies abducted, killed and apparently mutilated six men believed to be important leaders of the pro-slavery faction. Brown and his allies both denied responsibility and claimed self-defense, but Horwitz dissects these defenses and concludes that the killings were likely carried out to inspire fear and deter future violence. Such an act could justifiably be labeled terrorism, but then, one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter. But regardless of the effect on Kansas, the effect on Brown's men was devastating. In addition to some physical wounds, some of the participants suffered mental breakdowns and life-long impairment. Brown himself, however, was unscathed and ready to do further battle.

Following the massacre, Brown, now an outlaw and a wanted man, retreated back east where he carried on his crusade in various forms while planning his attack on "Africa", Brown's code word for the slave-holding South. While imploring money from his benefactors and recruiting soldiers to his cause, Brown spoke of raids along the Southern border to free slaves (who would, it was believed, join Brown's band), strike fear into the hearts of slave owners, and make slave holding economically unviable. But little by little, through both coded references and open admission, Brown began to make it clear that something bigger was in the works, although what the something was, and what was the ultimate aim, remained rather muddy even as Brown and his rag-tag band of diverse followers began the march on Harper's Ferry.

Often throughout his life, Brown proclaimed that he received his orders from God. If that were true, then God is a pretty lousy general. Horwitz presents a masterful portrayal of the raid on Harper's Ferry, the bungling involved, the sheer luck that it succeeded as well as it did, and the tragedy along the way. Inadequate men, lack of communication and poor coordination of supplies hampered efforts from the beginning. An early and unintended shooting of a free black man (ironically, by white men seeking to liberate blacks, as Horwitz points out) was an ill omen and aroused the anger of the town. Brown failed to take into account the arrival of a train on the bridge to Harper's Ferry, and he wildly underestimated the support he would receive from both the townsfolk and the freed slaves (what few slaves he actually freed, that is). Furthermore, even once he captured the arsenal, Brown failed to use any of the federal arms or ammunition.

But as big a failure as the raid seemed to be, the aftermath of the raid brought much of the success Brown appeared to be seeking. Brown comported himself with composed dignity and did not flinch at the prospect of death. He willingly, even eagerly, met and spoke with all who sought him out (except his own wife, that is), especially pro-slavery advocates. Through inspired and eloquent speeches, writings and conversations, Brown sought to propound his vision of a just and equal society without the evils of slavery and oppression. He sought to make Southerners see the error of their ways and convert to Abolition. He largely failed on that count, but he did impress his opponents with his courage and conviction. He also appealed to Northern Abolitionists to bring pressure to bear against the iniquity of slavery.

Horwitz speculates - compellingly - that this platform to speak and be heard is what lay beneath the raid all along. Brown could never have expected to hold Harper's Ferry or free very many slaves. And ultimately, despite his violent acts, Brown was too conflicted and ambivalent about using violence to end slavery. Brown claimed not to want to take life, but the one life he could offer was his own. Through his martyrdom, Brown hoped to achieve what he and his meager band of followers could not otherwise achieve. And through is dignity and courage in his final days and his clarion call to the decency of all humans, he did in fact, in many ways, achieve what his violence did not.

Wrestling with the morality of the life of John Brown is no easy task. Is violence ever acceptable, even to end a great injustice? What about the men Brown lured into his fanatical plot without fully informing them of his plans - was it right to make martyrs of them too? What about free black porter Heyward Shepherd and the other innocent victims? And what right did Brown have to make his wife a widow and leave his children fatherless? Furthermore, this wrestling has to take into account the conditions and realities of Brown's time. It's easy now to point to the actual end of slavery as justification, but Brown had no way of knowing when or if slavery might end or how his actions might affect those bound in slavery. Following Brown's raid, life for slaves got a good deal harder, as slave owners became even more fearful of rebellion. Had the Civil War not ended slavery, Brown's actions would have been no favor to blacks bound in that "peculiar institution".

These issues and many more will never be neat and clean, but Horwitz does an excellent job of wrestling with them. Horwitz rules out the madman option, but wavers somewhat between the hero and villain, ultimately landing on the hero side. However, he pulls no punches and makes no attempt to tidy up history or present Brown as an unblemished hero. Horwitz closely examines the historical facts, dissects them this way and that, and paints a painfully honest and detailed portrait of villain-hero John Brown against the ugly backdrop of the times in which he lived. Highly recommended for all adults as well as kids who are mature enough and ready to wrestle with weighty, ambiguous moral issues.