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Dividing Classes: How the Middle Class Negotiates and Rationalizes School Advantage download ebook

by Ellen Brantlinger

Dividing Classes: How the Middle Class Negotiates and Rationalizes School Advantage download ebook
ISBN:
041593298X
ISBN13:
978-0415932981
Author:
Ellen Brantlinger
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (March 23, 2003)
Language:
Pages:
262 pages
ePUB:
1946 kb
Fb2:
1492 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc docx mbr
Category:
Schools & Teaching
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

In this study of the school system of an Indiana town, Ellen Brantlinger studies educational expectations within segments of the middle class that have fairly high levels of attainment. Building on her findings.

In this study of the school system of an Indiana town, Ellen Brantlinger studies educational expectations within segments of the middle class that have fairly high levels of attainment.

Dividing Classes book. In this study of the school system of an Indiana town, Ellen Brantlinger. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Dividing Classes: How the Middle Class Negotiates and Rationalizes School Advantage. by. Ellen Brantlinger. Building on her findings, she examines the relationship between class structure and educational success. This book asserts the need to look beyond poor peoples' values and aspirations-and rather to consider the values of dominant groups-to explain class stratification and educational outcomes.

the Middle Class Negotiates and Rationalizes School Advantage. How the Middle Class Negotiates and Rationalizes School Advantage. This pattern is replicated by suburban-urban divides in so many places.

There is an excellent book by Ellen Brantlinger titled, Dividing Classes: How the Middle Class Negotiates and Rationalizes School Advantage. There is an excellent book by Ellen Brantlinger titled, Dividing Classes: How the Middle Class Negotiates and Rationalizes School Advantage. These municipalities of wealth right next to municipalities of poverty. Anyhow, thanks for posting this.

Dividing classes: How the middle class negotiates and rationalizes school advantage. In this study of the school system of an Indiana town, Ellen Brantlinger studies educational expectations within segments of the middle class that have fairly high levels of attainment. Building on her findings, she examines the relationship between class structure and educational success

Dividing Classes forces us to confront perhaps the most troubling and least .

Describes how members of the educated middle class act to secure the best of what schools have to offer for their own children and how they rationalize their actions. - Journal of Economic Literature. Ellen Brantlinger is Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at Indiana University, Bloomington.

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In this study of the school system of an Indiana town, Ellen Brantlinger studies educational expectations within segments of the middle class that have fairly high levels of attainment. Building on her findings, she examines the relationship between class structure and educational success. This book asserts the need to look beyond poor peoples' values and aspirations--and rather to consider the values of dominant groups--to explain class stratification and educational outcomes.
Reviews:
  • Jek
I give one star because its important to register this book in the negative as it pertains to the aggregate scoring. The book is an interesting read about the socioeconomic makeup of a district with the challenge of educating very different demographics and expectations of public education. Unfortunately, the author has a Liberal political viewpoint and it makes it difficult to fully engage in the book. I found this book because my daughters are currently in a mixed socioeconomic school district and have had the challenges and struggles that this diversity brings. The disruption my children feel during the course of the day is real and is mostly caused by children from poorer economic backgrounds. My focus is on my children and their educational success, with much sympathy for those low income children unable to contain themselves. Unfortunately, by trying to do good for all kids in the classroom you inevitably hurt your own high achieving kids. You have to listen to teachers, they have the first hand experience of what is going on in the classroom. Discounting these experiences as prejudiced is a cop out. What disappointed me the most about this book was how teachers who had a negative views about forced desegregation/tracking tactics and lower socioeconomic schools were labeled prejudiced when they offered their anecdotes and experiences with it. However, when the progressive teacher offered the wonders of mixed classes, of no tracking and the inevitable low expectations of the learning experience these anecdotes were treated with praise. The important point is both viewpoints were personal opinions and teacher experience and yet the Liberal point of view is viewed as the only valid one. There are no facts behind any of this social engineering in these schools. The big hurdle is somehow improving the parenting in these low income households, most of the children now entering public school are in poverty. These problems will only get worse, my fear is that the public education will be the bastion of lower economic children especially as you literally drive out the middle class and cater to the underclass.
  • from earth
I bought the book several years ago. I have been recently reading books about education and this book was referenced by two of the books I have read. I decided to go back and reread the book. It’s an eye opening look at how parents use their social class advantage to disadvantage th most vulnerable. The conclusion is powerful and revelatory. Thank you for writing the book.
  • Helldor
The author of this book interview numerous "liberal" mothers -- many her friends -- and discovers that when it comes to the choices that that they make concerning the education of their children they behave in very conservative ways. I do find this interesting and entertaining. At least we conservatives are up front about it.

