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Apologia Pro Vita Sua (Classics of Spiritual Writing) download ebook

by John Henry Newman

Apologia Pro Vita Sua (Classics of Spiritual Writing) download ebook
ISBN:
0722073089
ISBN13:
978-0722073087
Author:
John Henry Newman
Publisher:
Sheed & Ward Ltd (March 1973)
Language:
Pages:
256 pages
ePUB:
1771 kb
Fb2:
1275 kb
Other formats:
lrf mobi lrf txt
Category:
Theology
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Apologia Pro Vita Sua appeared in 1864. Ian Ker has a MA from Oxford and a P. from Cambridge.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. John Henry Newman, one of the towering figures of the early Victorian Church of England, caused shock and outrage in equal measure when he announced his espousal of Roman Catholicism in 1845. He was ordained a Roman Catholic Priest in 1979 and has taught at universities in Britain and the United States.

Apologia Pro Vita Sua (Latin: A defence of one's own life) is John Henry Newman's defence of his religious opinions, published in 1864 in response to Charles Kingsley of the Church of England after Newman quit his position as the Anglican . .

Apologia Pro Vita Sua (Latin: A defence of one's own life) is John Henry Newman's defence of his religious opinions, published in 1864 in response to Charles Kingsley of the Church of England after Newman quit his position as the Anglican vicar of St. Mary's, Oxford. Friction during the years from 1833 to 1841 had led Newman and his allies in the Oxford Movement to publish a statement, the Tracts for the Times, to which Newman was a contributor

Apologia Pro Vita Sua, Newman's spiritual autobiography, explores the depths and nature of Christianity with flowing prose and a conversational style that has . Apologia Pro Vita Sua - John Henry Newman.

Apologia Pro Vita Sua, Newman's spiritual autobiography, explores the depths and nature of Christianity with flowing prose and a conversational style that has ensured its status as a classic. False ideas may be refuted by argument, but by true ideas alone are they expelled. I will vanquish," Newman promised, "not my accuser, but my judges.

Apologia Pro Vita Sua book . A highly influential figure in the Church of England, John Henry Newman stunned the Anglican community in 1843, when he left his position as vicar of St. Mary's, Oxford, to join the Roman Catholic church. Apologia Pro Vita Sua, Newman's spiritual autobiography, explores the depths and nature of Christianity with flowing prose and a conversational style that has ensured its status as a classic.

Having inspired and led the Oxford or Tractarian Movement before he abandoned Anglicanism for the Church of Rome, Newman regularly found himself the target of virulent anti-Catholic prejudice in Victorian England. The Apologia was his autobiographical response to a public attack by the novelist Charles Kingsley on his personal integrity

British theologian JOHN HENRY CARDINAL NEWMAN (1801-1890)-a leading figure in both the Church of England and .

British theologian JOHN HENRY CARDINAL NEWMAN (1801-1890)-a leading figure in both the Church of England and, after his conversion, the Roman Catholic Church-was known as "The Father of the Second Vatican Council. A classic of Christian apologetics, this 1865 spiritual biography of the vicar who stunned the Church of England when he abandoned it for Roman Catholicism plumbs the depths of the faith that Catholicism inspires. Structured as a response to one of his greatest public critics, it remains a beloved work to this day.

LibriVox recording of Apologia Pro Vita Sua, by John Henry Cardinal Newman. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff.

Title: Apologia pro Vita Sua. Author: John Henry Newman. Newman was already a recognised spiritual leader of over thirty year's standing, but not yet a Cardinal, when in 1864 he wrote the Apologia. He was London born, and he had, as many Londoners have had, a foreign strain in him. His father came of Dutch stock; his mother was a Fourdrinier, daughter of an old French Huguenot family settled in this country.

The Best Spiritual Autobiography. com User, September 28, 2000.

book by John Henry Newman. It is interesting to note that John Henry Cardinal Newman's Apologia Pro Vita Sua is as well regarded for its literary value as for its theological depth. The Best Spiritual Autobiography.

Reviews:
  • Aedem
I am here reviewing the Dover Giant Thrift paperback edition, which I highly recommend. I note this as this review may show up under some other edition. The Dover paperback is priced at $5 US on the back, and is over 300 pages. It's a very clean reprint of the 1908 Longmans and Green British edition, and includes numerous notes and letters in the back, as well as Kingsley's attack on Newman, which prompted his apology.

I became curious about Newman because so many people mention him on "The Journey Home", a show on EWTN, as being instrumental in their spiritual journeys. Also, there's a video of Malcolm Muggeridge in which he and his wife, Kitty, are reading Newman aloud MALCOLM MUGGERIDGE Also, the Newman centers for Catholic students at universities are named for Newman (although it conveniently sounds like New Man).

