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Creating a Missional Culture: Equipping the Church for the Sake of the World download ebook

by Alan Hirsch,JR Woodward

Creating a Missional Culture: Equipping the Church for the Sake of the World download ebook
ISBN:
0830836535
ISBN13:
978-0830836536
Author:
Alan Hirsch,JR Woodward
Publisher:
IVP Books; 41082nd edition (July 5, 2012)
Language:
Pages:
256 pages
ePUB:
1544 kb
Fb2:
1960 kb
Other formats:
docx doc azw lrf
Category:
Churches & Church Leadership
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

His book Creating a Missional Culture reflects all of that.

His book Creating a Missional Culture reflects all of that. Read it and explore what leading can be in the strange new worlds of mission in North America. Lindner Chair of Evangelical Theology, Northern Seminary, author of The End of Evangelicalism?) "You are holding a hard-won treasure. By returning us to a polycentric, 5 fold ministry of equippers for the church for the sake of God, JR allows Jesus' words in Matthew 16:18 to be believable for us today: And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it. I recommend this to anyone looking to be the church to the culture they are sent to.

Creating a Missional Culture book. Once upon a time, Moses had had enough  . InCreating a Missional Culture, JR Woodward offers a bold and surprisingly refreshing model for churches-not small adjustments around the periphery of a church's infrastructure but a radical revisioning of how a church ought to look, from its leadership structure to its mobilization of the laity. The end result looks surprisingly like the church that Jesus created and the apostles cultivated: a church not chasing the wind but rather going into the world and making disciples of Jesus.

In Creating a Missional Culture, JR Woodward offers a bold and surprisingly refreshing model for churches-not small adjustments around the periphery of a church's infrastructure but a radical revisioning of how a church ought to look, from its leadership structure to its mobilization of the laity.

JR Woodward's remarkable book defies categorization

JR Woodward's remarkable book defies categorization. To 'create a missional culture' requires disciplined biblical and theological formation, discerning engagement with contemporary cultures, appreciative interaction with diverse resources, and the courage to experiment and to innovate. Woodward does all that and more in this book. Creating a Missional Culture delivers exactly that-a provocative guide for the intentional, Spirit-led creation of a church culture where Christ is incarnated in the lives of individuals and communities. Dr. MaryKate Morse, author of Making Room for Leadership.

As the volume of missional church literature increases, a segment of North America . What is required to create missional church culture?

As the volume of missional church literature increases, a segment of North America has grasped the apostolic impulse of the Church. Yet as books on mission. Yet as books on mission are shelved, the challenge of planting, leading, and growing missional churches remains. What is required to create missional church culture? How do we evaluate the church’s maturity as it grows? How do we create missional leaders that stay the course? In four parts, Woodward creatively addresses all of these questions. Part One lays a conceptual foundation, focusing on the meaning of culture and the necessity of leaders to become cultural architects.

Download Creating a Missional Culture: Equipping the Church for the Sake of the World.

JR Woodward offers a bold and surprisingly refreshing model for churches-not small adjustments around the . The 4 sections are entitled: The Power of Culture, A Leadership Imagination that Shapes Missional Culture, The Five Culture Creators and Embodying a Missional Culture.

JR Woodward offers a bold and surprisingly refreshing model for churches-not small adjustments around the periphery of a church's infrastructure but a radical revisioning of how a church ought to look. Visit the author's (JR Woorward) blog at jrwoodward.

Creating a Missional Culture : Equipping the Church for the Sake of the World. Once upon a time, Moses had had enough

Creating a Missional Culture : Equipping the Church for the Sake of the World. Exhausted by the challenge of leading the Israelites from slavery to the Promised Land, Moses cried out to God, "What have I done to displease you that you put the burden of all these people on me?. If this is how you are going to treat me, please go ahead and kill me" (Exodus 11:11, 15). If that sounds hauntingly familiar to you, you may be the senior pastor of a contemporary church.

Creating a Missional Culture. Equipping the Church for the Sake of the World. Forge Partnership Books. by JR Woodward Foreword by Alan Hirsch. In Creating a Missional Culture, JR Woodward offers a bold and surprisingly refreshing model for churches-not small adjustments around the periphery of a church's infrastructure but a radical revisioning of how a church ought to look, from its leadership structure to its mobilization of the laity.

