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The Rush That Never Ended: History of Australian Mining download ebook

by Geoffrey Blainey

The Rush That Never Ended: History of Australian Mining download ebook
ISBN:
0522839290
ISBN13:
978-0522839296
Author:
Geoffrey Blainey
Publisher:
Melbourne University Press; 2nd edition (April 1970)
Language:
Pages:
399 pages
ePUB:
1467 kb
Fb2:
1529 kb
Other formats:
txt lit azw mobi
Category:
Industries
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

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This book details the history of Australian Mining, but don't be put off by the seemingly dry subject-it is anything . Black boulders, which cattle shied from, formed a low hill in the ranges. There was a gold rush a few miles away, but nobody thought to test the black hill, as the rocks were all wrong.

This book details the history of Australian Mining, but don't be put off by the seemingly dry subject-it is anything but dry. Stories are told of the romantic gold rushes, the lucky, the unlucky, the schemes, plots, the deceptions, the clouded histories, the despair of the many, and the fortune of the fe. Farmers sold the useless land the cattle didn't like. A lazy miner was sacked from his job, his wife pleaded for his re-employment, in return for the locale of a "silver mine" in the hills.

Geoffrey Norman Blainey AC is a prominent Australian historian

with the majority of that being the in the 1800's. Only the last 20 pages or so really touch on more modern deposits, and very brief coverage is given to each site. My desire to learn more about Australia is blooming, especially as we consider going there to work. Geoffrey Norman Blainey AC is a prominent Australian historian. He attended Wesley College and the University of Melbourne.

Silent Partners Step 8: Riskese Step 9: History Stock Exchange Stock Market Stock Market Crash of 1720 Stock Market Crash of 1929 . Author: Geoffrey Blainey. Publisher: Melbourne University Press.

Silent Partners Step 8: Riskese Step 9: History Stock Exchange Stock Market Stock Market Crash of 1720 Stock Market Crash of 1929 Stock Picking Stocks Technical Analysis Wall Street. Starting .

The Rush That Never Ended: A History of Australian Mining. Parkville, Melbourne University Press, 1963.

The Rush That Never Ended: A History of Australian Mining, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, Vic . Blainey, Eye on Australia: Speeches and Essays of Geoffrey Blainey, Schwartz Books, Melbourne, Vi. 1991. Jumping Over the Wheel, Allen & Unwin, St. Leonards, .

The Rush That Never Ended: A History of Australian Mining, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, Vi. 1963. A History of Camberwell, Jacaranda Press in association with the Camberwell City Council, Brisbane, 1964. Tyranny of Distance: How Distance Shaped Australia's History, Sun Books, Melbourne, Vi. 1966. Winner of the C. Weickhardt award for Australian literature. The Golden Mile, Allen & Unwin, St. Leonards, 1993.

The Australian landscape is littered with mines

The Australian landscape is littered with mines. This text tells the story of Australia's mineral discoveries, describes the giants of its mining history and records the tremendous influence that mining has had on its attitudes to unionism, religion, law and politics. Read associated article: Avoca, Victoria.

Geoffrey Blainey, The Rush that Never Ended: A history of Australian mining (Carlton 2003). Powell, A Far Country. Blainey, The Rush that Never Ended. Evans, A History of Queensland. Reynolds, North of Capricorn. Geoffrey Bolton, Land of Vision and Mirage: Western Australia since 1826 (Perth 2008). Geoffrey Blainey, The Peaks of Lyell (Melbourne 1978). Battye, A History of Western Australia from its Discovery to the Inauguration of the Commonwealth (Project Gutenberg Australia electronic book, originally published 1924). Social bandits ii. John Molony, Ned Kelly (Carlton 2001).

Economic literature: papers, articles, software, chapters, books. Handle: RePEc:cup:buhirw:v:38:y:1964:i:03:p:393-395 01.

Reviews:
  • Ironrunner
Educational and engaging. Couldn't put this one down. Blaine does a great job of covering the history of mining in Australia through an evolving story that keeps the reader interested.
  • Dalallador
This book details the history of Australian Mining, but don't be put off by the seemingly dry subject-it is anything but dry. Stories are told of the romantic gold rushes, the lucky, the unlucky, the schemes, plots, the deceptions, the clouded histories, the despair of the many, and the fortune of the few. For students of both human nature and history it has interesting insights, such as how plain luck plays a significant part in human events, and how apparently small innocuous irrelevancies can lead to profound outcomes.
An interesting example is that of the Mount Morgan Mine in Queensland. Black boulders, which cattle shied from, formed a low hill in the ranges. There was a gold rush a few miles away, but nobody thought to test the black hill, as the rocks were all wrong. Farmers sold the useless land the cattle didn't like. A lazy miner was sacked from his job, his wife pleaded for his re-employment, in return for the locale of a "silver mine" in the hills. A few savvy mine managers wandered into a black innocuous hill. They chipped away, took out leases over the whole hill (a wise move), kept it very quiet (another wise move). When samples were broken, there was more gold than black earth-it was assumed it wasn't gold but something else. They began to mine quietly away until a local newspaper noticed there was a phenomenal amount of gold leaving a nearby town. The word was out. Mount Morgan -the "freak lode" as described by geologists at the time-became one of the richest and mightiest gold mines on earth. It defied virtually everything known about gold mines at the time. Geologists were perplexed, but as long as shares repaid 413,000% of their value, the owners didn't care. The copper that got "in the way" of gold processing eventually amounted to about 250,000t of copper. It was mined for around 100 years, and money that came from the mine was used to find oil in the Middle East, which eventually formed the company BP. Mine owners declared in World War 1, that Mount Morgan money was used to fight the Germans. In the 1950s over half of Great Britain's revenue came from oil discoveries that were originally financed by one small black hill in the outback of Australia.
The world's largest resource of lead and zinc-the Broken Hill Lode-is another case in point. For some years in the 1800s a large, jagged hill of black boulders more than a mile long and 500 feet wide was ignored by local prospectors at the nearby silver rushes at Silverton. A surveyor's fence was put across it. A trig station crowned the summit. Samples were chipped which came back high in uninteresting lead, but little else. It wasn't near any main thoroughfares. The owner of the land wasn't interested in prospectors. It was too big to be a lode. A good lode was said to be five feet wide, Broken Hill was over 500 feet wide. The rocks were wrong. So numerous hopefuls mined the molehills, whilst the mountain was ignored.
When people finally got around to examining it, a few speculators bought and sold shares, making a few bucks, as the hill guarded its riches. Finally, when a shaft was sunk on the wrong rock type-white kaolin-bonanza silver assays came back and the hill was born. The first 48 tons produced about 36,000oz of silver, which in the 1880s, was a lot of dough. The ensuing stock market mania and mining development transformed Australian history. Over $AUS 70 billion has been taken from the hill to the 1990s.
There are many other similar tales, twists and turns- the vagaries and tides of history. Curiously and well written, it is recommended for those interested in history, particularly Australian, or those simply interested in curious human anecdotes of life.