What I did not think is that this book would be easy reading, as most works from 170 years ago are not. The back cover remarks of Newman's "flowing prose and conversational style", and believe it or not, it's true. This is one of the most delightful books I've read in a long time. I knew very little about the Anglican controversies mentioned, but Newman reveals more about them as the book goes on. Also, the names and places are all unfamiliar, but they also are in a fantasy novel. It will sound odd, but this book reads like science fiction, not in the sense of unfolding a plot or story, but because of the imaginative way in which Newman writes, and his felicitous turns of phrase. For that reason, when he drops in a slogan of his day which his contemporary readers would understand, those are so dated that it rarely makes his point clearer now.

There are a few brief Latin quotes, not translated into English, but other than that, it's quite smooth going. Every now and then he lifts into amazing prose like this idea of the Catholic Church as "a vast assemblage of human beings with wilful intellects and wild passions, brought together into one by the beauty and Majesty of a Superhuman Power-- into what may be called a large reformatory or training school, for the melting, refining and moulding, by an incessant, noisy process, of the raw material of human nature, so excellent, so dangerous, so capable of divine purposes."

This book makes Newman's views very clear. Why he became Catholic (and resisted doing so for so long); his attempts to chart a Via Media (Middle Way) in the Anglican Church, and how, in his view, he failed; his part in the Tractarian Movement, and the resulting controversies. The irony is that he didn't want to be followed or imitated, but after he converted to Rome, a great many Brits followed him into the Catholic Church.
  • Frei
This Penguin edition of Newman's "Apologia" is wonderful, its editor, Ian Ker, the most accomplished Newman scholar of our day. This is the edition to buy because it provides extensive materials beyond the main text (together with extremely helpful endnotes), without which it would be hard to understand the historical context and argument of the work.
Newman here defends the long process which led him from his high-profile role in the Church of England to his decision to convert to Roman Catholicism in 1845. If, however, you expect a deeply spiritual, even emotional account, beware! Newman summarizes his own life in these revealing terms: "From the age of fifteen, dogma has been the fundamental principle of my religion: I know no other religion" (p. 61). Now you are prepared. Most of the actual "Apologia" is taken up with Newman's slowly changing understanding of the dogmatic core of Christianity, as developed in the most fervent days of Christian dogmatics, the years 300-500. As crucial turning points in his changing religious allegiance theologians like the Monophysite Eustachius (ca. 450) or the semi-Arian bishop Miletius of Antioch (ca. 360) assume crucial importance. Without the helpful endnotes even the educated lay reader would be pretty much left in the dark. But then this book was not really written for lay readers but for theologians of his day, a group of contemporary Oxford and Cambridge scholars and ecclesiastics well versed in the Church Fathers. Newman had to defend himself against the Anglican charge that he served as a kind of secret agent of the Catholic church long before his actual conversion in order to undermine the theological thinking of the Anglican Church. In order to bolster his defense, he marshals a heavy mass of letters and other documents, written well before his conversion, to show his probity in the affair. Unfortunately, the modern reader only rarely can appreciate the often intricate subtleties of these endless polemics among a close circle of friends and enemies. There is no doubt that Newman played an important role in the religious life of England in the first half of the 19th century and no doubt that his conversion was a long-enduring shock for the Anglican Church. Still, much of the actual controversy can now only arouse a strictly historical interest.
The one exception to this stricture is the last chapter of the "Apologia," in which Newman describes his Catholic mindset 19 years after his actual conversion. A deeply conservative, thoughtful defender of the church and its infallibility (the pope's infallibility was only defined a few years later) emerges. This chapter by itself might well assure that Newman will continue to attract disciples and admirers.
  • Direbringer
In autobiographical form, a comprehensive account of this brilliant and scholarly Anglican priest's conversion to Catholicism. This man was an intellectual giant--head of the Oxford Movement. They were going to reform the Church. They were sure they had it all together and were on the right track. Like many others, he was fine until he began to read the Church Fathers. It was there where he first saw his error. He then began to study and master the history of the heretical Monophysites of the 5th century. He was also convinced that he was on the side of the Early Church and vice-versa. However, here he found that Rome stood exactly where it did currently in the nineteenth century, and his Anglican stand reflected the heretical sect. He said, "I saw my face in that mirror, and I was a Monophysite." Case closed! He explained, "Of all the passages of history, since history has been, who would have thought of going to the sayings and doings [of this heretical sect] in order to be converted to Rome!"