cerkalo
» » A Certain Slant of Light: The First Hundred Years of New England Phototgraphy

A Certain Slant of Light: The First Hundred Years of New England Phototgraphy download ebook

by William F. Robinson

A Certain Slant of Light: The First Hundred Years of New England Phototgraphy download ebook
ISBN:
0821207520
ISBN13:
978-0821207529
Author:
William F. Robinson
Publisher:
New York Graphic Society; 1ST edition (September 26, 1980)
Language:
Pages:
243 pages
ePUB:
1768 kb
Fb2:
1145 kb
Other formats:
doc lit mbr lrf
Category:
Photography & Video
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

Dust jacket notes: New England's 'certain slant of light' has captivated not only Emily Dickinson and generations of other beloved poets and painters but also a. .A very good book about the history of photography in New England. The copy that I received was in very good condition.

Dust jacket notes: New England's 'certain slant of light' has captivated not only Emily Dickinson and generations of other beloved poets and painters but also a long line of distinguised photographers. How and why these men and women aimed their cameras at the people.

Robinson, William . 1946-; New York Graphic Society. New York Graphic Society. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

A Certain Slant Of Light book. by William F. Robinson. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Home Robinson, William F. A Certain Slant of Light: The First Hundred . Mullen Books maintains a very active computerized inventory which grows by 2-300 titles per week. A Certain Slant of Light: The First Hundred Years of New England. Discusses cultural and scientific history in New England from 1839-1950, covering the topics of medicine, meteorology, and astronomy, as well as photography. Bookseller Inventory 107897. Ask Seller a Question. Our specialties include the Humanities, with an emphasis on Art, Architecture, Photography, Decorative Arts, History, Periodicals related to those areas. We have very rare as well as fairly common titles.

The photographer's eye. John Szarkowski. Diana & nikon: essays on the aesthetics of photography. Robert H. Getscher, "A CERTAIN SLANT OF LIGHT: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF NEW ENGLAND PHOTOGRAPHY. William F. Robinson THE PHOTOGRAPHER'S EYE. John Szarkowski DIANA & NIKON: ESSAYS ON THE AESTHETICS OF PHOTOGRAPHY. Janet Malcolm," ARLIS/NA Newsletter 9, no. 1 (DECEMBER 1980): 28-29.

William Robinson, author of ''A Certain Slant of Light: The First Hundred Years of New England Photography,'' will serve as moderator

William Robinson, author of ''A Certain Slant of Light: The First Hundred Years of New England Photography,'' will serve as moderator. Panel members include Alan Trachtenberg of Yale, Roger Watson of the George Eastman House Museum, Lucy Bowditch of the College of St. Rose, and Matthew Isenberg, a collector and author. The method of producing images without a negative, invented in 1839, was chosen by Augustus Washington as his life's work. Out of some 49 of his daguerreotypes believed to be in existence, 33 are in the exhibition

Personal Name: Robinson, William . 1946-. New York Graphic Society, (c)1980.

Personal Name: Robinson, William . Physical Description: 243 p. : ill. ;, 26 cm.

Robinson, William F. A Certain Slant of Light: The First Hundred Years of New England Photography. Boston: New York Graphic Society, 1980. p. 59. Naef, Weston J. Counterparts: Form and Emotion in Photographs. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1982. no. 16. Pierce, Sally. Whipple and Black: Commercial Photographers in Boston. Boston: Boston Athenaeum, 1987. Timeline of Art History. Essays The Daguerreian Era and Early American Photography on Paper, 1839-1860. Timelines The United States and Canada, 1800-1900 .

A Certain Slant of Light is a 2005 young adult horror novel by author Laura Whitcomb. The book was first published on September 21, 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt's Graphia imprint. Film rights for A Certain Slant of Light have been optioned by Summit Entertainment. The title is derived from the first line of "There's a certain Slant of light," a poem by Emily Dickinson.

In a certain slant of light, I think I am trying on widowhood and old age with the Mrs Portman character, and .

In a certain slant of light, I think I am trying on widowhood and old age with the Mrs Portman character, and the eccentric down-at-heel, flamboyant carefree character of Miss Warre. I like the work to sit on the line between psychologically disturbing and a little bit funny, which means that it can all fall apart if all the elements do not align. The first series of Top of the Lake written and directed by Jane Campion is an absolutely wonderful, dark critique of what motherhood is - or might be - shot in the hour after dusk in incredible New Zealand landscape bathed in beautiful, soft, barely-there blue light. As for music, Underworld’s album Everything, Everything.

