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25 Investment Classics: Insights from the Greatest Investment Books of All Time download ebook

by Leo Gough

25 Investment Classics: Insights from the Greatest Investment Books of All Time download ebook
ISBN:
0273632442
ISBN13:
978-0273632443
Author:
Leo Gough
Publisher:
Financial Times/Prentice Hall (January 25, 1999)
Language:
Pages:
256 pages
ePUB:
1178 kb
Fb2:
1355 kb
Other formats:
doc lrf txt mbr
Category:
Economics
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

The author, Leo Gough, covers various investment methods

The author, Leo Gough, covers various investment methods. You don’t get to be popular by appearing to be extremely smart-you have to dumb down to be like. ut I fear that Soros is doomed to remain a misunderstood ire-the Lex Luthor of our age (. 01)

25 Investment Classics book. There are certain books that have earned a place in investment history: old masters and modern classics that have made the greatest contributions to the world's store of investment know-how.

25 Investment Classics book. 25 Investment Classics brings together, in one volume, and invaluable guide to the best investment writing of all time.

Great Summary of Investment Classics. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago. This book is just that.

This book brings together in one volume the best investment writing of all time; texts that have shaped, and continue to shape, the foundations of investment wisdom including grand masters such as Benjamin Graham and Warren Buffett. Great Summary of Investment Classics. an excellent summary of investment classics, and it is easy to read and absorb.

There are certain books that have earned a place in investment history: old masters and modern classics that have made the greatest contributions to the world's store of investment know-how. It defines and introduces these classic texts that have shaped, and continue to shape, the foundation of investment wisdom.

Malkiel’s book includes some handy definitions of investment terms, and it applies them to. .

Malkiel’s book includes some handy definitions of investment terms, and it applies them to various investment strategies geared toward different stages in life. The New York Times says the book is surprisingly moving.

25 Investment Classics: Insights from the Greatest Investment Books of All Time. Leo Gough, Financial Times business Ltd. 1999. There are certain books that have earned a place in investment history; old masters and modern classics alike which, word for word, page for page, have made the greatest contributions to the world'. More).

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This investment book is believed to be the smoothest investment reading ever and is expected to free the reader from the complex investment terminology while providing precise advice to intelligent investing. In all, the book enables the reader to take complete financial control of one’s investment portfolio while strategically advising him to make impressive stock market returns. lt;< Get this book . – Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever. Key Takeaways from This Best Investment Book of All Time. America’s top money manager explains how an average investor possesses the power to successfully beat the positives by leveraging their know-how.

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From the Inside Flap. John C. Bogle is the investment visionary who founded the Vanguard Group. In this candid book, he reveals his insights on finance, economics, mutual funds, stewardship, and idealism. John Bogle on Investing: The First 50 Years includes his essays spanning the first 50 years of his legendary career, beginning with his landmark Princeton University senior thesis, "The Economic Role of the Investment Company.

The book concludes with ten simple rules that will help investors meet their financial goals. Here, he presents a common sense strategy that "may not be the best strategy ever devised. But the number of strategies that are worse is infinite. The Clash of the Cultures: Investment vs. Speculation completes the trilogy of best-selling books, beginning with Bogle on Investing: The First 50 Years (2001) and Don't Count on It! (2011). The Classic Text Annotated to Update Graham's Timeless Wisdom for Today's Market Conditions The greatest investment advisor of the twentieth century, Benjamin Graham taught and inspired people worldwide.

