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Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization download ebook

by Norman Dietz,Nicholson Baker

Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization download ebook
ISBN:
1400137896
ISBN13:
978-1400137893
Author:
Norman Dietz,Nicholson Baker
Publisher:
Tantor Audio; Library - Unabridged CD edition (August 4, 2008)
Language:
ePUB:
1557 kb
Fb2:
1301 kb
Other formats:
rtf txt doc lrf
Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

In Human Smoke, Nicholson Baker turns his unrivaled literary talents to pacifism. It takes you from the beginning to the end in news stories and letters and personal notes written by the leaders who were there in the middle of it. It is a condemnation of the human experience.

In Human Smoke, Nicholson Baker turns his unrivaled literary talents to pacifism. His portraits of Churchill's imperial arrogance, Franklin Roosevelt's anti-Semitism, the machinations of the arms merchants, the Germans' death wish, and the efforts of pacifists are unforgettable. Baker's book is truly original. It shows what idiots run the world and how misguided and frail and lame and stupid and ignorant they really are. They are just people!

Human Smoke delivers a closely textured, deeply moving indictment of the .

Human Smoke delivers a closely textured, deeply moving indictment of the treasured myths that have romanticized much of the 1930s and '40s. This book starts in 1892, with explosions manufacturer Alfred Nobel's observation that his factories might "put an end to war" by making it too horrible to wage, and ends on December 31, 1941, with.

Bestselling author Nicholson Baker, recognized as one of the most dexterous and talented writers in America today, has created a compelling work of nonfiction . The war's victims felt as if they'd come to the end of civilization

Bestselling author Nicholson Baker, recognized as one of the most dexterous and talented writers in America today, has created a compelling work of nonfiction bound to provoke discussion and controversy - a wide-ranging, astonishingly fresh perspective on the political and social landscape that gave rise to World War II. Human Smoke delivers a closely textured, deeply moving indictment of the treasured myths that have romanticized much of the 1930s and '40s. The war's victims felt as if they'd come to the end of civilization. But then we also say that because it turned out so badly, it was the one just, necessary war.

Human Smoke is an unusual book even for Nicholson Baker, whose career has unspooled in a way as unpredictable as. .He had intended to write a book about the Library of Congress during World War II, Mr. Baker said, but then realized he didn’t understand the war itself - it made no sense.

Human Smoke is an unusual book even for Nicholson Baker, whose career has unspooled in a way as unpredictable as one of his fastidiously meandering sentences. So he began reading the newspapers of the 1930s and early ’40s, just as someone living through those events would have, and the papers in turn led him to books, and to contemporary letters and diaries especially. The papers gave me a sense of what it must have been like for people back then, he said.

Baker's last entry in the book is December 31, 1941, when the bombing campaign had yet to reach the savagery of the Hamburg and . Further, once war broke out, was it not imperative to end the war as soon as possible? Churchill rejected all efforts to reach a settlement.

Baker's last entry in the book is December 31, 1941, when the bombing campaign had yet to reach the savagery of the Hamburg and Dresden raids; but the essence of the policy was already in place. Churchill was far from the only advocate of mass bombing: the policy unfortunately had wide popular appeal  .

Imagine a history of World War II that dispensed with all the mythical afterglow and self-congratulatory propaganda and instead relied on contemporaneous newspaper articles and documents to build a fine-grained portrait of leaders and events. It's an attempt at objectivity, to be sure, but Baker isn't really interested in being "objective" because no one ever can be.

Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization is a 2008 book by Nicholson Baker about World War II. It questions the commonly held belief that the Allies wanted to avoid the war at all costs but were forced into action by Adolf. It questions the commonly held belief that the Allies wanted to avoid the war at all costs but were forced into action by Adolf Hitler's aggression.

Home Audio Books History World History Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World . This Author: Nicholson Baker. This Narrator: Norman Dietz.

Home Audio Books History World History Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization. This Publisher: Tantor Audio.

Although the book is replete with historical anecdotes and is readable, as history it is unsuccessful.

