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Prenatal Yoga and Natural Childbirth, Third Edition download ebook

by Jeannine Parvati Baker

Prenatal Yoga and Natural Childbirth, Third Edition download ebook
ISBN:
1556433824
ISBN13:
978-1556433825
Author:
Jeannine Parvati Baker
Publisher:
North Atlantic Books; 2 edition (November 1, 2001)
Language:
Pages:
130 pages
ePUB:
1885 kb
Fb2:
1686 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt mobi docx
Category:
Exercise & Fitness
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

The yoga is adapted perfectly to pregnancy and was in fact the first prenatal yoga book written in our modern age . Hi there, I am expecting my third child and am planning an unassisted home-birth.

12 people found this helpful. I had my first two in the hospital, first was a medicated experience, the second was natural, although I was fighting the whole time with the doctor and nurses to keep it that way. So now my husband and I plan to have this one at home where we will not have to fight the control-freaks off.

Jeannine Parvati (June 1, 1949 – December 1, 2005) was an anti-circumcision activist, yoga teacher, midwife and author. Parvati's first book, Prenatal Yoga & Natural Childbirth, was influenced by ashtanga yogi Baba Hari Dass

Jeannine Parvati (June 1, 1949 – December 1, 2005) was an anti-circumcision activist, yoga teacher, midwife and author. Parvati's first book, Prenatal Yoga & Natural Childbirth, was influenced by ashtanga yogi Baba Hari Dass. Her second, Hygieia: A Woman's Herbal was her master's thesis in psychology at San Francisco State University. Later she co-authored, with her second husband and under the last name Parvati-Baker, Conscious Conception: Elemental Journey through the Labyrinth of Sexuality.

Prenatal Yoga & Natural Childbirth book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Prenatal Yoga & Natural Childbirth as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

The section on Prenatal Yoga is unchanged and retains its power as an aid to those preparing for childbirth, their advisors, and their helpers.

The additional pages include the stories of the births of Jeannine's sixth child, Halley Sophia, and her first grandchild, Wynn to first-born daughter, Loi, as well as Jeannine's reflections on becoming a Grand Mother, and an extensive biography of the author. The section on Prenatal Yoga is unchanged and retains its power as an aid to those preparing for childbirth, their advisors, and their helpers. This work is a beautiful testimonial to the living of one's truth and vision.

Parvati first book, Prenatal Yoga & Natural Childbirth, was the first text in the Western world on the subject, written .

Parvati first book, Prenatal Yoga & Natural Childbirth, was the first text in the Western world on the subject, written during her studies with ashtanga yogi Baba Hari Dass from whom she received the name Parvati. In the Hindu myth, Parvati is the female counterpart of the male principle, Shiva. Jeannine Parvati's contribution to the realm of prenatal yoga was groundbreaking, and in the following years, other authors such as yogini Geeta Iyengar and Janet Balaskas expanded the Prenatal Yoga realm with texts which further asserted benefits of yoga for healthy pregnancy and childbirth preparation, eventually resulting in one of the most popularized trends for modern women.

The book Prenatal Yoga & Natural Childbirth, guided me through all five pregnancies. I have lost this book so many times. Loaned it out, given it away.

I felt the stork had dropped a bundle on my doorstep. First - the cover is delicious. Inside I found everything I always loved about prenatal yoga. The book Prenatal Yoga & Natural Childbirth, guided me through all five pregnancies.

Prenatal yoga & natural birth. Baker, Jeannine Parvati, 1949-. Prenatal care, Hatha yoga, Natural childbirth. North Atlantic Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. New ed. External-identifier. urn:acs6:ke:epub:dca-f8f9747e6b88 urn:acs6:ke:pdf:cb6-9f5bba55dd3a.

Shipping to Russian Federation. Prenatal Yoga Complete (DVD, 2005).

