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Quirky Qwerty: A Biography of the Typewriter and Its Many Characters download ebook

by Torbjorn Lundmark

Quirky Qwerty: A Biography of the Typewriter and Its Many Characters download ebook
ISBN:
0142002704
ISBN13:
978-0142002704
Author:
Torbjorn Lundmark
Publisher:
Penguin Books (August 26, 2003)
Language:
Pages:
176 pages
ePUB:
1962 kb
Fb2:
1762 kb
Other formats:
lrf rtf txt azw
Category:
Engineering
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

This charming book whisks the reader through a fascinating, lighthearted history of an object most people take for granted: the keyboard.

This charming book whisks the reader through a fascinating, lighthearted history of an object most people take for granted: the keyboard. Recounting the development of "Qwerty," the modern typing system millions use everyday-named for the first six letters on the keyboard, . Torbjörn Lundmark taps out a neat archaeology of each letter and symbol and brings the This charming book whisks the reader through a fascinating, lighthearted history of an object most people take for granted

This book has lots of characters "Ample drawings, poems and notes are used to tell how the keyboard itself came to have its quirky layout, and the history of the letters, numbers, signs and symbols w. .

This book has lots of characters. It tells the story of each character on the computer keyboard, as well as the multitude of additional marks that cannot be found on the keys but can still be typed by anyone using a computer. Ample drawings, poems and notes are used to tell how the keyboard itself came to have its quirky layout, and the history of the letters, numbers, signs and symbols we encounter in everyday written communication. All are covered in this book, including the hash, the dollar sign, all the punctuation marks, and that very old but very 'with-it' cyber-symbol, the . -BOOK JACKET.

This charming book whisks the reader through a fascinating, lighthearted history .

book by Torbjorn Lundmark. This charming book whisks the reader through a fascinating, lighthearted history of an object most people take for granted: the keyboard.

Lundmark, Torbjorn Quirky Qwerty: A Biography of the Keyboard (2002). Taruskin, Richard (2005). The Oxford history of western music, Volume 3, p. 311. ISBN 978-0-19-516979-9. Ahrens, C. Donald (2011). Essentials of meteorology: an invitation to the atmosphere (6th e. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole. p. 461. ISBN 9780840049339.

Read Quirky Qwerty PDF by Torbjorn Lundmark Penguin Books Listen to Quirky Qwerty: A Biography of the Typewriter and Its Many Characters audiobook by Torbjorn Lundmark .ещё +1. Random stuff and stolen tags от ThatOneGuy. 8 1 4. What the heck do I put here? it's 10 o'clock right now! qwerty. QWERTY от ♛ƬΉΛƬ PΣKKΛЯIПΣП♛.

Fonts that provide the Unicode character include Arial Unicode MS. Lundmark, Torbjorn Quirky Qwerty: A Biography of the Keyboard (2002).

Fonts that provide the Unicode character include Arial Unicode MS, Code2000, Lucida Sans Unicode, Lucida Grande, MS (P)Mincho and Segoe U.An asterism or its analogue may be used in conjunction with the extra space to mark a smaller subdivision than a sub-chapter.

About Torbjorn Lundmark. Torbjoern Lundmark (known as TL) was born in Sweden and has called Australia home since 1978. He works as a professional writer, illustrator and cartoonist, and is the author of several books, including Quirky Qwerty: The Story of the Keyboard at Your Fingertips.

Torbjorn Lundmark: Quirky Qwerty. Lundmark is a livewire linguist with as much character as the keyboard itself

Torbjorn Lundmark: Quirky Qwerty. Lundmark is a livewire linguist with as much character as the keyboard itself. He breathes the keys to life, denoting a history and personality to each letter, and going right back to ancient hieroglyphics to explain how we got to where we are today with our alphabet and punctuation. He even explains why we dot our "i"s. It was first added, he quips, by a scribe in the Middle English period who had an i for clarity and a desire to make a point.

