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Transport for Suburbia: Beyond the Automobile Age download ebook

by Paul Mees

Transport for Suburbia: Beyond the Automobile Age download ebook
ISBN:
1844077403
ISBN13:
978-1844077403
Author:
Paul Mees
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (December 16, 2009)
Language:
Pages:
240 pages
ePUB:
1181 kb
Fb2:
1320 kb
Other formats:
docx mbr txt lrf
Category:
Engineering
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

It is time to move beyond the automobile age. But while public transport has worked well in the dense cores of some big .

It is time to move beyond the automobile age. But while public transport has worked well in the dense cores of some big cities, the problem is that most residents of developed countries now live in dispersed suburbs and smaller cities and towns.

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The argument in Transport for Suburbia is that density is not a necessary prerequisite for an effective transit system, and that transfers can be used as a tool to expand the scope of a transit network. But while public transport has worked well in the dense cores of some big cities, the . Paul Mees is Senior Lecturer in transport planning at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology

It is time to move beyond the automobile age. Paul Mees is Senior Lecturer in transport planning at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. He is the author of A Very Public Solution: Transport in the Dispersed City (Melbourne University Press, 2000). Bibliographic information.

Transport For Suburbia book. Start by marking Transport For Suburbia: Beyond The Automobile Age as Want to Read

Transport For Suburbia book. The need for effective public transport is greater than ever. Start by marking Transport For Suburbia: Beyond The Automobile Age as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

1. Public Transport 101 2. The Automobile Age 3. Beyond the Automobile Age 4. The Compact City 5. Planning, Markets and Public Transport 6. Toronto and Melbourne Revisited 7. The Busway Solution 8. The Zurich Model 9. Towards a General Theory of Public Transport Network Planning 10. Planning a Network 11.

In this thought-provoking book, Paul Mees provides a very personal and frank critique of many aspects of public . Transport for Suburbia is essential reading for everyone who fights for effective action on the climate crisis. - Eric Doherty, ww. abble.

In this thought-provoking book, Paul Mees provides a very personal and frank critique of many aspects of public transport planning, finance, and operations in Australia, New Zealand, the US, and the U. - John Pucher, Built Environment recommended reading. Philip Laird, Australian Options. should be widely read - and the lessons implemented. Journal of Transport Geography.

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The need for effective public transport is greater than ever in thetwenty-first century. With countries like China and India moving towards mass-automobility, we face the prospects of an environmental and urban health disaster unless alternatives are found. It is time to move beyond the automobile age. But while public transport has worked well in the dense cores of some big cities, the problem is that most residents of developed countries now live in dispersed suburbs and smaller cities and towns. These places usually have little or no public transport, and most transport commentators have given up on the task of changing this: it all seems too hard.

Transport for Surburbiaargues that the secret of 'European-style' public transport lies in a generalizable model of network planning that has worked in places as diverse as rural Switzerland, the Brazilian city of Curitiba and the Canadian cities of Toronto and Vancouver. It shows how this model can be adapted to suburban, exurban and even rural areas to provide a genuine alternative to the car, and outlines the governance, funding and service planning policies that underpin the success of the world's best public transport systems.

Reviews:
  • Dreladred
If you want to get your city a functional mass transit system but you don't want to drive density then there is hope. Mees looks at less dense cities all over the world, and compares the actions and policies of those with good transportation systems and those without. This is a must-read for anyone interested in transportation system planning, especially in less dense areas.
  • Yozshujind
This book provides clear insight into why some cities have managed to create such high uses of public transport despite having fairly low population densities.

It effectively argues the absolute key to effective public transport is far more about intelligent timetable and route planning than any magic bullet infrastructure project.

The book provides many examples of what has worked and why, and contrasts these examples with transport initiatives that haven't worked as well, plainly pointing out why some ideas have worked well and why others have been inefficient.

Finally the book runs through some hypothetical examples which can be used as a base for intelligent planning virtually anywhere.
  • Aria
Written by Paul Mees, this book should be required reading for anyone involved in managing, planning or operating public transportation. This well-documented book makes an excellent case that many of the commonly-accepted beliefs held by many academically trained transit planners are faulty. The book documents that the keys to effective public transportation are found in Toronto, Vancouver and rural Switzerland. This book paints the path to successful transit systems.
  • Rageseeker
This book is an excellent review of the current state of Mass Transit and provides a clear explanation of best practices and WHY they work! Every transit professional and public policy person should read this book and follow its advice.
This book can help to save the environment.
This book shows how and why great transit can be implemented anywhere starting now!

I highly recommend this book!!!
  • Ces
Thoroughly enjoyable and an easy read, especially for a person involved with urban transport policy for many years
  • Kazigrel
This book provides a good, interesting discussion starting with a narrative of the successes and failures of public transit system in the Anglosphere, showing that density is not a determinant for public transit usage and that an integrated network approach coordinated by a single organization in charge of the tactical aspects of the system has resulted in high transit usage even in urban regions with low density. The book then continues to examine successful policies for creating a better "anywhere to anywhere all the time" network that can be truly competitive against the private automobile. I think this sentence by the author really sums it up: "Density is not the main barrier to providing public transport that offers a real alternative to the car; rather, it is rationalization for inaction." This book goes about showing that effective transport for suburbia is possible and sheds light on how that might be accomplished.
  • Monam
Abridged review. Paul Mees revisits Melbourne and Toronto (from his year 2000 book) and discusses many other cities including Perth, Auckland, London, Los Angeles, Singapore and Vancouver, with special attention to Zurich.
Much detail - both historical and recent - on public transport in Australia and overseas is given. The author's preference is for `European-style' public transport with an urgent need for alternatives to the car due to "problems like climate change and insecure oil supplies."
There are some gaps, including Australia's largest city of Sydney and Victoria's regional fast rail (an outstanding success), whilst some details about the development of light rail in North America and "the environmental and social costs of automobile-dominated cities" would have been helpful. Overall, and with numerous references, it is recommended reading.
For the full review, including complementary books on related topics, see Australian Options, Winter 2010, page 32 or contact [email protected]
My copy of this book sat waiting on my shelf for months - I should have dived in straight away. It is highly informative, easy to read, thought-provoking - and at times even funny. Every planner and public official should read it.