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Kubrick's Hope: Discovering Optimism from 2001 to Eyes Wide Shut download ebook

by Julian Rice

Kubrick's Hope: Discovering Optimism from 2001 to Eyes Wide Shut download ebook
ISBN:
0810862069
ISBN13:
978-0810862067
Author:
Julian Rice
Publisher:
Scarecrow Press; 1 edition (September 29, 2008)
Language:
Pages:
283 pages
ePUB:
1705 kb
Fb2:
1279 kb
Other formats:
docx doc lrf lit
Category:
Performing Arts
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Kubrick's Hope: Discovering Optimism from 2001 to Eyes Wide Shut as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Beginning with 2001: A Space Odyssey and continuing through A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut, Rice illuminates Kubrick's thinking at the time he made each film. Throughout, Rice examines the compelling political, psychological, and spiritual issues the director raises.

In Kubrick's Hope, Rice explains how the theories of Freud and Jung took cinematic form, and also considers the .

In Kubrick's Hope, Rice explains how the theories of Freud and Jung took cinematic form, and also considers the significant impression left on the director's last six films by Robert Ardrey, Bruno Bettelheim, and Joseph Campbell. As this book contends, if these works are considered together and repeatedly re-viewed, Kubrick's films may help viewers to personally grow and collectively endure.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Kubrick's Hope : Discovering Optimism from 2001 to Eyes Wide Shut. Walmart 9780810862067.

Frederic Raphael, who co-authored the Eyes Wide Shut script with .

Frederic Raphael, who co-authored the Eyes Wide Shut script with Kubrick, says that the director once remarked that "Hitler was right about almost everything", and insisted that any trace of Jewishness be expunged from the Eyes Wide Shut script. Kubrick's hope: discovering optimism from 2001 to Eyes wide shut. The Scarecrow Press, Inc. ISBN 978-0-8108-6206-7. Rose, Lloyd (June 28, 1987).

Kubrick's Hope : Discovering Optimism from 2001 to Eyes Wide Shut. S. J. Parris returns with the next Giordano Bruno mystery, set inside Queen Elizabeth's palace and steeped in period atmospherics and the strange workings of the occult

Kubrick's Hope : Discovering Optimism from 2001 to Eyes Wide Shut. Parris returns with the next Giordano Bruno mystery, set inside Queen Elizabeth's palace and steeped in period atmospherics and the strange workings of the occult. It is the year of the Great Conjunction, when the two most powerful planets, Jupiter and Saturn, align-an astrologi?cal phenomenon that occurs once every thousand years and heralds the death of one age and the dawn of another.

Kubrick's Hope: Discovering Optimism from 2001 to Eyes Wide Shut. Encyclopedia of Stanley Kubrick: From Day of the Fight to Eyes Wide Shut (Library of Great Filmmakers). Rodney Hill, Gene D. Phillips. In addition to providing useful contexts, Rice offers close readings of the films, inviting readers to note details they may have missed and to interpret them in their own way. By refreshing their experience of the films and discarding postmodern clichZs, viewers may discover more optimistic themes in the director's works.

The initial reception by journalists of most of Kubrick’s films was negative, said the film scholar Julian Rice, author of Kubrick’s Hope: Discovering Optimism from ‘2001’ to ‘Eyes Wide Shut. But as time went on, his films were taken more and more seriously, and now people are redefining him in terms of all of the contemporary postmodern theories. Among the topics of discussion are the many liberties, large and small, that Kubrick took with the original novel.

