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Adios to the Brushlands (Wardlaw Books) download ebook

by Arturo Longoria

Adios to the Brushlands (Wardlaw Books) download ebook
ISBN:
0890967695
ISBN13:
978-0890967690
Author:
Arturo Longoria
Publisher:
Texas A&M University Press; 1st edition (September 1, 1997)
Language:
Pages:
144 pages
ePUB:
1432 kb
Fb2:
1468 kb
Other formats:
lrf azw mbr lrf
Category:
Americas
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

Nature is a really beautiful thing when seen first hand.

Nature is a really beautiful thing when seen first hand.

In Adios to the Brushlands native son Arturo Longoria remembers this chapparal land of his childhood: hot summer days and frigid winter mornings walking with his grandfather or his best friend through the dense underbrush, watching birds, studying reptiles, identifying plants. Boyhood hunting and varmint calling, encounters with rattlesnakes and fierce pamorana ants, hours spent with his grandfather, Papagrande, and cousins bring to life another time and place

In Adios to the Brushlands native son Arturo Longoria remembers this chapparal land of his childhood: hot summer days and frigid . This book tells you how the brushlands of south Texas used to be, but there is still hope of saving it for future generations

In Adios to the Brushlands native son Arturo Longoria remembers this chapparal land of his childhood: hot summer days and frigid winter mornings walking with his grandfather or his best friend through the dense underbrush, watching birds, studying reptiles,. This book tells you how the brushlands of south Texas used to be, but there is still hope of saving it for future generations. The author tells his story in such a beautiful way that the reader can actually see the brushlands.

Adios to the Brushlands.

Janna Graber,e-AudioProductions.

Books and Literature Poetry Celebrity Births Deaths and Ages Children's Books All .

Books and Literature Poetry Celebrity Births Deaths and Ages Children's Books All Topics. Authors, Poets, and Playwrights. What has the author Arturo Longoria written? Arturo Longoria has written: 'Keepers of the Wilderness (Environmental History Series, No. 15)'.

Some essential books that you owe it to yourself to read once in your lifetime. Some childhood favourites and some with very adult themes. 1,177 users · 6,028 views. made by Renos Georgiou. avg. score: 14 of 50 (29%).

Arturo Barrios Flores (born December 12, 1962 in Mexico City) is a Mexican long-distance runner who set the 10,000 m world record in 1989, the one hour world record in 1991, and the 2. .

Arturo Barrios Flores (born December 12, 1962 in Mexico City) is a Mexican long-distance runner who set the 10,000 m world record in 1989, the one hour world record in 1991, and the 20,000 m world record en route to the one hour run world record. Barrios finished in fifth place in the 10,000 metres at the 1988 Summer Olympics. He is a former world record holder at the 10,000 m (27:08. 23, set on August 18, 1989 at the Internationales Stadionfest (ISTAF) in Berlin, Germany)

Adios to the brushlands. 1st ed. by Arturo Longoria. Includes bibliographical references (p. -118). Published 1997 by Texas A&M University Press in College Station, Tex. Shrubland ecology, Internet Archive Wishlist, Nature conservation.

Books by arturo longoria. Adios to the Brushlands (eBook). by arturo longoria (Author). Released: September 9, 2016.

In a little-known area of South Texas, extending across the Rio Grande into Mexico, a mysterious, lush land once harbored mighty trees, bushes, and grasses--brushland home to a plethora of wildlife. In Adios to the Brushlands native son Arturo Longoria remembers this chapparal land of his childhood: hot summer days and frigid winter mornings walking with his grandfather or his best friend through the dense underbrush, watching birds, studying reptiles, identifying plants. Boyhood hunting and varmint calling, encounters with rattlesnakes and fierce pamorana ants, hours spent with his grandfather, Papagrande, and cousins bring to life another time and place. A trained biologist and one-time investigative reporter, Longoria brings his skills of observation and expression to sing the song of this vanishing habitat that once covered nearly four million acres of the Rio Grande Valley. In moving but understated prose he captures the wonder of the brushland and symbolically and emotionally links its loss, through rootplows and bulldozers, to the death of his grandfather, who had introduced him to that world. He reports as well the public policies and private actions that have reduced the brushland to less than five percent of its former extent. He chronicles the efforts to publicize the brushland’s destruction and to save the remaining richness for future generations. At once a celebration of a region’s nature and a call to preserve the little bit of it still left today, this book is to the South Texas Brushlands what Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring was to the nation’s wetlands or John Graves’s Goodbye to a River was to the Brazos River. Rife with the natural history of an endangered ecology and capturing as well the binational culture of the region, Adios to the Brushlands draws readers into a land as raw, beautiful, and complex as life itself. A unique descriptive documentary of a disappearing natural treasure, it is a slice of the new natural history that weds the details of the physical world with their significance to the human heart.
Reviews:
  • Tejora
This is a nostalgic, doleful account—a story at times uplifting and at other times depressing. Only someone familiar with the ancient wildlands can identify with the pathos that this loss of habitat represents. I have experienced firsthand the narrative that Mr. Longoria describes. It brings to mind the poignant feeling of loss elicited in another book, in another context, from another author: “The Earth is dying, dying. Soon it will be dead…Go home, the party’s over. It’s late, it’s late, so late…” This Immortal, Roger Zelazny, p. 111.

Are we forever doomed to mourn what we have destroyed?
  • Vikus
Really good book. Nature is a really beautiful thing when seen first hand. The author, Arturo Longoria, shares his experience in the RGV's brushlands and the joy it has brought him. The dilemma is that people in today's culture are not experiencing what nature has to offer because it is being destroyed, so how can they protect it? Great book!
  • JOGETIME
Live in South Texas? You need to read this immediately.
  • Shezokha
Finally got around to reading this book on S. Texas. It is OK but given how thin it is and how dated the content is, did not feel it was worth the sales price. It was different than expected. still it did insight to the greed and how landowners in that region cleaned up at tax payers expense back in the nineties...Lots of changes down there since this was published. Buy it used if you can, better yet see if your library has it.
  • Gozragore
I got this book because a co-worker read it and it sounded interesting. I have not read the book yet, but plan to in the near future.
  • Yndanol
My cousin is the author of this eloquent book. He even wrote me into the story. Aside from all of that, Arturo has seen the destruction of the Texas and especially South Texas brushland as bit by bit of it has been rootplowed to make farmland and now Colonias and subdivisions. As young adults we watched the brush piles lit and the sky look like the fires of hell as wildlife habitat was destoyed. If anyone could write this book with the soul of one who mourns destruction, it is Arturo--he lived it.