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Homegrown Whole Grains: Grow, Harvest, and Cook Wheat, Barley, Oats, Rice, Corn and More download ebook

by Sara Pitzer

Homegrown Whole Grains: Grow, Harvest, and Cook Wheat, Barley, Oats, Rice, Corn and More download ebook
ISBN:
160342153X
ISBN13:
978-1603421539
Author:
Sara Pitzer
Publisher:
Storey Publishing, LLC; Original edition (August 5, 2009)
Language:
Pages:
168 pages
ePUB:
1300 kb
Fb2:
1408 kb
Other formats:
txt lrf azw doc
Category:
Cooking by Ingredient
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Learn to grow, harvest, store, grind, and cook nine popular whole grains. Sara Pitzer is the author of Homegrown Whole Grains and more than a dozen cookbooks and travel guides.

Learn to grow, harvest, store, grind, and cook nine popular whole grains. Sara Pitzer provides complete instructions for growing your own wheat. She has studied and written about grains in Amish country in central Pennsylvania, in the southeastern United States, and in California. More recently, she has studied small-scale rice growing in Thailand and quinoa production in Peru. She lives in North Carolina.

Growing whole grains is simpler and more rewarding than most people imagine. With as little as 1000 square feet of land, backyard farmers can grow enough wheat to harvest 50 pounds in a single afternoon - and those 50 pounds can be baked into 50 loaves of fresh bread. Whether milled into nutritional flours or used in any of their unmilled states, wheat, barley, quinoa, and the other grain crops are healthful additions to every diet.

Homegrown Whole Grains book. Learn to grow, harvest, store, grind, and cook nine popular whole grains. Learn to grow, harvest, store, grind, and cook nine popular. Sara Pitzer provides complete instructions for growing your own wheat, corn, barley, millet, oats, rice, rye, spelt, and quinoa, as well as recipes for using these grains in tasty dishes. Cultivating these crops is surprisingly easy, and it takes less space than you might imagine - with just 1,000 Learn to grow, harvest, store, grind, and cook nine popular whole grains.

The Whole Grain Cookbook: Wheat, Barley, Oats, Rye, Amaranth, Spelt, Corn, Millet, Quinoa, and More. and wheat berries to the forefront of new American cooking is beautifully presented in Ancient Grains. 82 MB·233 Downloads·New! : amaranth, quinoa, corn (maize), wheat, spelt, QK-77, triticale, rye, oats, rice, barley. Nuclear Physics: Exploring the Heart of Matter. 276 Pages·2013·672 KB·102,671 Downloads·New!

Growing whole grains is simpler and more rewarding than most people imagine.

Learn to grow, harvest, store, grind, and cook nine popular whole grains

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Cultivating these crops is surprisingly easy, and it takes less space than you might imagine - with just 1,000 square feet of growing space in your backyard, you can grow enough wheat to supply ingredients for 50 loaves of delicious fresh bread.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Homegrown Whole Grains: Grow, Harvest, and Cook .

Homegrown Whole Grains by Sara Pitzer 9781603421539 (Paperback, 2009) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 12 to 14 working days. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 3 brand new listings.

In addition to providing information on wheat and corn, Homegrown Whole Grains includes complete growing .

In addition to providing information on wheat and corn, Homegrown Whole Grains includes complete growing, harvesting, and threshing instructions for barley, millet, oats, rice, rye, spelt, and quinoa, and lighter coverage of several specialty grains. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Learn to grow, harvest, store, grind, and cook nine popular whole grains. Sara Pitzer provides complete instructions for growing your own wheat, corn, barley, millet, oats, rice, rye, spelt, and quinoa, as well as recipes for using these grains in tasty dishes. Cultivating these crops is surprisingly easy, and it takes less space than you might imagine — with just 1,000 square feet of growing space in your backyard, you can grow enough wheat to supply ingredients for 50 loaves of delicious fresh bread.
Reviews:
  • Sardleem
Sara Pitzer makes the growing of grain comprehensible and easy for those who have never tried it. There is good information on types of grain, the forms it is sold in, and detailed instructions for culture, including spacing of seed and rows (this is hard to find info). Most info on the web is aimed at farmers with tractors and seeders, and for cultivating acre sized plots. This book will be helpful to those with smaller plots. There are many recipes in the book, something I could have done without, but others may find useful. There is also excellent info on how to purchase the correct grain mill to grind fresh flour. I would say this book is well worth the purchase price and fun to read.
  • digytal soul
…written more for the gardener who wants to experiment with something different. You get short summaries of pretty much all the details you'd really need to get started. I found it kind of vague as to yields for grain types ( no "plant …square feet to feed …people") but appreciated the advice to try a small first planting because you might find the work involved to be too much. Not a farmers book but a home gardeners book. Recipes given for each grain too.
At the back there's a resource list for grain, tools, internet information, even a few books.
  • Wild Python
Great little book. This is not an academic treatise on the various and scientific niceties of growing grain. This is written to and for anyone without agricultural expertise. Instructions on growing and processing grains are concise and complete. The book also has some nice recipes. The only thing I'd like to have seen included is a short glossary for some of the terminology (lodging, e.g.), but those are easy enough to look up.
  • Akisame
This book is exactly what I wanted: a quick guide to growing grains at home. She is an excellent writer and I like how she is realistic about the effort and difficulty required to process some of the crops. You can tell that she has done all of this many times and has observed other people doing it, and she knows where the problems will arise, especially in the discouragement department. The list of seed sources in the back is very useful. When I got this book I opened it up and read it through and had trouble putting it down. Thanks, Ms. Pitzer.
  • PanshyR
This was a great resource on growing grains. Based on the information here, I decided to try to grow oats and barley in my wet and cool northern climate. The hull-less varieties I selected grew well enough, but the barley soon succumbed to aphids that loved the thick, juicy stems. The oats with their thin stems didn't attract any aphids, but the seed heads didn't open properly due to mold forming on the husks. It was a tedious job to squeeze the seeds out of the seed husks. The book is a great introduction to growing grains and also gives recipes for each type of grain.
  • Cordaron
Lots of info, very informative. After reading this book I feel ready to go out and prepare the field and plant. This book clearly lays out the positives and negatives of growing each grain and makes suggestions on where to buy the best seed, how to prepare soil, how to maintain until harvest, how to harvest, and how to prepare for storage. Even gives recipes to help you use your grain. And the illustrations of the plants and grains up close are very helpful.
  • lacki
Truly covers all that you need to know to start growing small plots of grain at home.
In not much room, you can provide a significant portion of your food grains each year!
Excellent resources list toward the back, for buying all those little things that USED to be common in every toolshed, but you don't see around any more. Seed distributors, tools, scythes, lists for everything.
I highly recommend this book!
It's the perfect book for a beginner like myself. Simple and easy to comprehend. Great resource for someone who wants to grow a small patch of grain in their backyard. Definitely not for anyone who may be well seasoned in growing grain.