There have been two common assumptions about Stanley Kubrick: that his films portray human beings who are driven exclusively by aggression and greed, and that he pessimistically rejected meaning in a contingent, postmodern world. However, as Kubrick himself remarked, "A work of art should be always exhilarating and never depressing, whatever its subject matter may be." In this new interpretation of Kubrick's films, Julian Rice suggests that the director's work had a more positive outlook than most people credit him. And while other studies have recounted Kubrick's life and production histories, few have offered lucid explanations of specific sources and their influence on his films.In Kubrick's Hope, Rice explains how the theories of Freud and Jung took cinematic form, and also considers the significant impression left on the director's last six films by Robert Ardrey, Bruno Bettelheim, and Joseph Campbell. In addition to providing useful contexts, Rice offers close readings of the films, inviting readers to note details they may have missed and to interpret them in their own way. By refreshing their experience of the films and discarding postmodern clichés, viewers may discover more optimistic themes in the director's works.Beginning with 2001: A Space Odyssey and continuing through A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut, Rice illuminates Kubrick's thinking at the time he made each film. Throughout, Rice examines the compelling political, psychological, and spiritual issues the director raises. As this book contends, if these works are considered together and repeatedly re-viewed, Kubrick's films may help viewers to personally grow and collectively endure.
Reviews:
  • Ranenast
The cover is the best thing going for this book: an iconic photo from "2001" (Kubrick's greatest film in my humble opinion.) It is a still from the movie - but a masterful composition (a prime example of K's photographic origins and eye): Life, Death, Mystery, Beauty, Civilization - all captured in this one film frame. If Kubrick had been born before motion pictures came along, he would most certainly have been a master painter.

Anyway, apart from Devin Watson's wonderfully designed cover, Julian Rice's book is like many another collection of masturbatory meditations on the meanings of the Master's movies. I like film analysis, but grow distrustful of it when an agenda or grand synthesis or TOE (Theory of Everything) is pushed and crammed and jammed into the reader's mind ad infinitum, ad nauseum. As is the case in this book. The subtitle reveals this agenda quite clearly: "Discovering Optimism from 2001 to Eyes Wide Shut." Okay. Kubrick had Hope. But he had alot of other things going on in the films also. And to distill the films simply for these optimistic elements grows quite tedious, quite quickly. In this book, there are certain interesting insights, yes, but many avenues of thought are completely unexplored. (How could someone discuss "The Shining," for example, and completely ignore any discussion involving Lloyd the Bartender? Or make the mistake in believing that Delbert Grady and Charles Grady are "doubles" rather than script mistakes, as they more probably are. Yes, the Maestro made mistakes in his movies! Jack Torrance tears a page out of his typewriter in getting pissed at Wendy's intrusion, yet in the next cut the page is back in the roller. Going back to "Lolita", in the first scene of Humbert's entrance into Quilty's mansion - allegedly empty but for the blanket-hidden Quilty himself - we see a crewman rushing from the scene. Perhaps it is Kubrick himself. Despite the director's legendary perfectionism, he was not perfect: and the first name mix-up of Grady does not denote two separate individuals as Rice believes, but most likely a mistake in scripting.) Anyway - as to "2001" - Rice would have us believe that the monolith-inspired Moonwatcher and Bowman as an old man in a black bathrobe represent human monoliths themselves! It is a stretch. I believe it was more serendipitous than intentional on Kubrick's part, if you buy into the notion at all.

The book also goes way-too much into the color schemes of the films. Enough is enough! The descriptions of colors are especially irksome in the "Barry Lyndon" chapter. Yawn-inducing, actually. I felt like my head was spinning on a color wheel. Kubrick's colors are, of course, vitally important: but Rice gives undue emphasis to the color schemes at the expense of more fruitful insights.

There are really no startling discoveries in Rice's observations, nothing that a careful viewer of the films wouldn't discover for himself. I found the book to be ultimately boring - and made me want to watch the movies instead. And...I suppose that isn't a bad thing for a book on film to do. It just means that the films way outshine the book.
  • Gholbimand
I've read a lot about kubricks movies and i've seen a lot of things discussed that i had not considered much like lloyd the bartender in the shining and color use by kubrick and the meaning of the monolith ans so forth but i would like to see some discussion about the occult in the movies for example alluded to in the shining and in eyes wide shut. I think this is an area that has not been explored but that kubrick was suggesting involves the wealthy and powerful. Now more than ever would be a good time especially with all the exposures and discussions related to the new world order. I think this is an area that needs to be explored.
  • Questanthr
Over intellectualized pretentious blather. The book hyper-analyzes things Kubrick probably never though about. For instance, Rice describes in detail the every movement and vocal inflection of Nicole Kidman in the Eyes Wide Shut bedroom scene as representative of something deep(I thought it was just bad acting). In 2001, the ape Moonwatcher momentarily becomes erect while smashing the bone weapon, author Rice thinks he is mimicking the monolith because he is black and upright. Lots of name-dropping references to classic literature and philospohy. zzzzzz