Missiologist and church planter JR Woodward offers a blueprint for the missional church-not small adjustments around the periphery of the infrastructure but a radical revisioning of how a church ought to look that entails changing how we think about leadership and what w. .

Missiologist and church planter JR Woodward offers a blueprint for the missional church-not small adjustments around the periphery of the infrastructure but a radical revisioning of how a church ought to look that entails changing how we think about leadership and what we expect out of discipleship.

Once upon a time, Moses had had enough. Exhausted by the challenge of leading the Israelites from slavery to the Promised Land, Moses cried out to God, "What have I done to displease you that you put the burden of all these people on me? . . . If this is how you are going to treat me, please go ahead and kill me" (Exodus 11:11, 15). If that sounds hauntingly familiar to you, you may be the senior pastor of a contemporary church. The burden of Christian leadership is becoming increasingly unbearable--demanding skills not native to the art of pastoring; demanding time that makes sabbath rest and even normal sleep patterns seem extravagant; demanding inhuman levels of efficiency, proficiency and even saintliness. No wonder pastors seem and even feel less human these days. No wonder they burn out or break down at an alarming rate; no wonder the church is missing the mark on its mission. In Creating a Missional Culture, JR Woodward offers a bold and surprisingly refreshing model for churches--not small adjustments around the periphery of a church's infrastructure but a radical revisioning of how a church ought to look, from its leadership structure to its mobilization of the laity. The end result looks surprisingly like the church that Jesus created and the apostles cultivated: a church not chasing the wind but rather going into the world and making disciples of Jesus.
Reviews:
  • betelgeuze
This book is the best resource available to grasp and comprehend the essentials of creating a missional culture with a view to the five-fold typology (APEST). JR conveys, from experience, a robust Trinitarian, kingdom-infused, missional, incarnational approach to ecclesiology that is profound and culture-shaping for any local congregation of Christ followers. Especially impactful is the way JR exegetes our culture and lays the groundwork for us to do the same by re-imagining the church through a particular lens that enables us to live deeper into the missio dei communally. I especially appreciate how he integrated Newbiggin's missiology throughout. I've recommended this book countless times and will continue to do so as we need fresh ways to re-imagine the church through the lens of scripture in our cultural context. This is a must read for anyone who desires to see the church equipped for service for the sake of the world.

Scott Olson
Author of Re-Imagining the Church
  • Adrielmeena
JR Woodward has written a book that gets to the point and one that makes its point very well.

The point of this book is to move the church from merely an institution (although indeed it will stay an institution and that's a good thing), to a vibrant community of disciples making disciples.
The book is setup in three parts.

1. The Power of Culture
Here JR pushes the envelope to show the reader where our culture is going and how we, as the church, should not only engage in it, but create within it. JR navigates to show some of the major ways we are seeing our culture change through the "megashifts" that we are part of. As an example, how do we navigate as the church in the media shift from print and broadcast to the digital age? And so on. JR presents some compelling thoughts on how leadership must be structured, and how the church should be the foretaste of Jesus to our culture within these new megashifts, by going back to the Scriptures, not leaving them. This part 1 really gets your mind going and desiring to hear JR's conclusion. Exactly what Part 1 of a book should do.

2. A Leadership Imagination That Shapes Missional Culture
While JR gives you some overall examples of leadership that he believes will not only engage our culture, but also be Scripturally based, he now moves on to the specifics of the megashifts and how we must now look to engage this as the church. He shows how our leadership Structure is actually making a theological statement to the world (and each other) and how much we truly desire to engage the world. Not only that, but makes the case that we must change (or really go back to our roots found in Paul and Jesus) or we won't actually engage the world in the most compelling God glorifying ways. He really starts down this road to nail down what he is meaning as he starts in with his ideas of polycentric leadership. Meaning, leadership that is decentralized, yet still leading, not merely having a bunch of people running rampant with no leaders in place. I believe this is one of the major things the church needs to take note of. We need to hear what JR is saying here if we desire to multiply disciples, instead of merely multiplying church buildings and services. He shows how polycentric leadership works in a myriad of places, such as politics and business. The understanding of this is that the people feel empowered to be led by the Spirit and part of the whole without having to continually "check in" to make sure the powers that be are in agreement with the Spirit.