Another reviewer said that the city profiled in the book is likely Bloomington, Ind. The author is upset because the city schools are somewhat segregated along socio-economic lines. Bloomington and the surrounding county are less than five percent black, so racial segregation and "racism" is not a real factor. And while I disagree with much of what the author says, she does point out things which are clearly wrong. For example, she interviewed one teacher or administrator who said that when children were being put into high and low ability groups those in the middle third were often placed on the basis of social class. The higher class children would go into the higher ability group to placate the parents.

Brantlinger is in favor of almost anything to bring about socio-economic integration, including forced busing. She opposes any sort of "tracking," but never really defines tracking. One gets the impression after reading the book that any type of advanced class, such as an AP class, is viewed as tracking. I was certainly left with the feeling that Brantlinger opposes AP classes altogether. Students who score a 5 can earn as many as nine college hours for a single AP class, easily shaving $5-10,000 off the cost of a college education. That's just one class, so Brantlinger's push to end AP classes could easily cost the typical family well in excess of $20,000 in additional college expenses.

I really don't know how the author could advocate the complete elimination of advanced classes which aren't open to everyone. For example, children tested for high math ability are often placed in algebra in seventh grade (after pre-algebra in sixth grade). From there they will take geometry, algebra II, trig, statistics, calculus ab, and calculus bc. There are studies showing that students who don't score well on algebra-readiness tests will likely fail the course and get in real trouble, but that the better students will be able to finish this sequence. Not everyone needs these highly developed math skills, but our nation does need some highly trained students in the pipeline. The type of enforced math ignorance the author seeks literally puts our nation at risk.

Brantlinger doesn't think people should be allowed to move into good neighborhoods in order to attend a better school, or a school filled with highly competitive students. And yet, people don't just move into neighborhoods for schools; they move into towns. If they author gets her way and ruins some of Bloominton's more competitive schools, the city itself will suffer as high-IQ people will turn down jobs there because of the lack of a top school. For her plan to work, the government will actually have to start assigning what city people are to live in.

The successful parents featured -- despite what they may say -- tend to want their children to benefit from traditional educational techniques and a classical curriculum. Apparently at the homogeneous schools everyone is happy with this. The author says these schools must be made more diverse, and of course these traditional methods and classical curriculum just will not do. In other words, like-minded parents simply cannot be allowed to have their children educated as they wish. It's a bit ironic that the author says the wealthy students are getting an advantage, but then she wants to destroy the very methods and curriculum that are supposedly giving them the advantage.

The author makes repeated reference to Marxist scholarship and after reading the book I would guess she might be one. She attended Antioch College, a school where there are no grades. I remember when I was looking at schools that one of the few rules there was that "shoes must be worn at graduation." Her world view is extremely far-left. People like this should not be allowed to ruin our schools.
  • Anayajurus
This was the first book I bought for my Kindle Fire... I was amazed how fast I could access it once it was ordered - immediately. Thank you.
  • Bys
Dr. Ellen Brantlinger has done a fascinating case study on the impact of social class on mothers' and teachers' perceptions of government-run education in an economically diverse small Midwestern city (presumably the author's hometown of Bloomington, IN). The book really made me examine how social class has influenced my own beliefs about education.

However, I was extremely frustrated by Dr. Brantlinger's assumptions about the underlying reasons behind her subjects' responses. She kept attributing very negative motivations to the upper-middle-class moms without providing any convincing evidence to back up her accusations. Dr. Brantlinger reads classism and a desire to continue social inequality into everything the wealthier moms say, in a way very reminiscent of Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson when it comes to racism.
  • Morad
This book is interesting because of the author's choice to focus on the middle class. Despite the fact that you may disagree with this approach (as i did in the beginning) it pushes one to think about the class positionality of the middle class and one's self as well. I would especially read this book if you are in the middle class and have children who will be or are in school now.