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The Unanswered Question: Six Talks at Harvard (The Charles Eliot Norton Lectures) download ebook

by Leonard Bernstein

The Unanswered Question: Six Talks at Harvard (The Charles Eliot Norton Lectures) download ebook
ISBN:
0674920015
ISBN13:
978-0674920019
Author:
Leonard Bernstein
Publisher:
Harvard University Press; Revised edition (April 15, 1981)
Language:
Pages:
440 pages
ePUB:
1250 kb
Fb2:
1430 kb
Other formats:
mobi mbr rtf lit
Category:
Music
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

Leonard Bernstein was invited to become the Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University . Bernstein began his residency at Harvard in the fall of 1972

Leonard Bernstein was invited to become the Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University in 1971. This one-year position had previously been held by such notable musical figures as Igor Stravinsky and Aaron Copland, and by poets such as . Bernstein began his residency at Harvard in the fall of 1972. He immersed himself in the academic culture with enthusiasm, and his popularity with students resulted in his being named "Man of the Year" by Harvard's student newspaper. His daughter Jamie was an undergraduate at Radcliffe at the time, so his involvement in the University's student life had special meaning for him.

Leonard Bernstein's Norton Lectures on the future course of music drew cheers from his Harvard audiences and . This book is the literal transcript of the 6 Norton talks at Harvard in 1973.

Leonard Bernstein's Norton Lectures on the future course of music drew cheers from his Harvard audiences and television viewers. In this re-creation of his talks, the author considers music ranging from Hindu ragas through Mozart and Ravel to Copland, Schoenberg, and Stravinsky. Though you do feel he is at times trying to fit square pegs into round holes, you have to admire this creative insight.

The Unanswered Question book. Start by marking The Unanswered Question: Six Talks at Harvard (The Charles Eliot Norton Lectures) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The varied forms of Leonard Bernstein's musical creativity.

The Unanswered Question is a lecture series given by Leonard Bernstein in the fall of 1973. This series of six lectures was a component of Bernstein's duties as the Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry for the 1972/73 academic year at Harvard University, and is therefore often referred to as the Norton Lectures. The lectures were both recorded on video and printed as a book, titled The Unanswered Question: Six Talks at Harvard.

In 1972, the composer Leonard Bernstein returned to Harvard, his alma mater, to serve as the Charles Eliot Norton .

In 1972, the composer Leonard Bernstein returned to Harvard, his alma mater, to serve as the Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry, with "Poetry" being defined in the broadest sense. The position, first created in 1925, asks faculty members to live on campus, advise students, and most importantly, deliver a series of six public lectures. Delivered in the fall of 1973 and collectively titled "The Unanswered Question," Bernstein's lectures covered a lot of terrain, touching on poetry, linguistics, philosophy and physics. But the focus inevitably comes back to music - to how music works, or to the underlying grammar of music. The lectures run over 11 hours.

These talks, written and delivered when Leonard Bernstein was Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University, are the newest of the author's literary achievements

These talks, written and delivered when Leonard Bernstein was Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University, are the newest of the author's literary achievements. In addition to a distinguished career as conductor, pianist, and composer, Mr. Bernstein is the recipient of many television Emmys for the scripts of his Young People's Concerts, Omnibus programs, and others, and is the author of The Infinite Variety of Music and The Joy of Music, for which he received the Christopher Award.

The varied forms of Leonard Bernstein's musical creativity have been recognized and enjoyed by millions. These lectures, Mr. Bernstein's most recent venture in musical explication, will make fascinating reading as well. Virgil Thomson says of the lectures: "Nobody anywhere presents this material so warmly, so sincerely, so skillfully. As musical mind-openers they are first class; as pedagogy they are matchless.

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These were a series of lectures by Leonard Bernstein, filmed in 1973 when he held the title of Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard and includes performance footage with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Vienna Philharmonic

These were a series of lectures by Leonard Bernstein, filmed in 1973 when he held the title of Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard and includes performance footage with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Vienna Philharmonic. Perchance, any other.

The varied forms of Leonard Bernstein’s musical creativity have been recognized and enjoyed by millions. These lectures, Mr. Bernstein’s most recent venture in musical explication, will make fascinating reading as well. Virgil Thomson says of the lectures: “Nobody anywhere presents this material so warmly, so sincerely, so skillfully. As musical mind-openers they are first class; as pedagogy they are matchless.”

