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Abraham Lincoln's Lost Speech download ebook

by Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln's Lost Speech download ebook
ISBN:
1417906979
ISBN13:
978-1417906970
Author:
Abraham Lincoln
Publisher:
Kessinger Publishing, LLC (December 1, 2004)
Language:
Pages:
60 pages
ePUB:
1424 kb
Fb2:
1306 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit txt mobi
Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Lincoln's "Lost Speech" was a speech given by Abraham Lincoln at the Bloomington Convention on May 29, 1856, in Bloomington, Illinois

Lincoln's "Lost Speech" was a speech given by Abraham Lincoln at the Bloomington Convention on May 29, 1856, in Bloomington, Illinois. Traditionally regarded as lost because it was so engaging that reporters neglected to take notes, the speech is believed to have been an impassioned condemnation of slavery. It is possible the text was deliberately "lost" owing to its controversial content.

Abraham Lincoln, who lived in Springfield for nearly 25 years, wrote the speech shortly after his . He entrusted the speech to his eldest son Robert, who temporarily lost the suitcase, causing a minor uproar until it was found.

Abraham Lincoln, who lived in Springfield for nearly 25 years, wrote the speech shortly after his election as America's sixteenth President. Before leaving town in January 1861, he sometimes eluded hordes of office seekers by taking refuge in his brother-in-law's store.

The Gettysburg Address. There are five known copies of the speech in Lincoln's handwriting, each with a slightly different text, and named for the people who first received them: Nicolay, Hay, Everett, Bancroft and Bliss. Gettysburg, Pennsylvania November 19, 1863. On June 1, 1865, Senator Charles Sumner referred to the most famous speech ever given by President Abraham Lincoln. Two copies apparently were written before delivering the speech, one of which probably was the reading copy.

Abraham Lincoln's Peoria speech was made in Peoria, Illinois on October 16, 1854. The speech, with its specific arguments against slavery, was an important step in Abraham Lincoln's political ascension. The 1854 Kansas–Nebraska Act, written to form the territories of Kansas and Nebraska, was designed by Stephen A. Douglas, then the chairman of the Senate Committee on Territories.

Abraham Lincoln (/ˈlɪŋkən/; February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th president of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the nation through the American Civil War, its bloodiest war and its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. He preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the .

Abraham Lincoln became the sixteenth US president during a very dark time in America's history. he borrowed some law books from John T. Stuart, some others among Lincoln's biographers have Abraham. Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln. 95 MB·340 Downloads·New!. Abraham Lincoln, the lawyer-statesman. 09 MB·1,077 Downloads. The real Lincoln : a new look at Abraham Lincoln, his agenda, and an unnecessary war. 298 Pages·2009·1

Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Republican Club of the City of New York; Whitney, Henry Clay, 1831-1905.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Republican Club of the City of New York; Whitney, Henry Clay, 1831-1905. New York, Printed for the committee.

They record Lincoln?s campaigns for public office; the evolution of his stand against slavery; his electrifying debates with .

They record Lincoln?s campaigns for public office; the evolution of his stand against slavery; his electrifying debates with Stephen Douglas; his conduct of the Civil War; and the great public utterances of his presidency, including the Emancipation Proclamation and the Gettysburg Address. The contents of this Paperback Classic are drawn from Abraham Lincoln: Speeches and Writings 1832- 1858 and Abraham Lincoln: Speeches and Writings 1859-1865, volumes number 45 and 46 in the Library of America series. They are joined in the series by a companion volume, number 192s, The Lincoln Anthology: Great Writers on his Life and Legacy from 1860 to Now.

Abraham Lincoln, a self-taught lawyer, legislator and vocal opponent of slavery, was elected 16th . Lincoln then squared off against Douglas in a series of famous debates; though he lost the Senate election, Lincoln’s performance made his reputation nationally.

Abraham Lincoln, a self-taught lawyer, legislator and vocal opponent of slavery, was elected 16th president of the United States in November 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the Civil War. He led the nation through the bloody conflict and declared all slaves free under the Emancipation Proclamation. His profile rose even higher in early 1860, after he delivered another rousing speech at New York City’s Cooper Union.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Reviews:
  • Matty
I was unaware that there were any versions of the speech extant until I came across one in Abraham Lincoln: Life, speech and letters, published by Wordsworth in 2009. The contemporaneous account was rendered by a young lawyer, Henry Clay Whitney, who published it in McClure's Magazine in 1896. Paul Angle and others have discounted this version, but Medill of the Chicago Tribune and others who were present endorsed it. What to make of this controversy? I would say that historians who edit collections of speeches would be conservative about including dubious texts. In this case, Whitney's was the only account, and became public only many years later. However, it was contemporaneous, and so did not depend on Whitney's recollection (unlike the recollections of witnesses). Despite not being a stenographer, Whitney seems to have produced a very detailed, coherent, and logical account. I doubt that he made it up; why would he and how would he? The arguments and language seem consistent with those Lincoln produced on other occasions. Might Whitney have embellished Lincoln's words? That would have required the skills of an orator who surpassed Lincoln--good luck with that. If Whitney had a political or personal motive to distort Lincoln's message, why wait 40 years to do so? Accounts of other Lincoln speeches, including the Gettysburg Address, appeared in slightly different versions; how can we be sure that, even when Lincoln subsequently supplied the text, he spoke precisely those words? I doubt that many reporters were trained stenographers. So I say, examine the speech for yourself. I think you will agree with me that it is powerful, well reasoned, and eloquent. It is easy to see how the audience was spellbound.
  • Slowly writer
It should be noted that most authorities on Lincoln (please see both the Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln by Roy P. Basler, et. al. and the Recollected Words of Abraham Lincoln by Fehrenbacher and Fehrenbacher) question the veracity of Whitney's recollection of Lincoln's Lost Speech, which is why Whitney's text is not included in either source. Interested individuals are always welcome to read the book, but they should be aware that Whitney's credibility as a source is in doubt.