Nicholson Baker: I like the beginnings of things. It’s been a little confusing, actually, over the years, but also reassuring to discover that a book in the end finds its particular sub-group of readers, regardless of whether or not it was universally shunned at the time. The beginnings of a story, of a poem; I like that moment when the white space on the page gives way to actual type. The early paragraphs of a book have a kind of joyful feeling of setting out, like the sunny moment of merging into morning traffic from the onramp of a highway. I always think when I’m starting a new project, I want to do everything in this book; I want it to cover every single thing.

Human Smoke delivers a closely textured, deeply moving indictment of the treasured myths that have romanticized much of the 1930s and '40s. Incorporating meticulous research and well-documented sources-including newspaper and magazine articles, radio speeches, memoirs, and diaries-the book juxtaposes hundreds of interrelated moments of decision, brutality, suffering, and mercy. Vivid glimpses of political leaders and their dissenters illuminate and examine the gradual, horrifying advance toward overt global war and Holocaust.Praised by critics and readers alike for his exquisitely observant eye and deft, inimitable prose, Baker has assembled a narrative within Human Smoke that unfolds gracefully, tragically, and persuasively. This is an unforgettable book that makes a profound impact on our perceptions of historical events and mourns the unthinkable loss humanity has borne at its own hand.
Reviews:
  • Bloodray
This week I heard historian Thaddeus Russell tell a 19-year-old drop out who does not read books that "Human Smoke" is one he must get and read. So I did and I am a 75-year-old who only knew the history the main stream tells us up until 5 years ago when I heard Stephen Zarlenga author of “The Lost Science of Money” speak at an Occupy Chicago Economics Teach-In.

“Human Smoke” starts right out destroying our pre-conceptions of FDR, Churchill and Elinore Roosevelt. Thaddeus Russell has fact checked “Human Smoke” and finds it right on point accurate and will be retelling what is in “Human Smoke” and his own discoveries in his fourth coming book on WWII.

We need to destroy the tales we have been and are being told by our academies. “Human Smoke” is a great place to start.
  • Alianyau
Okay. This is NOT your usual history book. The writer makes very few comments. It is a collection, albeit a very select collection, of news stories with short time line narratives. It is very well done, in fact. It is all about WWII and the prelude to it and the final days. It takes you from the beginning to the end in news stories and letters and personal notes written by the leaders who were there in the middle of it. It is a condemnation of the human experience. It shows what idiots run the world and how misguided and frail and lame and stupid and ignorant they really are. They are just people! They are just like everyone else who ever lived.

The reason I liked it...it is real, and raw. It exposes the truth.

The reason I did not like it...it is like a mirror being held up to my face. I know I could never have done one bit better than those famous and infamous people who managed to get 45 million people murdered through their utter incompetence! That thought really upsets me.
  • DART-SKRIMER
It took me a little while to get used to the fact that the book was a sort of chronological "listing" of events leading up to the US entering the war, but once I realized the profound truth of the myriad events, mistakes, and misunderstandings, I was amazed and fascinated. I think this is a must for history buffs. PS. I don't mean that it is LITERALLY a list...each entry contains a complete narrative explanation of the event.
  • Brariel
Extremely well written, this book is an eye opener for anyone who might wonder what people around the world actually knew, while the atrocities of WWII Germany were actually happening. This page turner is a shocking book that I'll never forget... an important read.
  • uspeh
The cubist approach to history
with one overwhelming point,
easy to read, impossible not to see...
let this book put you on the way
and you will be a pacifist/peace activist forever...
  • Negal
Fascinating study on the history leading up to ww2. The content of this volume is presented to the reader as headlines. I have never seen a history presented in this manner. Excellent reading . Thought provoking and vividly gives the reader the thoughts of the people reporting the events leading up to the war
  • Akir
An amazing piece of research. And writing. I thought that I knew about how and why WWII began. It turned out that I had no idea about the machinations that went on, especially in the U.S. and in Britain.
Baker makes you look at the Second World War from a different perspective. Churchill is not the hero mainstream historians tell you he was but rather a cantankerous, meddling, ultra conservative know-it-all who thought he was the consummate military tactician. His decisions to fight in Africa and the "soft underbelly" of Europe, Italy, were major mistakes. Anti-semitism was not just rampant in Germany, but world wide.