Book by Baker, Jeannine Parvati
Reviews:
  • Welen
I will hold this book dear for years to come. It is a book from a different era, that is to be sure. Its survival in a sea of newer and digitally supported media for prenatal yoga is a testament to its quality. It truly shocked me during my first read (it is very much a guide to living and birthing naturally and Parvati-Baker leads by example) but as I familiarized myself with Parvati-Baker and her family I grew to appreciate and understand the material without bias.

As a guide to the excersize of yoga itself, it is very helpful. With photograph demonstrations, instructions and the author's personal commentary on each pose, the reader can follow along easily. As motivation and support for natural childbirth, it is equally effective. She gave me the strength I needed to prepare for natural childbirth, and she reminds readers that birthing is a natural bodily function like any other, and that we are fully equipped to handle it ourselves.

The guide is sprinkled with poems and anecdotes from Parvati-Baker that are spiritual and touching.

This reader highly recommends this book as a guide and a companion through pregnancy and childbirth.
  • Hanad
This book is not one to read if you feel talked down to by women who are ardent proponents of delivering babies unmedicated and in a home setting (just know what you are getting before ordering, and you will likely be pleased). I, on the other hand, am not one of those women and appreciated it immensely for its reassuring tone that (low risk) birthing is one of the most natural things a woman's body can do.
The tone is quite "new-agey" however it is the first book that brought tears to my eyes because of its willingness to acknowledge the more spiritual side of the pregnancy and birthing experience for women and even men. I stopped reading a lot of my other pregnancy books around month 5 due to being fed up with their alarmist focuses on "what can go wrong" rather than relating uplifting and empowering stories of birthing that would empower a woman toward a great birthing experience.
This is a refreshing read that evens out some of the other books you'll read. I wouldn't recommend it if you are definitely planning on hospital birthing with pain medications, but if you would prefer natural birthing or even are open to the possibility, this book may be what you need.
  • Scoreboard Bleeding
This is a beautiful book on preparing for childbirth. But its a little too new age for me to really get into. Nicely put together, and great if you're into horoscopes and chakras. I don't put a lot of weight on those things so I didn't enjoy it as much as some. I feel silly focusing my life force. I might be too old and cynical for this book.
  • Anayanis
One of the most significant things to me about this guide to Yoga in pregnancy, is the incredible birth stories. Jeannine,the Author, offers the reader her experiences of birth, and they sure are inspiring! Pregnant women love to read about other women's births, its the way we learn best, telling each other our stories. The yoga is adapted perfectly to pregnancy and was in fact the first prenatal yoga book written in our modern age!Its a great book for pregnant women looking to really connect with the magic of pregnancy, I thoroughly recommend it.
  • Zinnthi
i found the book to be full of good spiritual reading. It is inspiring of natural childbirth as much as it is on being intune with our sensual female selves of lover and mother.
  • Lli
Hi there, I am expecting my third child and am planning an unassisted home-birth. I had my first two in the hospital, first was a medicated experience, the second was natural, although I was fighting the whole time with the doctor and nurses to keep it that way. So now my husband and I plan to have this one at home where we will not have to fight the control-freaks off.

Here is what I liked about this book:
I enjoyed the focus of birth being natural, and not something to be paranoid about.
I enjoyed Jeannine's confidence in herself in birthing her own children naturally.
I enjoyed the yoga poses and the author's personal commentary on them very much. I plan to record what she said, and do the poses with those words out loud to help me to better stay on track while doing them.
I enjoy, as I always do, reading natural birth stories.

Here is what I did not like about this book:
Hmm, how do I say this briefly. She gets weird! I don't know what the heck religion she is. She said a prayer while having sex with the purpose of conception (weird!) calling out at what seemed several different religions all together. She ended it with Jesus Christ, she said she is Jewish, she gets really into astrology, she touches on reincarnation... and then just some other stuff that is over my head.
She just gets weird, and I don't agree with all of her logic.

In the end, I still respect her, and admire her for birthing naturally, especially with her first few kids when it was even more controversial, however her spiritual side just is a little too much for me as she progresses.
  • Hatе&love
Not for everyone. Some parts were interesting when they focused on the exercises. Other sections of the book were more just personal stories and anecdotes that won't apply to all.