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The Impact of Genetically Engineered Crops on Farm Sustainability in the United States download ebook

by National Research Council,Division on Earth and Life Studies,Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources,Committee on the Impact of Biotechnology on Farm-Level Economics and Sustainability

The Impact of Genetically Engineered Crops on Farm Sustainability in the United States download ebook
ISBN:
0309147085
ISBN13:
978-0309147088
Author:
National Research Council,Division on Earth and Life Studies,Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources,Committee on the Impact of Biotechnology on Farm-Level Economics and Sustainability
Publisher:
National Academies Press (August 26, 2010)
Language:
Pages:
270 pages
ePUB:
1518 kb
Fb2:
1366 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr lrf lit
Category:
Economics
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

However, The Impact of Genetically Engineered Crops on Farm Sustainability in the United States is the first comprehensive assessment of the environmental, economic, and social impacts of the GE-crop revolution on .

However, The Impact of Genetically Engineered Crops on Farm Sustainability in the United States is the first comprehensive assessment of the environmental, economic, and social impacts of the GE-crop revolution on . It addresses how GE crops have affected . farmers, both adopters and nonadopters of the technology, their incomes, agronomic practices, production decisions, environmental resources, and personal well-being.

Committee on the Impact of Biotechnology on Farm-Level Economics and Sustainability

Committee on the Impact of Biotechnology on Farm-Level Economics and Sustainability. Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. Division on Earth and Life Studies. The national academies press.

level sustainability in terms of environmental . Department of Agriculture; Raymond A. Jussaume, Washington State University, Pullman; Michele C. Marra, North Carolina State University; Micheal D. K. Owen, Iowa State.

Anonymous 2010 Nevertheless, the final conclusion states that the United States economy greatly benefits from the using broadly genetically B. .

Impact of Genetically Engineered Crops on Farm Sustainability in the United States. The National Academy Press, Washington . Nevertheless, the final conclusion states that the United States economy greatly benefits from the using broadly genetically BT engineered crops in the na-tional and world economy.

Genetically Engineered Crops Benefit Many Farmers, But The . Studies also should examine impacts on industries that rely on GE products, such as the livestock industry. Committee on the Impact of Biotechnology on Farm-Level Economics and Sustainability.

Genetically Engineered Crops Benefit Many Farmers, But The Technology Needs Proper Management to Remain Effective. WASHINGTON - Many .

Genetically Engineering Crops Nationwide acreage of GE soybean, corn, and cotton as a percentage of all acreage .

Genetically Engineering Crops Nationwide acreage of GE soybean, corn, and cotton as a percentage of all acreage of these crops Source: USDA-NASS (2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009b). GE Crops Analyzed in the Report, Soybeans, Herbicide resistance, Corn, Herbicide resistance, Insect resistance, Cotton, Herbicide resistance, Insect resistance.

The Impact of GE Crops at the Farm Level A starting point for analyzing the . The highest price increase in the United States has been in cotton

The Impact of GE Crops at the Farm Level A starting point for analyzing the impact of IR traits is the damage control function approach of Lichtenberg and Zilberman (1986). Actual crop output is given to be equal to potential output minus pest damage. The highest price increase in the United States has been in cotton. On the other hand, livestock producers in the United States and around the world have significantly benefited from the adoption of GM varieties.

Committee on Genetically Engineered Crops: Past Experience and Future Prospects, Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Engineering National Academies of Sciences, and Medicine. Publisher(s): national academies press. CitationNational Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Genetically engineered (GE) crops were first introduced commercially in the 1990s.

Study the environmental, economic, and social impacts of genetically engineered (GE) crops on .

Impact of Biotechnology on Farm-Level Economics. and Division on Earth and Life Studies 2002). A recent study indicates that the economic benets resulting from Bt corn are not limited to growers of the genetically engineered crop (Hutchison et al. 2010)

Impact of Biotechnology on Farm-Level Economics. 2010). In 2009, Bt corn was planted o. 2. 2 million hectares, constituting 63% of the .

Since genetically engineered (GE) crops were introduced in 1996, their use in the United States has grown rapidly, accounting for 80-90 percent of soybean, corn, and cotton acreage in 2009. To date, crops with traits that provide resistance to some herbicides and to specific insect pests have benefited adopting farmers by reducing crop losses to insect damage, by increasing flexibility in time management, and by facilitating the use of more environmentally friendly pesticides and tillage practices. However, excessive reliance on a single technology combined with a lack of diverse farming practices could undermine the economic and environmental gains from these GE crops. Other challenges could hinder the application of the technology to a broader spectrum of crops and uses. Several reports from the National Research Council have addressed the effects of GE crops on the environment and on human health. However, The Impact of Genetically Engineered Crops on Farm Sustainability in the United States is the first comprehensive assessment of the environmental, economic, and social impacts of the GE-crop revolution on U.S. farms. It addresses how GE crops have affected U.S. farmers, both adopters and nonadopters of the technology, their incomes, agronomic practices, production decisions, environmental resources, and personal well-being. The book offers several new findings and four recommendations that could be useful to farmers, industry, science organizations, policy makers, and others in government agencies.