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Driving over Lemons: An Optimist in Andalucia download ebook

by Chris Stewart

Driving over Lemons: An Optimist in Andalucia download ebook
ISBN:
0783892683
ISBN13:
978-0783892689
Author:
Chris Stewart
Publisher:
G K Hall & Co (November 1, 2000)
Language:
Pages:
327 pages
ePUB:
1934 kb
Fb2:
1159 kb
Other formats:
rtf docx doc txt
Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

Chris Stewart has led a life many of us only dream o. But there must have been some fairy dust sprinkled over those schoolboys from Charterhouse School long ago, because "Driving Over Lemons" is a thoroughly well written and enjoyable narrative.

Chris Stewart has led a life many of us only dream of. As a teenager attending one of the most prestigious boarding schools in England, he played drums in the very first incarnation of the English rock band Genesis (Phil Collins was the fourth drummer). One imagines Peter Gabriel being attracted to Stewart's optimism more than his drumming ability. It deals with Stewart's pie-eyed zest for simple, earthy living, and his follies and foibles trying to make a go of farming in a foreign country.

Driving Over Lemons book. Start by marking Driving Over Lemons: An Optimist in Andalucía as Want to Read

Driving Over Lemons book. Start by marking Driving Over Lemons: An Optimist in Andalucía as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

And certainly Stewart, the eternal optimist .

And certainly Stewart, the eternal optimist, would never have written this delectable book and made us his utterly captivated audience.

Driving Over Lemons: An Optimist in Andalucia. Driving Over Lemons - Chris Stewart. I couldn’t help but feel that I had somewhat overstepped the mark. There comes a tide in the affairs of men, of cours. ut would Ana see it in quite that light?

Stewart, Chris, 1950-.

Stewart, Chris, 1950-. Stewart, Chris, Country life. New York : Pantheon Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on November 12, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Our relationship was already exhibiting signs of the primeval conflict between pastoralists and agriculturalists

Our relationship was already exhibiting signs of the primeval conflict between pastoralists and agriculturalists. tended walkways, a wilderness garden deep in wild flowers, with daffodils and cyclamen nodding on the grassy banks of the acequia. I discussed the sheep idea with Domingo.

He is now known for his autobiographical books, Driving Over Lemons: An Optimist in Andalucia (1999 .

He is now known for his autobiographical books, Driving Over Lemons: An Optimist in Andalucia (1999, ISBN 535227-) and the sequels, A Parrot In The Pepper Tree. ISBN 535227-5-X) and The Almond Blossom Appreciation Society (2006, ISBN 548995-0-4), about his life farming in Spain. Chris Stewart's blog about thrifty-living in Spain.

Chris Stewart shot to fame with Driving Over Lemons (9780956003805) - Sort Of Books' launch title in 1999. Funny, insightful and real, the book told the story of how he bought a peasant farm on the wrong side of the river, with its previous owner still resident. It became an international bestseller and with its sequels - A Parrot in the Pepper Tree and The Almond Blossom Appreciation Society - it has sold more than a million copies in the UK alone.

Meet Chris Stewart, the eternal optimist. Driving Over Lemons has sold over a million copies since publication in 1999. At age 17 Chris retired as the drummer of Genesis and launched a career as a sheep shearer and travel writer. He has no regrets about this. Had he become a big-time rock star he might never have moved with his wife Ana to a remote mountain farm in Andalucia.

Driving Over Lemons" is a book book that makes running a peasant farm in Spain seem like a distinctly good move. Meet Chris Stewart, the eternal optimist. He has regrets about this. Fate does sometimes seem to kw what it's up to.

At 17, the author retired from his schoolboy band, Genesis, and became a sheep shearer and travel writer. He moved with his wife to a remote mountain farm in the Alpujarras, south of Granada, and writes about his life on a mountain with no access road, water supply or electricity.
Reviews:
  • Lucam
Highly readable and absorbing account of life in (very) rural Andalucia. Have to really admire this guy and his wife. It will make you wonder about the choices in your own life (after 30+ years in front of a computer) yet this was no easy road for their family and you get the feeling he understates the difficulties they encountered. A wonderful read about a place and life I will never know, but hey that's what books are for, right? I would love to visit the Sierra Nevada of Spain though!
  • Fordrekelv
I went through a period of reading books about Americans and Brits relocating to various parts of the world, but stopped reading these as most tended to romanticize the genre. When this book caught my eye, I decided to give it a shot and read it in three days (usually it takes me weeks!). In fact I'm already well into the sequel.