This charming book whisks the reader through a fascinating, lighthearted history of an object most people take for granted: the keyboard. Recounting the development of "Qwerty," the modern typing system millions use everyday-named for the first six letters on the keyboard, Q.W.E.R.T.Y.-Torbjörn Lundmark taps out a neat archaeology of each letter and symbol and brings the discussion into the twenty-first century by addressing the role of punctuation in the digital age. Lundmark's vast knowledge, solid research, and friendly, digestible style make this a perfect book for both the casual word-buff and the experienced linguist.
Reviews:
  • tref
Quirky QWERTY: A Note on the Type by Torbjörn Lundmark was a short book about the history of the typewriter and the keys found on it. Note that the subtitle on the front cover is different from what is on the formal title page (which is the subtitle that counts). Lundmark provided very brief histories about each of the twenty-six letters of the alphabet as well as other typewriter keys, and I was surprised to learn that many of them evolved from Egyptian hieroglyphics. However, in the introduction, Lundmark provided the caveat that:

"This is not a scientific work. In fact, nothing in this book can be said to be absolutely true. Even if it were a scientific book this fact would not change. Scholars still argue about the origins of the alphabet and what the letters signify, and why the numbers look the way they do, and how all the other characters that appear in these pages came about."

So after I read that, I thought gee thanks. Now I don't know if what I just read is true or not. But this pocketbook of 172 pages was stylized to be a fun and visual read, not a scientific one. Nevertheless, Lundmark did ask a relevant question at the beginning:

"In our modern times of computers and electronics rather than mechanics, why haven't keyboards reverted to alphabetical order? There is no reason to worry about sticky type-bars anymore. So, why are we still stuck with the QWERTY keyboard?"

And the answer is simple: it is easier to stick to old standards than to invent new ways. The author did provide illustrations of five alternative keyboards so one could compare the supposed ease in typing.

Writing did not start out with both capital and lower case letters. Capitals existed at first, and were designed to be blocky and angular to make them easier to chisel into rock such as granite. However as writing surfaces developed, such as papyrus, scribes found it a lot easier to create a cursive style that flowed because the angles and edges found on capitals tore the leaves. Reducing the number of features found on capitals, such as B becoming b and R becoming r made the writing experience easier and faster. Hence the birth of both the lower case and cursive writing.

I found the origin of the terms "upper case" and "lower case" to be most interesting:

"'Upper-case' and 'lower-case' are printer's terms. The typographer's job was to fit individual pieces of type, cast in metal, into a wooden frame to make up the text of a newspaper column or a page of a book. Each letter was picked up by hand and placed into the frame.
"The metal type was kept on two trays, or cases, one above the other. The lower case held the minuscule type, which was used more frequently, and the upper case contained the capital letters, which were used less often."

Symbols were discussed as well, however the 2002 publication date preceded the advent of Twitter, thus there is no mention of the networking site when discussing the various functions for the # symbol.
  • Ynneig
Torbjorn Lundmark Quirky Qwerty: A Biography of the Typewriter & Its Many Characters
There are many books about the letters of the alphabet.
This fascinating book is about these same 26 letters, ... no, 52 letters (don't forget lower-case: WHY are the "little letters" called "lower-case"?) ... and then ALL the other characters on the keyboard of a classic typewriter, or computer keyboard.
QWERTYUIOP - the top line of letters - gives the title.
Each alphabetical letter has a remarkable personal history!
So does each non-letter character:
1, 2, 3, ... ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( and so on.
The book is short, pithy, and extremely informative.
Essential reading for people who like to know important things.
Writing, after all, is one of humanity's most important cultural tools!
Very, very highly recommended!
John Gough - Deakin University, retired - [email protected]
  • Voodoogore
I thought "Quirky Qwerty" would be an in-depth history of the typewriter. It ended up being a brief history on the characters and symbols on the typewriter.

The layout of the book is highly visual, and typesetting plays a big part in the contents, which makes it somewhat catchy However, with the exception of a few points at the beginning of the book, Lundmark added nothing new to what is already known (at least to me; if you find otherwise, modesty forbids). There were also numerous typographical errors throughout the text.
In one instance, a sentence was left unfinished.

This book is catchy, but it offers little in turn.
  • Malodor
What this book is good for: short, concise historical backgrounds on the letters of the alphabet and punctuation.

What this book is bad for: reading. Well-intentioned, but a terminally corny tone makes this book pretty unbearable.