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The Boy Who Could Fly download ebook

by James Norcliffe

The Boy Who Could Fly download ebook
ISBN:
1606840843
ISBN13:
978-1606840849
Author:
James Norcliffe
Publisher:
EgmontUSA (July 13, 2010)
Language:
Pages:
320 pages
ePUB:
1924 kb
Fb2:
1663 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf mbr rtf
Category:
Growing Up & Facts of Life
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

James Norcliffe is both an award-winning poet and the author of five Young Adult novels. The loblolly boy can only interact with the rare humans who can see and hear him, as well as a mysterious sea captain who acts as a sort of mentor.

James Norcliffe is both an award-winning poet and the author of five Young Adult novels. He teaches at New Zealand's Lincoln University and lives in Church Bay with his wife and an ungrateful cat named Pinky Bones. His novel, The Assassin of Gleam, received an award for the best fantasy published in New Zealand in 2006. The reader never determines precisely who the captain is or how the loblolly boy's body and life exchange began, but despite the unexplained mythology, the book works beautifully.

Start by marking The Boy Who Could Fly as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Boy Who Could Fly as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This is a lovely A very fun, nicely done children's book about what happens to Michael, a boy in an orphanage where he wishes he was somewhere else: A mysterious boy, strangely dressed appears to him and tells him he is 'the Loblolly boy' also, he can fly. This would let Michael fly over the high walls of the orphanage and escape.

The Enchanted Flute by. James Norcliffe.

A strange creature called the loblolly boy convinces Michael that he can fly right over the wall. When he does, Michael discovers-to his initial joy and later dismay-that he has traded places with the loblolly boy. After some fantastical adventures, loblolly boy/Michael winds up finding his long-lost family. His sisters take turns becoming the loblolly boy, but they ultimately pass the role back to Michael so he can regain his identity and escape the orphanage to come and live with them

The Boy Who Could Fly is a 1986 American fantasy comedy-drama film written and directed by Nick Castle. It was produced by Lorimar Productions for 20th Century Fox, and released theatrically on August 15, 1986.

The Boy Who Could Fly is a 1986 American fantasy comedy-drama film written and directed by Nick Castle.

The Boy Who Could Fly. By James Norcliffe. And then he meets the loblolly boy, who is strange, mysterious and who promises the young boy that he can teach him how to fly - as he himself can, with his green, feathery wings. In teaching the boy how to fly, however, the loblolly boy has made an Exchange-he switches place with the orphan. Now the young boy is free and the loblolly boy is "real. The young boy rejoices in his freedom until he realizes the price he has paid and soon sets out to make his own Exchange - but at what cost?

The boy cannot trust Wicker. Fantasy, adventure and realism combine in a junior fiction novel by an award-winning writer.

A strange and mischievous story written with exceptional style, pace and grace - a true classic in the making. The Firefly is taken in the night by pirates who sail the Caribbean. The ship's boy and a handful of men are set adrift in a jolly-boat. The boy cannot trust Wicker. When David's uncle comes to visit he sets off a bizarre series of events.

The Boy Who Could Fly is a 1986 American comedy-drama film written & directed by Nick Castle, starring Lucy Deakins, Jay Underwood, Fred Savage, Bonnie Bedelia, Colleen Dewhurst and Fred Gwynne. It also starred Mindy Cohn (from the NBC sitcom "The Facts of Life"), Louise Fletcher and Jason Priestley (of "Beverly Hills, 90210" fame in his first film role). The movie was released on September 26, 1986 by 20th Century Fox and produced by Lorimar Productions.

Home Laura Ruby The Boy Who Could Fl. Sitting on the laps of people who can’t stand them. The Answer Hand pointed accusingly with its index finger before beginning again: Cats don’t like wet things.

Home Laura Ruby The Boy Who Could Fly. Home. The boy who could fly, . They don’t like stinky things. The cats, The Hand said, are very annoyed. The Professor glanced back and had to agree, though he would never say so. I thought you weren’t supposed to give any answers unless I asked you a specific question? You asked if cats were ever happy and I told you.

A young boy lives in an orphanage that is completely surrounded by a thick wall. Every day, he wishes he were free. He wishes he had a new life. And then he meets the loblolly boy, who is strange, mysterious and who promises the young boy that he can teach him how to fly - as he himself can, with his green, feathery wings.  In teaching the boy how to fly, however, the loblolly boy has made an Exchange--he switches place with the orphan. Now the young boy is free and the loblolly boy is "real." The young boy rejoices in his freedom until he realizes the price he has paid and soon sets out to make his own Exchange - but at what cost?
Reviews:
  • catterpillar
I found this book strangely enjoyable. Told from the perspective of the thoughtful and sympathetic protagonist, the reader experiences Michael's elation when he escapes his dire existence, then watches happiness turn to dejection as he discovers that his new life isn't all he imagined. Sure, it's fun to fly and to be invisible, but the loblolly boy is also utterly separate from humanity. Never hungry or thirsty, neither hot nor cold, nearly always alone, his is a terribly comfortless existence. The loblolly boy can only interact with the rare humans who can see and hear him, as well as a mysterious sea captain who acts as a sort of mentor.

