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The Story of the World: History for the Classical Child, Volume 2: The Middle Ages: From the Fall of Rome to the Rise of the Renaissance download ebook

by Patty Martirosian,Jay Wise,Sharon Wilson,Susan Wise Bauer

The Story of the World: History for the Classical Child, Volume 2: The Middle Ages: From the Fall of Rome to the Rise of the Renaissance download ebook
ISBN:
0971412936
ISBN13:
978-0971412934
Author:
Patty Martirosian,Jay Wise,Sharon Wilson,Susan Wise Bauer
Publisher:
Well-Trained Mind Pr (March 2003)
Language:
Pages:
424 pages
ePUB:
1923 kb
Fb2:
1864 kb
Other formats:
rtf lrf mbr lrf
Category:
Schools & Teaching
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

The Story of the World: History for the Classical Child, Volume 3: Early Modern Times by Susan Wise Bauer .

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Susan Wise Bauer has provided a captivating guide to the history of other lands. Volume 2: The Middle Ages, is the second of a four-volume series and covers the major historical events in the years 400 to 1600 CE, as well as including maps, illustrations, and tales from each culture.

Activity Book 2 Grade Recommendation: Grades 1-. .

Due to the breadth of the survey, there's little material connecting what .

Due to the breadth of the survey, there's little material connecting what happens in one place and time to any other. Western-centric: Bauer includes lots of material on other cultures, it's true, but most of this is through the lens of Western history. And she does a much better job than most other material for this age group .

Since 1994, the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board has been involved in developing.

Absolute Key To Occult Science, The Tarot Of The Bohemians. 56 MB·71,354 Downloads·New!. Since 1994, the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board has been involved in developing.

Published April 16, 2007 by Peace Hill Press. What if you owned a magic carpet? The Physical Object.

This second book in the four-volume narrative history series for .

This second book in the four-volume narrative history series for elementary students will transform your study of history. The Story of the World has won awards from numerous homeschooling magazines and readers' polls-over 150,000 copies of the series in print! Product Identifiers. Her books include The Story of Science: From the Writings of Aristotle to the Big Bang Theory, The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home, The Well-Educated Mind: A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had, the History of the World series (W. W. Norton) and the Story of the World series (Well-Trained Mind Press).

The Story of the World: History for the Classical Child (Peace Hill Press). Volume 2: The Middle Ages (2003). Volume 3: Early Modern Times (2004). Volume 4: The Modern Age (2005). Volume 1: Ancient Times (rev. e. 2006). The Well-Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home (rev. Norton, 2004). The History of the. ANCIENT.

A guide to the Middle Ages, discussing events, people, and practices around the world from 500 to 1500.
Reviews:
  • Yalone
I've been homeschooling my children for 16 years, and was homeschooled as a child, as well. Throughout this journey, I have not seen a more fun and engaging history text for children than Story of the World. It flows like a story (which is how I believe history is best taught) and doesn't bog down in too many details. I believe it draws students in with the excitement of history and leaves them hungering for more.

I do history with all of my children at the same time, so my current students are 5, 7, 10, and 15. They all enjoy these stories, and are able to see how history is not a disconnected, unrelated jumble of names and dates, but a fascinating story that continues to this day.

We use this book as one of our "spines" and supplement with lots of other books to expand the narrative (as suggested in the Activity Guide in this series). I read aloud from this book (and series) almost daily. Highly recommended!
  • Sermak Light
Pros:
The greatest strength of this book is that Mrs. Bauer gets to the point of what is significant about the people or events she presents. Many books tell interesting stories, but few tell why they matter. I really appreciate this facet of the book.

In addition to history, the author gives simplified summaries of significant myths and literature (e.g., Beowulf, the Arabian Nights). These stories are probably one of our daughter's favorite parts of the book.

Our child likes the readings.

Cons:
In order to give a summary that is simple enough for a child to grasp, many thing must be omitted which inadvertently distorts history, but I don't see any way around that for this level of study.

Being a survey of world history, there is no connected narrative. You're in Europe one week and China another. My child finds this interesting, but I wonder if she'll retain very much of what we're studying. I would prefer a connected story of Western Civilization to World History.

Conclusion:
Our child enjoys the stories and the author does a good job summarizing what's significant, rather than burdening students with irrelevant minutiae. I question how much she'll retain, because each chapter is brief and moves from place to place. However, if she likes it should spark her interest in history as she gets older.

We are finding supplemental readings (biographies or historical fiction) for people who I think are interesting or significant, and I recommend that for anyone who uses this book.

Two other supplements we are using are Bauer's activity book - the map exercises are nicely done - and the Sonlight "Book of Time," so that we can locate people and events in time as well as place.
  • Swordsong
We love Story of the World! After using V.1 with our two oldest children, we knew we wanted to keep using the program and bought v.2.

The thing I love about this book is that is can be used for so many different age groups and since it is a story book, you can read it over and over again. I love anything that can be used for many children, it saves me so much money in the long run.

Right now, we are using this, along with the activity books, for our fourth and fifth grader. We do from time to time, come up with extra activities, if the kids have really enjoyed learning something. The two books combined are a pretty complete curriculum.

Story telling can really made history come alive for kids! I highly recommend this program.
  • Arashitilar
PROS: Easy-to-read, fairly engaging, a good mix of history and folk stories, hits most of the big stuff. I like that it's mostly text with relatively few pictures. We supplement with DK publishing histories, which are less thorough and less-well organized, but have great pictures, so that the kids get a good sense of the look of things as well.

CONS: Def. Western-centric (though less than some of its competitors), and def. focused more on wars/politicians/history of power, and not much at all on history of ideas, art, philosophy, etc. Due to the breadth of the survey, there's little material connecting what happens in one place and time to any other.

Western-centric: Bauer includes lots of material on other cultures, it's true, but most of this is through the lens of Western history. Which is fair. And she does a much better job than most other material for this age group. If you use the book as a backbone rather than a sole resource, it should mostly work out anyway. I found it necessary to also buy a) a more completist survey that I use to supplement or contextualize when random non-Western countries show up in SOTW and b) a full-on history of China. Because Bauer has the kids so engaged with text, I found sources that were comics for these things: Cartoon History of the Universe Volumes 1-7 Gonick's History of the Universe/Modern World series and Jin Lui's Understanding China through Comics series https://www.amazon.com/Foundations-Chinese-Civilization-Emperor-Understanding/dp/1611720273/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1510679206&sr=1-1&keywords=jing+liu&dpID=61JZ4KwqoaL&preST=_SX218_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_&dpSrc=srch

China has always been a tremendous power and has influenced much of history in that part of the world, so the terse coverage it receives in SOTW makes for some problems in giving children a more coherent idea of what happened almost anywhere East of Turkey.

History of Ideas: I would love to see the author in future editions make a list of resources at the end of each chapter... suggested art, music, important thinkers, scientists, etc. These are things you see in other courses of course, but as the history series tends to be the backbone for the classical education, it would simplify teaching greatly to find a short list of suggested related topics right in the text. I'm getting pretty good at balancing multiple history book (music, art, philosophy) on my desk at the same time, but I would have love to see these things more incorporated. Or, maybe a secondary textbook on history of ideas and culture? I appreciate the trickiness of organizing such a tremendous amount of information, so perhaps that would be the way to go.