He states it in this way:
The apostle Paul was ahead of his time, for he does not propose a centralized leadership structure or a flat leadership structure. Rather he reveals to us a polycentric structure, where leaders interrelate and incarnate the various purposes of Christ in such a way that the entire body is activated to service and matures in love.

This chapter of JR's book needs to be read over and over again as the church moves forward as a multiplying movement of disciple makers.

3. The Five Culture Creators
For the final part, JR now gives you full handles on what he is speaking on, with Ephesians 4 being his anchor for discussion. He lays out what it looks like to have each of the culture creators working together and what each of them embodies. They are laid out as the Scriptures lay them out for us in Apostles, Prophets, Evangelists, Shepherds and Teachers. While JR further contextualizes each one of these with his own descriptor, the task of giving his insight to what each one does is very helpful. Not only does he give descriptors and stories, but he also adds at the end, questions, to reveal which culture creator you most likely represent.
This third part, is very helpful and one that will aid anyone that is looking to transition their leadership structure in the way that is described in Ephesians 4.

Overall, this book is very well done. After speaking further to JR, I learned that this is something that isn't merely theory for him, but one that he has been studying for over 12 years and actually practicing for the past 10 years.
The book leans heavily on the power of the Spirit and the insight given to us by the Scriptures and also those outside the Scriptures. Many helpful quotes come alongside JR's extensive research and helpful articulations of his end goal.
What JR does not do, and I am totally fine with it, is try and persuade you to believe in the Ephesians 4 5 fold ministry from a theological, exegetical framework. It seems as though he is leaving that argumentation to Alan Hirsch and Tim Catchim with The Permanent Revolution.

Again, because he does this, he is able to get to the point for the audience he is aiming for. He is aiming for those of us who are on the missional edge knowing that we have been missing something. Knowing something within our leadership structures and methods of engagement is off.

In the end, the reader comes away with a book that pushes them in these ways:
- Be led by the Spirit
- Leaders are true equippers, not saviors for their church
- Leaders become servants, not lords
- Our methods should be derived from the Scriptures, yet not ignoring the cultures we are sent to
- We will be evaluated by one thing: our disciples...are we making them?

By returning us to a polycentric, 5 fold ministry of equippers for the church for the sake of God, JR allows Jesus' words in Matthew 16:18 to be believable for us today:
And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it.

I recommend this to anyone looking to be the church to the culture they are sent to. But don't just read the book and do nothing about it. Read the book with the expectation of making changes, by the power and wisdom of the Spirit, so that disciples are made to the ends of the earth.

You can win a signed copy of this book. Details found here: [...]
  • Yainai
Woodward brings his understanding of culture and how it is formed together with his passion for the church to see her flourish and be sent out into God's mission.

He begins the book by laying a groundwork for how culture is formed. He says that every culture has six elements: language, artifacts, rituals, narratives, ethics, and institutions. Together, these elements form a "culture web" that shapes and forms those who belong to that culture. Then looking at Ephesians 4, Woodward sees the "equippers" - apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers - as God-given leaders who help cultivate a missional culture. They are cultural environmentalists that take give shape and space where the fruits of Christ can grow wild.

In the middle section Woodward spends a chapter on each of the five equippers with descriptive analysis of each equipper's concerns, passions, weaknesses, and effects. This section can be helpful for groups to hear and self-identify or for people in a small group to name what they see in others.

Woodward ties the culture-building piece with the equipper piece together with some concrete suggestions and models for churches. He uses the analogy of a player-coach to distinguish people who have a gift or orientation toward one of the five gifts and people who are called and affirmed by a faith community to equip others to live into their passion and gift. He names the latter as player-coaches - people who still are "in the game" and living out their gifting in the world and the church but who have moved into a season of life where they are spending more time "coaching" others. He then incorporates the models of apprenticeship and guilds as ways that people are equipped and flourish in their gifting for the church and for God's mission in the world.

The most important concept that I took away from this book was the importance of polycentric leadership that isn't heirarchical or autocratic but it isn't flat leadership either. He notes that our models are not neutral. They have a theology and communicate our values and ethics. A polycentric model of leadership is best suited for the priesthood of all believers while maintaing openness to the Spirit's wind-blowing leadership.

I trust JR Woodward's work here because I know that he is a practitioner, a widely-read and careful thinker, who is passionate about God's mission and the church. I highly commend this book to anyone who is wondering how to cultivate "thriving, liberating, welcoming, healing, and learning environments" in their church.