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Golden Age Of Marvel Volume 2 TPB (House of Ideas Collection) download ebook

by Mickey Spillane

Golden Age Of Marvel Volume 2 TPB (House of Ideas Collection) download ebook
ISBN:
0785107134
ISBN13:
978-0785107132
Author:
Mickey Spillane
Publisher:
Marvel Comics (March 9, 1999)
Language:
Pages:
176 pages
ePUB:
1226 kb
Fb2:
1216 kb
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Rating:
4.5

The Golden Age of Marvel Comics volume 2, released in 1999, is a collection of. .The book also features an introduction by the legendary Mickey Spillane. Overall, this book makes for an excellent read, especially for people interested in the early years of comic books.

The Golden Age of Marvel Comics volume 2, released in 1999, is a collection of various stories from Marvel Comics' Golden Age era (the first volume of The Golden Age of Marvel Comics was released in 1997). Back then, Marvel Comics was known as Timely Comics, and would later go on to become one of the most successful comic book publishers (alongside longtime competitor, DC Comics).

Volume II includes the first appearances by Ma Hot on the heels of the success of The Golden Age of Marvel . Very nice collection of Golden age and Silver age reprints. First appearance and origin of the Fiery Mask, Red Raven, the Vision and the Whizzer

Volume II includes the first appearances by Ma Hot on the heels of the success of The Golden Age of Marvel comes a second collection of classic stories from Marvel's earliest years - with a special introduction by former Marvel staffer and renowned author Mickey Spillane Chock full of some of Marvel's finest moments from the 1930s, '40s . First appearance and origin of the Fiery Mask, Red Raven, the Vision and the Whizzer. Recommended to anyone wanting to see and read the ear years of comics.

Book in the The Golden Age of Marvel Comics Series). Not all rain clouds lead to rainbows. Some form into ravaging thunderstorms, bringing pounding hail, wild winds, and bolts of lightning

Book in the The Golden Age of Marvel Comics Series). by Mickey Spillane and Marvel Comics. Some form into ravaging thunderstorms, bringing pounding hail, wild winds, and bolts of lightning. Winter storms are equally threatening, bringing terrible wind chills and mountains of snow.

In celebration of 65 years in comic book publishing the House of Ideas is proud to present the first four issues of.

In celebration of 65 years in comic book publishing the House of Ideas is proud to present the first four issues of the comic series that launched Marvel Comics. This monumental hardcover volume re-masters and restores these first four historic issues and collects them for the first time. Return to the Golden Age of comics with the original tales of Sub- Mariner, the Human Torch, the Angel, and Ka-Zar. Collects Golden Age Marvel Comics and Marvel Mystery Comics Marvel Masterworks: Golden Age Marvel Comics Issue 7 (Part 3). 12/29/2018.

The Golden Age of Comic Books describes an era of American comic books from 1938 to 1956. The superhero archetype was created and many well-known characters were introduced, including Superman, Batman, Captain Marvel, Captain America, and Wonder Woman. The first recorded use of the term "Golden Age" was by Richard A. Lupoff in an article, "Re-Birth", published in issue one of the fanzine Comic Art in April 1960.

April 30, 2011 History. Published February 1, 1999 by Marvel Comics. There's no description for this book yet. Golden Age Of Marvel Volume 2 TPB (House of Ideas Collection).

Age of Comic Books is generally recognized as beginning with the debut of.List of Marvel Comics Golden Age characters. Icons of the American Comic Book: From Captain America to Wonder Woman, Volume 1. Santa Barbara, California: Greenwood Publishing Group.

Age of Comic Books is generally recognized as beginning with the debut of the first successful new superhero since the Golden Age, DC Comics' new Flash, in Showcase (Oct. 1956). Modern Age of Comic Books. Silver Age of Comic Books. "Donald Duck "Lost in the Andes" The Comics Journal".

Marvel proudly presents more Golden Age goodness, collecting issues. This hardcover collection remasters and restores these early adventures, some reprinted for the very first time! 280 PG. All Ages. Unlock the world of Marvel Digital Comics! Your key for reading Marvel Unlimited and Digital Comic purchases across multiple devices. Get the latest news, original content, and special offers from Marvel. Get ready for more and more unusual, exciting, different and terrific adventures on land, in air and on sea! Tales of action, mystery and thrills with death and danger on every page.

The House of Ideas was the dwelling of the One-Above-All, the ultimate creator of everything. Within this space, infinite stories are born, and thoughts and ideas can take physical shape. The House has many entry points on Earth since humanity is essential to the One-Above-All's designs and one recently manifested in Hewlett Harbor, Long Island. One Above All. The name House of Ideas is based on name the Marvel Comics company used in the past. 4 Appearances of House of Ideas.

