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A Guide to the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692 download ebook

by David C. Brown

A Guide to the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692 download ebook
ISBN:
0961341505
ISBN13:
978-0961341503
Author:
David C. Brown
Publisher:
David C Brown; 2d ptg. edition (June 1, 1984)
Language:
Pages:
132 pages
ePUB:
1368 kb
Fb2:
1356 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

It was written as a traveler's guide to the vicinity of Salem and includes maps, photos and original quotes. This book is a must read regards the individual and mass human psyche. What was done by all should be Another October read. The author states in the preface that it is written as a tour guide. It is broken up into four sections: a compact, well written history, a useful chronology of important events, a guide to important locations and finally maps of showing those locations in Danvers, Salem and Beverly.

The following work has been written to afford those visiting the Salem environs a means of acquainting themselves with the physical remains of the outbreak o. .

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In the opening chapter, Norton directly connects the witchcraft hysteria to the First and Second Indian Wars. Norton vividly describes how a group of a hundred and fifty Wabanakis Indians raided and burned the settlement of York, Maine in 1691.

Learn about what led to the allegations and the hundreds of people who were were accused. As a wave of hysteria spread throughout colonial Massachusetts, a special court convened in Salem to hear the cases; the first convicted witch, Bridget Bishop, was hanged that June. Eighteen others followed Bishop to Salem’s Gallows Hill, while some 150 more men, women and children were accused over the next several months.

A brief history of the Salem Witch Hysteria of 1692, David Brown does a good job of.Best short introduction to the topic that I've seen. I was expecting this to be a guidebook to Salem, Mass

A brief history of the Salem Witch Hysteria of 1692, David Brown does a good job of condensing down the happenings and facts into a slim volume that cuts out the extra details and basically gives you a 'just the facts' history of that year. Included are also maps of the areas with the pertinent locations marked, so that if you were to visit the area, you could find these locations easily. I was expecting this to be a guidebook to Salem, Mass. but this turns out to be a remarkably good short history of the witchhunting hysteria of 1692, with a short travel guide appended.

More than two hundred people were accused. Thirty were found guilty, nineteen of whom were executed by hanging (fourteen women and five men). One other man, Giles Corey, was pressed to death for refusing to plead, and at least five people died in jail.

Best Answer: Aronson, Marc. ISBN 0814713076 Brown, David .A Guide to the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692. David C. Brown: Washington Crossing, PA. 1984. ISBN 1416903151 Boyer, Paul & Nissenbaum, Stephen. Salem Possessed: The Social Origins of Witchcraft. Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA. 1974. ISBN 0674785266 Boyer, Paul & Nissenbaum, Stephen, ed. ISBN 0961341505 Burns, Margo & Rosenthal, Bernard.

The Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692.

Calendars & Planners. The Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692.

The following work has been written to afford those visiting the Salem environs a means of acquainting themselves with the physical remains of the outbreak of witchcraft in Essex County in 1692. It is not intended to shed fundamentally new light of the events of that year; rather, it should serve to sketch the history of the era and integrate that history with a list of the sites still extant today.
Reviews:
  • BlackBerry
Based on the reviews, I was expecting a good read with detailed info about surviving structures and locations. I was disappointed. The author repeats the old falsehoods or legends about Tituba and voodoo, a gaggle of giggling fortunetelling girls, and Bridget Bishop being a bawdy tavernkeeper, despite modern research either disproving or casting serious doubt on their veracity. There are photographs of houses included in the book that are supposed to be tied to specific parties involved in the crisis, but little proof or even meaningful directions to the houses (ex: John Proctor house, which I can't find credibly referenced anywhere else). Where the book isn't poorly written, I just can't recommend it.

Serious students should save their money; legends and rumors are available for free on the Internet.
  • Felolune
Nice book. I had been looking for a book that showed various sites. You can still visit these sites.
  • Shalizel
I bought this book for a school paper and I have yet to read, but from the reviews I read about this book people loved it and said it was straight forward to the facts.
Book was in great condition and arrived quick!
  • Modifyn
Happy with purchase for the price and it was exactly as described! Thank you!
  • Ishnsius
This book is an enjoyable and excellent read. It allows greater insight to the victims as well as a view of the mindset of others who suffered and experienced this tragic event than other books I've read on this subject. I purchased this Guide after learning that it was a source and reference for the music and story in the Believers Beware CD. This book, with its pictures and well researched references, convinced me that we have much to learn about ourselves from a study of history and a reflection on those who came before. Thank you David Brown. The Reverend John Hale (1702), may have said it first - but I think you've told it best.
  • Boraston
A Guide to the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692 by David C. Brown is one of the best, most educational books I've ever read. Published in 1984, this 132 non-fiction book really settles in on the true story of what happened during the Salen Witch Trials, which you'll come to find is more terrifying than what the media and wrapped up myths put it out to be. The book holds nothing back when it comes to everything you could ever want to know about the little details, even within only 132 pages. I deeply enjoyed the book because I've researched the Salem Witch Trials before, but nothing has ever been this clean and deep. It's educational and exciting. If you're even considering reading it, do it, becaause you won't regret it. It's a riveting story that is not only scary, but it really happened, which makes you all the more want to read further into it.
  • JOIN
It is not often that you can find a magical piece of literature that allows you to view the story as if you are getting a personal tour of the event. This wonderful creation is one of the best I have read on the historic Salem Witch Trials. As it may not be the most beautiful memory in our nations past, this books allows children, teens, people interested in the Salem Witch Trials an inside look on the experience that grabbed many people by their hearts, and in many cases those few years, by thier freedom and lives. I hope you will take the time, as I have, to read this wonderful piece, and add the new-found knowledge to some use!
David C Brown is an excellent story-teller, and he brings these people to life as individuals. This is a good telling of the Salem Witch Trials, which seems to be based on fact gleaned from research, not fictional re-creation.