The reader never determines precisely who the captain is or how the loblolly boy's body and life exchange began, but despite the unexplained mythology, the book works beautifully. The author, instead of focusing on the hows and whys of his fantasy world, explores a more universal theme, a young boy's path to emotional maturity.

When Michael becomes the loblolly boy, he is faced with a dilemma: he can seek salvation by tricking another child, just as he has been cheated of his body and existence, or he can choose a more honest, difficult and uncertain path.

Michael discovers that initial impressions can be terribly misleading, and that guaranteed anonymity may lead people to behave in ways they'd be ashamed to acknowledge in the public sphere. Most importantly, he gains perspective and realizes that although he rightly considered his previous life a terrible one, his circumstances could have been considerably worse. Through his experiences as a loblolly boy, he gains the compassion, wisdom, personal strength and emotional connections necessary to change the course of his life, and perhaps the lives of countless others.

The author manages to pack all of these life lessons into a compelling plot, so this exciting adventure never degenerates into a tedious sermon. Recommended!
  • funike
The Boy Who Could Fly is the story of Michael, a young man living a miserable existence in an orphanage, who is one day given a way out. He meets a young man who tells him that he can teach him to fly, and when Michael falls for the trick, he loses his humanity and becomes a loblolly boy. Michael soon finds out that this new existence is not all it's cracked up to be. Sure, flying is great, and who hasn't dreamed of being invisible? The problem is that he is now cut off from all humanity, and that isn't so great. Now his life at the orphanage doesn't look so bad. His journey from orphan to loblolly boy back to human again makes for a great read that is sure to engage anyone ages 11 to 15. We even get a pretty good villain thrown in the mix in the form of the collector, who wants to capture the loblolly boy to add to his butterfly collection.

The pacing here is spot on, and the characters are well formed. This title is from New Zealand, so you get a few "Bloody Hell's" scattered about, and other slang terms that add to the story's rather exotic appeal. This is a quick read and even though the beginning is very melancholy, I think kids will be motivated to stick with it just because the premise is so intriguing. When the story really gets cooking, there's enough body switching and chasing to make your head spin. Most kids will be left wondering what they would trade for the ability to fly and be invisible and if it would truly be worth it. A solid choice for fantasy loving tweeners and young teens. Recommended.
  • Eseve
Michael lives a miserable existence in the strict orphanage he calls home, until the day he meets the loblolly boy.

At first amused by the boy's insistence that he can fly, Michael is awed when he sees the boy's wings, and agrees to learn to fly, too. When, by magic, he and the loblolly boy switch places, he's only too happy to flee the orphanage and thrill in the freedom of flight.

But Michael soon discovers there are plenty of disadvantages to life as a loblolly boy. He can't feel cold or warmth, he can't eat, and only a few people can see and hear him, so for the most part he's completely alone.

With the help of an old sailer and his mysterious telescope, Michael finds a family with twin girls he feels a strange connection to. As he gets to know them, he starts to see there may be a way to fix everything, as long as he can stay out of the maniacal Collector's grasp in time to do it.

THE BOY WHO COULD FLY is a magical adventure. Readers will sympathize with Michael's plight both as a regular human and as a loblolly boy, and follow him eagerly through the twists and turns of his journey. Though mostly light with moments of humor, the book also manages to consider what it means to be human, and what is worth sacrificing to hold onto ones humanity, which will leave readers thinking after they've turned the last page.

Reviewed by: Lynn Crow
  • Clonanau
Brilliant! Awesome! Original! Those who dream of flying and know the delight and deliciousness of it may hesitate to pick up this book, afraid it may be mundane compared to their own sensations. But this story has less to do with flying, and more to do with finding oneself. This is a superb coming-of-age-story about a boy whose identity has literally been wiped out in a miserable home for orphaned children. There are helpers for the boy, both good and malevolent. Well, there's nothing beats a scary prod to set a boy on the path to manhood, eh? A few terms and manner of speech may thwart younger American readers, but ages twelve and up will enjoy a refreshing change of scene in this New Zealand-set novel. Don't miss reading this book of how an unfortunate forlorn boy reconnects with his family. Oh! I've given away too much already!
  • Gagas
Read this to my children 9 and 11. We all loved it! What a charming and original story! Beautifully written! Two Thumbs Up!!!
  • Uriel
When I first picked up this book many years ago, the title had already caught my attention. At first you feel bad for the kid because no one believes he can honestly fly. For a little while me neither. Then it happens. He proves everyone wrong, and he flies! Beautifully written. This story is still with me.