For each of the 25 books, Leo Gough offers a revealing account of the author's life and work, explains the book's key lessons for investors, assesses its impact on the investing world, and suggests how its advice can be best put to work. Some of the books included are from grand masters such as Grahan & Dodd, W.D. Gann, Charles McKay and Edwin Le Fevre. Latter day legends include Warren Buffett, George Soros and Peter Lynch and the sharpest observers of life in the markets such as Michael Lewis, Tom Wolfs and Adam Smith.
Reviews:
  • Zyniam
Just what I was looking for.
  • Chi
I appreciate what the author was trying to do with this book, introducing us to his own list of the 25 best investment books of all time. Although I am no worse for the wear after having read this volume, the exercise left me somewhat dissatisfied upon reflection.
The collection of books is haphazard, looking at areas of the market and investing that are widely dispersed. This is not a weakness in itself, but the disjointed way the author jumps from work to work with no transition gives this volume the flavor of reading a stack of unorganized book reviews. The writing quality is not terrible, but it does not hold attention well and could have used some serious editing in places. The book's main strength is its brief distillations of the 25 works it covers.
The author, a financial journalist, provides no evidence of any special competence or authority in any of the subjects he covers. This is a significant contrast to a work like Dean LeBaron's Treasury of Investment Wisdom, where Mr. LeBaron brings a lot of expertise in various areas and makes no bones about where he stands on various topics.
One quote that stood out for me near the end of the book was the following (p. 207):
"...He (Wittgenstein) was ever conscious of our inability to be certain. This is one of the great existential riddles, and I have every sympathy with the majority of people, who feel uncomfortable at this thought and prefer to find refuge in the arms of any number of ideologies and belief systems."
No, Wittgenstein is not one of the 25 authors covered among the investment classics (for an exact list, check the book's editorial reviews in detail). Wittgenstein is simply a manifestation of the author's wishy-washiness. He does not believe in technical analysis, is not quite sure he believes in fundamental analysis, and does not appear to have any shockingly special insights on these works.
Because some of the books he covers are very good, the wisdom of the 25 authors cannot help but affect you, no matter how buried in the author's prose. The few direct quotes from works that he inserts provided the fresh breaths of air I needed to keep going through these pages.
Hopefully digesting this book will inspire the reader to read the underlying "25 Investment Classics", which will be ultimately much more rewarding.
  • Danial
I believe this is a good book for beginners seeking investment advice. If you are an investment professional who is well read, this book isn't for you. In this book the author tries to briefly describe each book and the relevant points of each book, with some excerpts taken from each.
He is very negative on technical analysis (the author), as his tone and comments about this form of analysis is negative throughout the book. I personally find this very distasteful as technical analysis would have bailed you out of the market at most of its peaks (when money flows turned negative - it did in telecom service in April 2000)
I do believe the wide array of books utilized is a very good collection for a beginner. Some other good books, which actually talk to individuals is Market Wizards : Interviews With Top Traders by Jack D. Schwager and John Train's Money Master and New Money Masters (2 different books). I believe everyone should read Peter Lynch's first book, Beating the Street. A good book on managing your money is Suze Orman's 9 Steps to Financial Freedom
Having worked with portfolio managers as a research analyst I hope this helps everyone.
  • Orll
Although written over 10 years ago, much wisdom can still be extracted from '25 Investment Classics.' I assume for this to be true 10, even 20 years from now. Classics are classics for a reason-- they have valuable insights and are timeless. In a sea of investment literature, Gough boils it down to what he deems the 25 most valuable.

Most business readers will have probably already read or heard of many of the books. Books such as A Random Walk Down Wall Street: Completely Revised and Updated Edition and The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing. A Book of Practical Counsel (Revised Edition) are found here, as well as others that go back decades, even centuries.

Each classic is summed up in about 5-10 pages. This is good and bad. It lets you get an idea and the main points, but there is something to reading the original text in its entirety. That said, this should be apart of your business library, not your ENTIRE business library.

'25' is good, but could use less opinion from the other. Author Tom Butler-Bowden does a fine job writing clear and concise summaries, such as 50 Prosperity Classics: Attract It, Create It, Manage It, Share It (50 Classics) which lays out a books main points and lets the reader decide their opinion.
  • Kearanny
"25 Investment Classics" distills the knowledge of some classic investment books into bite-sized pieces. Gough explains the books involved, why the book in question is significant, and also offers his own critique of the investment classic under review. I did not give this book five stars because I disagreed with some of Gough's choices (I never thought of "The Art of Short Selling" as a classic). I was also disappointed by Gough's apparent contempt for technical analysis. Although there are plenty of concepts in technical analysis that are bogus, I do not think that the whole field is bunk. This is light reading for the lover of investing and trading books.
  • Gozragore
I appreciate Mr. Gough's book for the valuable insight offered by the 25 "masters" of finance. Indeed it is his choice of experts and his obvious appreciation for their accumen, moxie and well yes, success that makes this book a good read. Mr. Gough has a fine, clear writing style and we leave the book a bit smarter and perhaps a bit more interested in some of his muses. I recommend it!!
  • Adrielmeena
This book is just that . . . an excellent summary of investment classics, and it is easy to read and absorb. It makes it easy to select a short list of what you intend to read based upon the synopsis presented.