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Peter Parker Spider-Man Vol. 1: A Day in the Life download ebook

by Paul Jenkins,Mark Buckingham,J. G. Jones,Sean Phillips

Peter Parker Spider-Man Vol. 1: A Day in the Life download ebook
ISBN:
0785107770
ISBN13:
978-0785107774
Author:
Paul Jenkins,Mark Buckingham,J. G. Jones,Sean Phillips
Publisher:
Marvel Enterprises; First Edition (US) First Printing edition (June 1, 2001)
Language:
Pages:
160 pages
ePUB:
1924 kb
Fb2:
1274 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr azw mobi
Category:
Graphic Novels
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

Flashbacks on his life as a child help create the man he is now and the hero he then later becomes. Jenkins takes you all the way, with a day in the life.

Flashbacks on his life as a child help create the man he is now and the hero he then later becomes. The witty humor and the pretenses don't leave you laughing out loud, but keep giving you that smile that you carry on throughout the story. Anyone could be Spider-Man given the right circumstances, but it is only Peter Parker that makes the character who he really is. You feel the loneliness that he feels and the sadness that he carries each day with him.

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Paul Jenkins, Mark Buckingham, J. G. Jones (Illustrator), Sean Phillips (Illustrator). Published by Marvel Entertainment Group (2001)

Paul Jenkins, Mark Buckingham, J. Published by Marvel Entertainment Group (2001). ISBN 10: 0785107770 ISBN 13: 9780785107774.

by Paul Jenkins, Mark Buckingham

Peter Parker Spider-Man Vol. 1. Paul Jenkins, Mark Buckingham. Peter Parker Spider-Man Vol. 1 Close. by Paul Jenkins, Mark Buckingham. Published June 1, 2001 by Marvel Entertainment Group.

Reexamining his life and role as a costumed crime-fighter, Peter Parker comes to grips with a great personal loss, explores his friendship with the Human Torch . Peter Parker: Spider-Man (1999) Stories.

Peter Parker: Spider-Man (1999) Stories.

Sean Phillips is an comic book . A comic book artist, known primarily for his acclaimed cover work. Peter Parker: Spider-Man: A Day in the Life.

Sean Phillips is an comic book artist noted for his work on Hellblazer and collaborations with Ed Brubaker. A British comic book writer with a wide and varied career. Recently he wrote Lantern City for Archaia, an imprint of Boom! Studios, Spawn: Resurrection for Image Comics and is working on the following Spawn issues since.

Peter Parker: Spider-Man is the name of two comic book series published by Marvel Comics, both of which feature the character Spider-Man. Peter Parker: Spider-Man (originally titled simply Spider-Man), was a monthly comic book series published by Marvel Comics that ran for 98 issues from 1990 to 1998.

While Peter Parker re-examines his life and his role as Spider-Man, he battles Sandman and comes to the realization that he is partially responsible for the Sandman's condition, and he also tries to do stand-up comedy.
Reviews:
  • Nikojas
This is a dark book that swings too far to an extreme in Spider-man's world. Personal problems and even personal tragedy have always been part of the Spider-man world but this book takes this to an extreme.

In some ways, you can't quite blame Paul Jenkins for this because Marvel mashes together a three part story from the Spider-man magazine Webspinners from 1999 with Jenkins earliest work on Peter Parker Spider-man a year later. Both visit similar themes and are somewhat redundant when shoved into the same trade.

The first three part story "The Scoop" is somewhat inane with the Chameleon going around in a ski mask and being emo in the first two parts with the last part of the story being Spider-man sitting around recalling all the tragedy in his life including the deaths of Captain Stacy and Gwen Stacy.

Jenkins first work on Peter Parker Spider-man in Issue 20 has his moaning and crying at the grave of Uncle Ben about the unhappiness of his life and the death of Uncle Ben. To be fair, he had good reason for this as he was deeply depressed after his wife had apparently been killed. And so the sadness and grief in Issues 20 and 21 were appropriate in the context of the original comics. In this trade, it means we start out with five consecutive issues of almost pure depression.

At the start of Issue 22, we get to see Jenkins potential beyond merely showing Spider-man depressed as Peter goofs off and has a moment's reprise.,,before getting see the Sandman reach an ignominious end that's as depressing if not more so than the Chameleon's.

Then we see Issue 26 which is a great premise that has police officers sharing their thoughts on Spider-man including opinions and some fun mini-stories. Of course, as Jenkins is writing it, it also revisits the death of the Stacys. Although there's a fair bit of lighter stuff thrown in to give a more balanced portrayal.

In the end, this book isn't so much bad as it is unpleasant. Even accounting for how Marvel's decisions in printing this trade account for many of its shortcomings, Jenkins delves too much into Spider-man's past. However, Marvel amplifies this by collecting so many depressing stories in the same book.
  • Budar
What makes Spider-Man a fascinating character is not his great powers, but the man behind the mask, Peter Parker. Spidey has enjoyed tremendous success ever since his conception nearly 40 years ago. Throughout all this time, the most unique thing about him was not the colorful suit he wears while swinging, but the simple average, all-so human Peter Parker. Stan Lee, his creator, knew that a long time ago and what better way to bring this character to life but through mastery of one of the hottest British writers of all time, Paul Jenkins.
Jenkins became a household name with his unbelievable work on the INHUMANS, but it is here in his take on Spidey that he truly does shine. His characterization is par none, he takes you on a trip into the Spider-Man saga and fills in points of history, with original art of that time, but never truly changes anything for the old reader. He makes things come to life with his words. The take on going back and forth in the past sure does display his powers as a writer. This is a man that was set to write any hero and make him out to be more human than the people you see walking the street everyday while going to work.
The whole story delves completely on Peter Parker and how his life as Spider-Man has come to be in the recent years. This is a man who has been through much and still persevered to tell the tale. He is your average guy who you might bump into while playing softball in the park or the guy next to you in the movie theater. He is a living, breathing human being and not a comic book character. At times, a person might think that he's probably too human with all his flaws and gestures. The TPB starts off with how the Chameleon, one of Spidey's first foes views him. This trip goes without saying is an in-depth look at Spidey and Peter Parker that has never been explored before. This culminates in Chapter 3 where Spidey is defined as the true character he really is. The following 4 chapters take you on a ride of how Spidey came to be through the eyes of Peter Parker. Flashbacks on his life as a child help create the man he is now and the hero he then later becomes. Jenkins takes you all the way, with a day in the life. The witty humor and the pretenses don't leave you laughing out loud, but keep giving you that smile that you carry on throughout the story. Anyone could be Spider-Man given the right circumstances, but it is only Peter Parker that makes the character who he really is. You feel the loneliness that he feels and the sadness that he carries each day with him. The loss of his loved ones, his uncle and his wife. You just learn that no matter, to be who you are, you have to learn how to laugh. In the end, that's what helps us being ourselves. That's what makes us appreciate our life for what it is. This is a smart piece of fiction, superbly written by Jenkins and drawn by the industry's top artists.
Spider-Man is a comic character, but Peter Parker is a real man in all sense of the word.