Mr. Bernstein considers music ranging from Hindu ragas through Mozart and Ravel, to Copland, suggesting a worldwide, innate musical grammar. Folk music, pop songs, symphonies, modal, tonal, atonal, well-tempered and ill-tempered works all find a place in these discussions. Each, Mr. Bernstein suggests, has roots in a universal language central to all artistic creation. Using certain linguistic analogies, he explores the ways in which this language developed and can be understood as an aesthetic surface. Drawing on his insights as a master composer and conductor, Mr. Bernstein also explores what music means below the surface: the symbols and metaphors which exist in every musical piece, of whatever sort. And, finally, Mr. Bernstein analyzes twentieth century crises in the music of Schoenberg and Stravinsky, finding even here a transformation of all that has gone before, as part of the poetry of expression, through its roots in the earth of human experience.

These talks, written and delivered when Leonard Bernstein was Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University, are the newest of the author’s literary achievements. In addition to a distinguished career as conductor, pianist, and composer, Mr. Bernstein is the recipient of many television Emmys for the scripts of his Young People’s Concerts, Omnibus programs, and others, and is the author of The Infinite Variety of Music and The Joy of Music, for which he received the Christopher Award.

Reviews:
  • Rasmus
This book and the DVD are quite insightful. Bernstein was a complex man and a thinker. In 1973, he was tackling a philosophical subject important to him: The aesthetic direction of music.

He traces the evolution of music. He demonstrates how western music gradually developed away from the fundamental diatonic structures of Bach, but remained rooted in the diatonic as its base structure. Going from Mozart, to Beethoven, to Wagner, to Debussy, music remained diatonically rooted, Then came Shoenburg, with his atonal structures, which basically threw everything out the window. Bernstein explains this situation as a crisis in the art of music, asking what is the right direction in music? This is his "unanswered question" (which is also the title of a piece by Charles Ives).

For amateur musicians, like myself, it is fascinating to watch, listen and read Bernstein's thoughts. From this I have gathered the importance of understanding harmonic structure, as opposed to just "playing the notes". He could get into the minds of composers when he conducted. He disassembles music into an objective analysis of its elements.

He stressed the importance of the underlying "Deep Structure" of music, which is usually only alluded to. He explains that all music is "metaphor", which alludes to a "Deep Structure" that is actually trivial. This is what separates the great composers from the mundane: Great composers are able to avoid sounding trivial and trite.

Bernstein's lecture is an overview - from a very high "30,000 feet level" - about a complex topic, which concerned him deeply. The DVD's are a rare a time capsule of a unique individual. His understanding of music represented the pinnacle of musical knowledge.
  • Yozshujind
This book is the literal transcript of the 6 Norton talks at Harvard in 1973. Brilliant and kudos to Bernstein for attempting to explicate the semantics of language vis-à-vis musical expression. Though you do feel he is at times trying to fit square pegs into round holes, you have to admire this creative insight. It is on the whole an eye opener and his snippets of musical analysis of musical scores simply wonderful and are worth it. I read this while watching the videos (from youtube) and found it delightfully illuminating.
  • Zeus Wooden
Lenny scores again with this insightful book based on the Norton lectures he gave at Harvard College. He was a graduate of Harvard and studied with Walter Piston among others. Together with Noel Chomsky, Bernstein has made music understandable to the masses. His lectures show a very detailed and careful analysis of musical structures and the nature of poetic vagueness and stretching tonal limits. I would not only recommend this book, I would call it a necessity to the serious music student.
  • Nikok
I watched the lectures when first broadcast on UK TV and bought the book and record when it was first published. I enjoyed it tremendously and it had a big impact on my musical knowledge and appreciation. His centenary reminds me that somewhere in the space of forty years and three marriages, I no longer have it. It's just arrived and opening it is like meeting an old friend after a long separation. Sadly there's no longer a record/CD.
  • Kagda
Great book to complement the video series. Seller shipped quickly and book arrived in pristine condition.
  • net rider
the book arrived within the given time frme. it's condition was exactly as described. it is a wonderful addition to my library.
Bernstein is an extraordinary person.
  • Hilarious Kangaroo
There is little to say that has not already been said. These lectures are classic because of their multi-disciplinary focus. Simiply put, they are an integration of diverse material that fosters an awareness of the larger picture. In the final analysis all intellectual disciplnes are arbitrary in terms of lines drawn in the sand. Ultimately they all come together as a whole. The Norton Lectures underscore this theme as well as any piece written in the 20th century.
The best book I read throughout my masters!!
It gives a very interesting insight on Music Universals, not to mention shows how beautiful Bernestein's mind was.