Chris is a good writer but he doesn't try to shield his readers from some of the less desirable aspects of farm life and relocating. Slaughtering pigs and sheep getting attacked by dogs are all in here, but even as a staunch animal lover, I did not find this in any way detracted from my immense enjoyment of the book.

I would thoroughly recommend reading this book if you have a sense of true adventure or if like me you have this, but are unlikely to act upon it.

I would also add that my wife just started reading this book and she has yet to put it down.
  • Dagdage
Witty, self-deprecating, insightful. This is more than the formulaic move-to-a-foreign-country-rebuild-a-farmhouse-and-deal-with-wacky-local-tradesmen book. It contains a bracing dose of humor, of course (ever contemplated taking a shower in a shower stall shared by a dead goat?) but also poignant glimpses of farm life as it is lived in the Spanish hinterlands. Gritty...hard-scrabble...rustic. Also lyrical, contemplative and compassionate. I would recount passages to my wife as I was reading the book, and a day or two later, she would ask me "So what happens next with that English couple that moved to the farm in Spain?" The fact that my wife wanted to know "what happens next?" is a compliment to the book: like a delicious meal, it's nourishing by itself...but even more enjoyable when shared with someone you love.
  • Moralsa
I really enjoyed this personal chronicle of a couple (and daughter) who committed to farm life in Andalucia on its own terms. Lots of laughs and insights and beautiful descriptions of the mountains and terrain, including the challenges of surviving in this area a ways from Granada. I picked it up because of plans to visit the region, and it drew me in to the warmth and humanity of everyone Chris encountered, including the other ex-pats. Full of practical life issues, humor, and reflective commentary.
  • Eng.Men
I thoroughly enjoyed the author's perspective, and the humor with which the stories are told. Anyone who has lived on a farm, will enjoy the earnest revelations and sheer hard work required to earn a living. I hope that people who have read this book will be prepared to pay that small premium for organically produced goods with a smile, whether meat or vegetables!
  • Kabei
Chris Stewart has led a life many of us only dream of. As a teenager attending one of the most prestigious boarding schools in England, he played drums in the very first incarnation of the English rock band Genesis (Phil Collins was the fourth drummer). One imagines Peter Gabriel being attracted to Stewart's optimism more than his drumming ability. Unlike drummer Pete Best of the Beatles, however, Stewart quit the band rather than waiting to get fired. He went on to become a sailor, sheep shearer, travel writer, marry an attractive (and understanding) woman, and father a beautiful girl. And now pen a bestselling book on rural life in southern Spain.

I was cautious upon purchasing this book, as I couldn't imagine yet another member of Genesis achieving artistic and commercial success. But there must have been some fairy dust sprinkled over those schoolboys from Charterhouse School long ago, because "Driving Over Lemons" is a thoroughly well written and enjoyable narrative. It deals with Stewart's pie-eyed zest for simple, earthy living, and his follies and foibles trying to make a go of farming in a foreign country. Stewart succeeds with this book because we can relate to his naivety, and the humor in his narrative is natural and understated. He writes with ease and affection about his Spanish neighbors, fellow expatriates, cats Brenda and Elfine, building bridges, and channeling irrigation ditches.

If you can't chuck it all for the agrarian life in rural Spain, like Chris, at least pick a sunny day, find a cozy hammock, and read his book. It's as close as most of us will ever get to being there.
  • BeatHoWin
Lovely story about a couple who leave their comfortable life in the UK to renovate and run a farm in a remote area of Spain. The change is pretty drastic and they really do start with nothing facing a huge amount of work but this story is told with humour which lightens the tone. The story is beautifully told and I found myself getting to know the local characters and being lulled by the lifestyle. It's easy to understand why Nick and Ana took on this huge undertaking because by the end of the book the reader almost loves the farm and the area as much as they do. A story about following a dream and how all the hard work makes it worthwhile.