125 black-and-white illustrations. Dust jacket notes: "New England's 'certain slant of light' has captivated not only Emily Dickinson and generations of other beloved poets and painters but also a long line of distinguised photographers. How and why these men and women aimed their cameras at the people, places, and ways of life in New England is the theme of this book. They were a mixed lot - tinkerers and doctors, astronomers and socialites, housewives and mountain men, balloonists and reformers, with a few con men and crackpots for good measure. Their work, as diverse as their backgrounds and motives, also mirrors the astonishing variety and leadership of this tiny region. Rich in anecdote and fresh insights into New England's cultural and scientific history from 1839 to 1950, A Certain Slant of Light chronicles firsts in medical, astronomical, aerial, meteorological, and high-speed photography. It treats many kinds of documentary photography, ranging from one man's lifelong portrait of Walden Pond to the pictures of urban poverty that led to America's first housing project. It discusses reclusive amateurs whose genius lay unrecognized during their lifetimes, and professionals who turned the photography of New England into a lucrative industry. Many great names are here - among them Southworth and Hawes, John Adams Whipple, Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Wallace Black, Lewis Hine, Charles H. Currier, Chansonetta Stanley Emmons, Herbert W. Gleason, Fred Holland Day, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Ralph Steiner, the Farm Security Administration photographers, Ernst Halberstadt, Harold Edgerton, Wallace Nutting, Samuel Chamberlain, Walker Evans, and Paul Strand. But Mr. Robinson goes beyond the masters, paying homage also to many unsung photographers who made quiet, often anonymous, but just as clear-sighted and memorable images that say, 'Here is New England.'"
Reviews:
  • Arryar
A very good book about the history of photography in New England.
The copy that I received was in very good condition.
  • Goltizuru
I came across the book while purging my book shelves for books to donate to the
Boston Public Library. It's a volume that's been around for some years, but like a fine wine, it has aged well. I'd bought it years ago, but not bothered to read it until I rediscovered it. I'm glad I rediscovered this excellent history book because the information contained within its pages remains accurate and well written. And I'm also more able to appreciate the history.
Recently, I finished writing a local history book about Boston's Notable Addresses and the residents who made those addresses famous. While I knew about the photographic contributions of poet Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, F. Holland Day and Dr. Harold Edgerton, I had no inkling that Edward Everett Hale (author of "Man Without a Country"), who is also included in my book made major contributions to the history of photography. I wish I'd found this book a little earlier because I would have added an interesting side light to my own Boston history book.
Boston played a much more important role in the history of Photography than is generally known. "The finest daguerreotypists in America, and perhaps the world, could be found at this time in Boston. Here resided artists, experimenters, and innovators; here were made some of the greatest images ever to be preserved on the daguerreotype plate. By 1850 the city boasted twenty-five major galleries along Tremont Row and Washington Street." The typical New Englander at the time was a tinkerer that loved to invent and improve anything he touched.
"At the same time, new and intriguing subjects for the camera were being created by New England's inventors and backroom tinkerers. These figures worked, over the years, at improving the photographic process and adapting it to new, usually practical, ends. Above all else, this has been the region's strongest contribution to the craft of photography. Here, for much of its history, photography was never an isolated craft. Rather it reached into other areas of thought: art, science, and mechanical invention. Writers, painters, doctors, scientists, inventors, and explorers--all made use of photography. In doing so, they added to the great value of the work that is New England's photographic heritage. In many cases photography served as the common ground for these figures to exchange information."
This very interesting history text is composed of fourteen, fully illustrated chapters plus the introduction, notes, bibliography, check list of Photographers and Their Work and a detailed index. Almost every double-page spread includes a rare, and usually totally unknown early photograph.
One picture in particular which fascinated this reader/viewer was reproduced on page 130 and was taken by Baldwin Coolidge of Boston. It was taken on August 19, 1896 and shows a waterspout churning off the island of Martha's Vineyard. It shows the funnel cloud touching down off the coast with a railroad and what appears to be the local steam powered ferry docked in the foreground. While the book doesn't say so, this has to be one of the earliest photographs ever taken of that particular weather event and it's also a fascinating overall photo as well as a document of weather phenomena.
Other memorable photographs include a daguerreotype portrait of John Brown who was later hanged for deeds at Harper's Ferry. On a similar morbid subject, the photo of the Execution Chamber, Wethersfield, Conn. State Prison (Photographer unknown) is also a haunting image--although it contains no humans.
This book by William F. Robinson (no relation to me although that is my uncle's name) is excellent. It will remain so because while the history of photography will continue to progress, the first century is well preserved by this well-done book. It was a pleasure to read it and study the photographs reproduced in it.
Hopefully, this book will eventually be republished as an E-book so it is not lost to the world.