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Other People's Money: And How The Bankers Use It download ebook

by Louis D. Brandeis,Norman Hapgood

Other People's Money: And How The Bankers Use It download ebook
ISBN:
1432686038
ISBN13:
978-1432686031
Author:
Louis D. Brandeis,Norman Hapgood
Publisher:
Kessinger Publishing, LLC (June 25, 2007)
Language:
Pages:
204 pages
ePUB:
1868 kb
Fb2:
1683 kb
Other formats:
doc mbr azw mobi
Category:
Economics
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

Other People's Money And How the Bankers Use It (1914) is a collection of essays written by Louis Brandeis first published as a book in 1914, and reissued in 1933.

Other People's Money And How the Bankers Use It (1914) is a collection of essays written by Louis Brandeis first published as a book in 1914, and reissued in 1933. All the chapters of the book appeared as articles in Harper's Weekly between 22 November 1913 and 17 January 1914, and were written before November 1913. Our Financial Oligarchy. How the Combiners Combine. Interlocking Directorates. Serve One Master Only! What Publicity Can Do. Where the Banker is Superfluous. Big Men and Little Business.

The inquiries meant that the attentive public recognized that here was a contribution to history. Here was the clearest and most profound.

Other People's Money book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Other People's Money: And How The Bankers Use It as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Other People's Money And. has been added to your Cart. Louis D. Brandeis showcases his genius when analyzing how the money trust controlled many industries in the United States during the beginning of the 20th century. The interlocking directorates, the acquisition of related corporations, such as insurance companies, money trusts and investment banks, made commercial banks the most powerful institutions of the economy in the United States.

BACK in 1913 Louis D. Brandeis, not yet a member of the Supreme Court, took the information gleaned from the Pujo investigation of the so-called "money trust" and wrote a startling little book, "Other People's Money and How the Bankers Use I. View Full Article in Timesmachine .

BACK in 1913 Louis D. Advertisement. Go to Home Page . news.

Louis D Brandeis, Norman Hapgood.

Even without such urgence through the mail, however, it would have been.

You can also read the full text online using our ereader

You can also read the full text online using our ereader. A denunciation of trusts and investment banking, this book helped inspire important antitrust legislation. le men possessed of large fortunes; but the most potent factor in their control of business is not the possession of extraordinary ability or huge wealth. Brandeis was a Supreme Court Justice, a patriot and a genius, he wrote "Other People's Money and How Bankers Use It" to warn the american public about the shadowy banking cabal that controls the United States. Upvote (0). Downvote (0).

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Reviews:
  • Anayaron
Brandeis' writings are impeccable and instructive - without contest. This printing, however, is awful. It is obvious that the books was scanned and OCR performed because of the obvious errors in the book; and there are many. Examples: onl},'afhiliations, ObviousIj' only a few of (ho invest nitrite bickers oxorrisc this Krcat power. Anyone with experience in OCR would recognize these common errors.
  • Nalmergas
A must read for anyone who questions the necessity of our fractional reserve fiat monetary system. More relevant today than when written in 1914 for one simple reason...the Federal Reserve was only just beginning then, and the bankers' global fiat monetary system was not yet unleashed upon the world. Yet even with their somewhat limited powers, as compared to today, the bankers of that day still had an amazingly large and adverse impact on our free market economic system. Brandeis's analysis of the monopolistic money trust is incredible and deserves 5 stars all by itself. He was truly a brilliant man, and an incorruptible champion of the people. That being said, what held me back to 4 stars is the progressive big government solutions he championed. The impact that this brilliant and incorruptible man had on the justification for big government as the check on the power of the money trust cannot be underestimated. Sadly, even though many see themselves capable of the greatness of a Brandeis, very few are. And greatness was what was needed to carry out the progressive big government solutions he championed. Given the current state of the bankers' monetary system, even after the mega-trillion dollar bailouts and "quantitative easing" funded by savers alive and savers not yet born, clearly what came after Brandeis was not greatness, but hubris --- and a highly compensated, morally bankrupt, deceptive, and corrupt hubris at that.

It's worth repeating that Brandeis's analysis, especially his analysis on wave after wave of purposeless business consolidation and the failures of banker management, was absolutely brilliant. Multiply what he wrote about the money trust and the monopolies they created back then by about a thousand, and you get a general idea of the trouble we face today in breaking the death grip the money trust and their political enablers have on our economic and political freedom.
  • Auridora
I have been reading dozens of books within the past 2 years on investing and the stock market / US business history. I read this book after Galbraith's The Great Crash 1929 [really excellent!] and am currently reading Josephson's The Robber Barons [also excellent]. All three of these books are over 50 years old, and can seem dated in their prose style [not a problem for me - maybe since I am also over 50], but the material is very fresh and timely, if a bit depressing. The rigging of our financial system to fleece the many in favor of the few did not start in the dot.com era or with the junk bond kings.

I highly recommend the edition of Other People's Money edited by Urofsky because his introduction adds a great deal to this slim volume which began life as a series of even shorter magazine articles.

Overall, Distressingly familiar [even many of the names have not changed after 100 years]!
  • Azago
I had to read this for an Econ History class. While it is not a hard read, attempting to cite this is a nightmare. The product details says it is published by CrateSpace Feb 20, 2009, my copy says "Seven Treasures Publications, copy write 2009" no city, no other information, and I cannot find it on google. On the back it says "Made in Lexington, KY 25 March 2018" (when I ordered it). Wish I got a copy from somewhere else. I have not run into the OCR/ typos as other people have though.
  • Love Me
Louis D. Brandeis showcases his genius when analyzing how the money trust controlled many industries in the United States during the beginning of the 20th century. The interlocking directorates, the acquisition of related corporations, such as insurance companies, money trusts and investment banks, made commercial banks the most powerful institutions of the economy in the United States.
  • Bad Sunny
Although written a hundred years ago, this book provides a scholarly explanation of Bernie Sanders' 2016 campaign philosophy. Brandeis argues eloquently for separating investment and traditional banking, and he provides historical background to support his argument that the investment banks concentrated too much capital (the "Money Trust"), and that this is dangerous for America. Other People's Money provides useful context to understand the current debate about the proper role of Wall Street in the American economy.
  • Foiuost
it should be taught in high school, along with government 101. this is one of those books that effectively gives the layman an understanding of American banking history from a source that not trying to grind out a best seller.
Entirely relevant today. Yes, get it. As a gift, for yourself...