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This Same Sky: A Collection of Poems from Around the World download ebook

by Naomi Shihab Nye

This Same Sky: A Collection of Poems from Around the World download ebook
ISBN:
0027684407
ISBN13:
978-0027684407
Author:
Naomi Shihab Nye
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers; First Edition edition (October 31, 1992)
Language:
Pages:
208 pages
ePUB:
1184 kb
Fb2:
1622 kb
Other formats:
mobi docx azw rtf
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

Find sources: "Naomi Shihab Nye" – news · newspapers · books · scholar .

Find sources: "Naomi Shihab Nye" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (October 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). Naomi Shihab Nye is a poet and songwriter born in 1952 to a Palestinian father and American mother. She grew up in St. Louis, Missouri, Jerusalem, and San Antonio, Texas. However, San Antonio is where she considers home, "San Antonio feels most like home as I have lived here the longest. One of the best-known is This Same Sky: A Collection of Poems from around the World, which contains translated work by 129 poets from 68 different countries.

This Same Sky can be enjoyed as a collection as a look at the human condition or singularly as individual, finely crafted poems. May 10, 2007 Casey rated it liked it.

Naomi Shihab Nye was born in St. Louis, Missouri.

A poetry anthology in which 129 poets from sixty-eight different countries celebrate the natural world and its human and animal inhabitants. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by abowser on April 7, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

This same sky. A Collection of Poems from around the World. Naomi shihab nye. Virginia Norey. This Same Sky: A Collection of Poems from Around the World, selected by Naomi Shihab Nye, contains poems from 129 poets in 68 different countries

This same sky. This Same Sky: A Collection of Poems from Around the World, selected by Naomi Shihab Nye, contains poems from 129 poets in 68 different countries. The collection’s table of contents is separated by topic: i. Words and Silences, Dreams and Dreamers, Families, This Earth and Sky In Which We Live, Losses, and Human Mysteries. From the beginning, the selection creates a reading atmosphere allowing the human connection to resonate. No matter what part of the world one lives, we experience strong similarities.

Naomi Shihab Nye has collected over one hundred poems from poets all over the world. All in all, This Same Sky is a good collection, and it does a very good job representing a broad cross-section of the world. The poems are about many things, including nature and families. 7 people found this helpful.

Her books of poems include Fuel, Red Suitcase, and Words Under the Words.

This Same Sky: A Collection of Poems from Around the World. In "Never in a Hurry the poet Naomi Shihab Nye" resists the American tendency to "leave toward places whenn we barely have time enough to get there. by Naomi Shihab Nye. 1996·. A poetry anthology in which 129 poets from 68 different countries celebrate the natural world and its human and animal inhabitants. Never in a Hurry: Essays on People and Places. by Naomi Shihab Nye · Beck Whitehead.

Naomi Shihab Nye - 1952- From Words Under the Words: Selected Poems by Naomi Shihab Ny. They sleep completely, waking refreshed. Others live in two worlds, the lost and remembered

Naomi Shihab Nye - 1952-. Skin remembers how long the years grow when skin is not touched, a gray tunnel of singleness, feather lost from the tail of a bird, swirling onto a step, swept away by someone who never saw it was a feather. Skin ate, walked, slept by itself, knew how to raise a see-you-later hand. From Words Under the Words: Selected Poems by Naomi Shihab Nye. Published by Far Corner. Reprinted with permission of the author. Others live in two worlds, the lost and remembered. They sleep twice, once for the one who is gone, once for themselves.

In eighty-two poems and paragraphs, Naomi Shihab Nye alights on the essentials of our time-our loved ones, our dense air, our wars, our memories, our planet-and leaves us feeling curiously sweeter and profoundly soothed. The day after Liyana got her first real kiss, her life changed forever. Not because of the kiss, but because it was the day her father announced that the family was moving from St. Louis all the way to Palestine. Though her father grew up there, Liyana knows very little about her family's Arab heritage.

A multicultural anthology of poems represents the poetic voices, observations, traditions, and stories of people from some sixty countries around the world.
Reviews:
  • Malaunitly
Naomi Shihab Nye has collected over one hundred poems from poets all over the world. The poems are about many things, including nature and families. While the details of the poetry (items, animals and birds) are foreign, the feelings expressed are familiar to us all.
Some of the poems are funny, like the one from Altazor by Vicente Huidobro, many others are sad ("My Life Story" by Lan Nguyen and "Behind Bars" by Fadwa Tuqan). Some poems are puzzling, like "Petrified Minute" by Zoltan Zelk and others make you want to know more of the story behind them, like Ruth Dallas's "A New Dress" and Gu Cheng's "A Headstrong Boy." There are poems that create beautiful mental images, and poems that leave the reader bewildered and vaguely disturbed (Tony Perez's "Volunteer Worker").
While the words have been translated into English, much of this poetry is difficult to understand. Many poems would be almost meaningless for a reader with no frame of reference to place the poem in. The poem "Jerusalem" by the Israeli poet Yehuda Amichai is one that a reader with little knowledge about the history of Palestine would find puzzling. The brief Notes on the Contributors at the back of the volume help explain a little more about the poets, but to truly understand some of the poetry more background information is needed. This collection is not one most children will fully understand on their own.
  • Anayalore
A beautiful, and varied, collection of poetry from around the globe. Well worth the purchase.
  • Androrim
Very nice and fast shipping.
  • Not-the-Same
Great international collection of poetry, my tween and I shared. Even the translated poems are done well and understandable.
  • Arthunter
Let me help you think in circles. I wasnt a fan. I dont know how to put it but i feel like the right person with an open mind could get down with this.
  • IWantYou
I don't have this program. No idea why it is showing up on my review listing. Why would this show up as an app when I never downloaded this app?
  • Legend 33
English is a simplistic language when compared to a great many other languages. It simply doesn't have the same potential for subtle nuances, rhyming, and other things of that nature. With that in mind, it's always hit-or-miss as to whether a translated poem will carry the same impact in English as it did in its original language. That, I would say, is one of the problems with this book, and it's not the book's, nor Naomi Shihab Nye's fault.

As the other reviewer said, some of the poems are quite good, some are obscure, and some are downright puzzling, and I imagine those particular ones, in their original language, had a lot more clarity of vision and feeling. The cultural backgrounds are a pitfall, as was also stated, though if a reader has a small knowledge of world history, the captions at the bottom of each poem which state the country of the author's origin are a great help. For example, when reading a poem about scrounging in the jungle, looking for a few scraps of rice, AK-47 in hand, it helps to know if the author is Vietnamese.

That notwithstanding, some of the poems are simply confusing, and I am an English major, and some, also due to the translation, I imagine, seem more like straight-forward prose.

All in all, This Same Sky is a good collection, and it does a very good job representing a broad cross-section of the world. It's just a shame the English language doesn't do the works justice. So, with that in mind, it's the translation's fault that I only gave the book 3 stars.