Collects Golden Age Marvel Comics and Marvel Mystery Comics (1939-1949) Volume 2 - 1st printing. Collects Marvel Mystery Comics (1939-1949)

Collects Golden Age Marvel Comics and Marvel Mystery Comics (1939-1949). In celebration of 65 years in comic book publishing the House of Ideas is proud to present the first four issues of the comic series that launched Marvel Comics. Return to the Golden Age of comics with the original tales of Sub-Mariner, the Human Torch, the Angel, and Ka-Zar. Softcover, 288 pages, full color. Volume 2 - 1st printing. Collects Marvel Mystery Comics (1939-1949)

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Reviews:
  • Qane
In the late '90s, Marvel was going down the tubes, both financially and creatively. There was an enormous amount of dreck flooding the shelves, and no matter what schemes they tried, either with product or licensing, they were losing money like crazy. Before declaring bankruptcy, they released two trade paperback collections of their Golden Age material, presenting a selection of the best of that era. While they may not have been well-received by the younger crowd, it was one of the best ideas Marvel had in a while (definitely going against the grain), and it was a treat for fans of comic history. Once again, readers could enjoy the simplistic stories of classic WW-II Marvel characters such as Captain America, Sub-Mariner, the Angel, the Destroyer, Marvel Boy, the Fin, Citizen V, and the Human Torch.
The Golden Age of Marvel Comics, Volumes 1 and 2 can be considered Marvel's equivalent of a public service. It's historical preservation in a market that has a notoriously short attention span. When the majority of fans and retailers were demanding more high-octane heroes showering their foes with bullets, we got two beautiful yet affordable collections of Golden Age greats, showing readers that, while the stories and art of the Golden Age might not have been all that "golden", the characters and their appeal more than made up for it. You can clearly see the elements of these stories that fascinated aspiring writers and artists, leading to their expanding these characters in ways never dreamed of during Marvel's Silver Age and beyond. The covers for both volumes are beautiful: for 1, a battle scene by Ray Lago; for 2, a Kirby/Theakston image. The intros provide some very good historical perspective on the contents.
Marvel is now back on its feet, sort of, but don't expect these books to be reprinted anytime in the near future. The current crowd at Marvel seems to be even more out of touch than the previous one and apparently has no understanding of the treasure it is sitting on.
  • Cashoutmaster
The Golden Age of Marvel Comics volume 2, released in 1999, is a collection of various stories from Marvel Comics' Golden Age era (the first volume of The Golden Age of Marvel Comics was released in 1997). Back then, Marvel Comics was known as Timely Comics, and would later go on to become one of the most successful comic book publishers (alongside longtime competitor, DC Comics).
This book features stories with Marvel's "big three": the original Human Torch, Captain America, and The Sub-Mariner, as well as lesser known, now obscure characters like The Fin, Red Raven, and The Vision (I don't think this is the same one as the android Vision now appearing in Marvel's The Avengers series), as well as a few others. These classics are by the writers and artists of comics' Golden Age: Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, Bill Everett, Carl Burgos, and many others, including one story written by Stan Lee. The book also features an introduction by the legendary Mickey Spillane.
Overall, this book makes for an excellent read, especially for people interested in the early years of comic books. Most of the stories are set during World War II, so some people may be offended with the Germans and Japanese as the Nazis villains.
  • digytal soul
I picked this book up at a recent comic convention- I missed it upon initial release in 1997. It's a great compendium of early Timely/Marvel Comics stories (and only one by Stan Lee!), with perhaps half of the stories concentrating on the lesser-known Marvel characters.
The stories themselves aren't bad- they are at least a match for other "Golden Age" comics, and some of the stories are fairly lyrical, such as the reprint of the first Sub-Mariner story in Motion Picture Funnies Weekly #1.
A large proportion of the stories reprinted concern Captain America, Nazis, or both- the ethnic represntation of the Germans (and occasionally the Japanese) might be highly offensive to people unaware that they are reading uncensored stories published at the height of WWII.
My complaints are: many/most of the stories published in this trade paperback have been heavily reprinted in the past. Anyone with a collection of older Marvel Superheroes or Marvel Tales will already own half of the stories. Also, the printing quality of a couple of stories is akin to reading color photocpies... but for the most part the reprints are clear and clean.
If you're interested in Marvel's past and don't yet own a stack of their reprint comics, then this trade paperback is a good investment.