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Giants of Jazz download ebook

by Robert Galster,Studs Terkel

Giants of Jazz download ebook
ISBN:
156584999X
ISBN13:
978-1565849990
Author:
Robert Galster,Studs Terkel
Publisher:
New Press, The; Revised Edition edition (September 1, 2006)
Language:
Pages:
214 pages
ePUB:
1323 kb
Fb2:
1781 kb
Other formats:
rtf lit mbr docx
Category:
Music
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

This book does nothing to diminish my ongoing (platonic) love affair with Studs Terkel, but after "The Spectator" I was hoping for a bit of the musicians themselves talking

This book does nothing to diminish my ongoing (platonic) love affair with Studs Terkel, but after "The Spectator" I was hoping for a bit of the musicians themselves talking. It's a good introduction for a general audience, Terkel's insights and crisp, funny writing make it worthwhile for readers more familiar with jazz history. Given that there are no footnotes it's difficult to tell where some of the history comes from.

Terkel published his first book, Giants of Jazz, in 1956. Terkel was acclaimed for his efforts to preserve American oral history

Terkel published his first book, Giants of Jazz, in 1956 He also served as a distinguished at the Chicago History Museum. Terkel was acclaimed for his efforts to preserve American oral history.

Studs Terkel is the author of twelve books of oral history, including, most recently, And They All Sang (The New Press). The book filled him in on the people he now admires. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and a member of the Academy of Arts and Letters, he was awarded the National Book Critics Circle Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003. Thank you for having a book that is now out of print.

Studs Terkel was an actor, writer, and radio host. He was born Louis Terkel on May 16, 1912 in New York City. He also won a Peabody Award for excellence in journalism in 1980 and the National Book Foundation Medal for contributions to American letters in 1997. He took his name from the James T. Farrell novel, Studs Lonigan. Terkel attended the University of Chicago and graduated with a law degree in 1934. Terkel acted in local stage productions and on radio dramas until he began one of the first television programs, an unscripted show called Studs Place in the early 1950s. He died on October 31, 2008 at the age of 96.

by. Terkel, Studs, 1912-; Daniel, Milly Hawk, joint author. Brief biographies of thirteen jazz musicians who have made major contributions to the development of this form of music. Discography: 189-200.

Created to celebrate Studs Terkel's 100th birthday, this large map, with historic photographs, identifies places that Studs cites as important with excerpts from his . His first book, way back in 1956, was Giants of Jazz.

Created to celebrate Studs Terkel's 100th birthday, this large map, with historic photographs, identifies places that Studs cites as important with excerpts from his books describing these memorable places in Chicago. Proceeds support StudsTerkel. In the 1970s he had a great success with Working, Hard Times and The Good War. Studs Terkel 100.

Robert Galster; Milly Hawk Daniel; Studs Terkel. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Robert Galster; Milly Hawk Daniel; Studs Terkel. Book Format: Choose an option. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12.

A beautifully illustrated edition of Studs Terkel's timeless portraits of America's jazz legends, for readers of all ages.Studs Terkel's first book, Giants of Jazz, is the master interviewer's unique tribute to America's jazz greats, now available in an affordable paperback edition with the original illustrations and discography.The thirteen profiles in this "luminous" (Jazzwise) collection weave together stories of the individual jazz musicians' lives with the history of the jazz era, and the music's evolution from the speakeasies of New York to the concert halls of the world's greatest cities. Terkel—a lifelong fan and friend of many of these legends—uses firsthand interviews with artists such as Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, and Charlie Parker to tell the human stories behind the giants who shaped this uniquely American music form. Some of the many fascinating details Terkel relates include Joe Oliver's favorite meal, Fats Waller's 1932 rendezvous in Paris with eminent organist Marcel Dupré, Dizzy Gillespie's childhood trip to a pawnshop to buy his first horn, and the origin of Billie Holiday's nickname. Paperback with French flaps, thirteen b/w illustrations.
Reviews:
  • Jark
Anything written by the late Studs Terkel is a gem. He certainly knew the people he wrote about from personal interviews, and from attending their gigs. This book went to a third generation admirer who got into buying vinyl records of these jazz greats. The book filled him in on the people he now admires. Thank you for having a book that is now out of print.
  • Inertedub
I sent it to a friend who is a jazz aficionado. He loves it.
  • Ese
Studs never disappoints.
  • Flower
Recently I have been on a tear reviewing the works of the recently departed Studs Terkel. As is the case, usually, when I get "hot" on an author I grab everything I can get my hands on and read it in no particular order. That is the case here. Terkel, widely known and deservedly so, as the author of oral histories concerning the pressing social issues of class, race and gender of working people (in the main)in America was also in his earlier career a popular Chicago disc jockey concentrating on jazz (and a little blues and folk as they intersected jazz). I had not previously known of that part of Studs' life and only became aware of it through reading his last work, a memoir of sorts but really a series of connected vignettes, "Touch and Go" (well worth reading by the way as background to his interest in the jazz figures highlighted here). Previously my knowledge of jazz was formed by the likes of Nat Hentoff and John Hammond. Apparently I have to revise this list to include Studs.

Why? As a member of the Generation of '68 my tastes were formed by blues, folk and early rock and roll and only incidentally by jazz. However, once one delves into the roots of all of these forms one can only understand the attractions when one sees the influences all those forms had on each other. Without going into a dissertation on the subject (useless in any case) jazz is a core beat that expressed one form of music that had its roots in the South, among blacks and was a reflection of the rural life that was being left behind as America became more industrialized. Jazz is the music of the city, as blues is (before World War II at least) the music of the southern countryside. But enough. Read Studs and you can see how the music developed (and was retarded as well by the rules of racial separation as whites looking for real music, other than the standard fare of likes of the Paul Whitman Orchestra or Tin Pan Alley, fell in love jazz after World War I).

Many of the names of the performers highlighted here have are the classic expressions of the jazz idiom. King Oliver, Louis Armstrong, The Empress Bessie Smith. The Duke (Ellington), The Count (Basie), Lady Day (Billie Holiday). Yes this is the royalty of jazz. For those who follow this space you already know of my devotion to Billie Holiday and Bessie Smith. Less well know is my devotion to the "king of Swing" Benny Goodman of the Peggy Lee days in the 1940's, Dizzy Gillespie of be-bop in the early 1950's and Duke Ellington of the early 1940's. Well, if you want to know more about them read on. By the way. This little book's format is an early example of Studs Terkel's easy style that he would work into an art form when he went full bore at his oral history interviews later. The only fault I would find here is that Studs is a little light on female singers. No Peggy Lee of the Benny Goodman days, no Margaret Whiting, no Helen Morgan, No Ivy Robertson. Oh well, I have always been a "sucker" for a `torch singer'. Maybe, Studs, except for Billie, wasn't.
  • Yozshunris
This book is well written (meaning: quite readable), but too simple for any serious jazz buff; it can be a nice intro for a younger reader who likes music and wants to find out about the canon of classical jazz.

The tales of King Oliver, Armstrong, Ellington, Gillespie, Goodman, Woody Herman, Holiday, Coltrane and others will probably entertain those who don't know much about the lives and music of the protagonists, the rest should skip this book.